Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Do You Have Suggestions Of Movie/TV Scenes Showing People In “Flow”?

I’ve recently been spending some time thinking about developing a lesson to help my students understand the idea of entering into a “state of flow” — completely absorbed in a learning task.

You can read more about the concept at The Best Resources For Learning About “Flow.”

Do you have any suggestions of movie or TV scenes showing people in a “state of flow”?

Print Friendly

July 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

July’s Best Posts From This Blog

313997860619651_a-b6bc973c_JOnYUw_pm

I regularly highlight my picks for the most useful posts for each month — not including “The Best…” lists. I also use some of them in a more extensive monthly newsletter I send-out. You can see older Best Posts of the Month at Websites Of The Month (more recent lists can be found here).

Here are some of the posts I personally think are the best, and most helpful, ones I’ve written during this past month (not in any order of preference):

Jimmy Fallon Comes Up With Another Good Game For English Language Learners

“Race To The Top Has Been A ‘Fiasco’”

Are Researchers Who Helped Popularize VAM Having Second Thoughts?

It Doesn’t Matter If It’s “Effective” If Students Won’t Do It

NY Times Creates Their Own Version Of Google’s Ngram Viewer

Now Yelp Creates THEIR Own Version Of Google’s Ngram Viewer

“Teaching Without Connecting is ‘Futile’: An Interview With Annette Breaux & Todd Whitaker”

“12 New Yorker education articles to read while the archives are free”

Is Summer Learning The Silver Bullet For Narrowing The Achievement Gap?

‘A More Beautiful Question’: An Interview With Warren Berger

The New Yorker’s “Wrong Answer” Feature Is The Must-Read Education Article Of The Summer

If You Were Going To Read Just One Thing About Bloom’s Taxonomy, Then “What’s Old Is New Again” Would Be It

“Ideas for strengthening English skills over the summer”

“The Leftovers” Shared A Key To Motivation & Perseverance In The First 30 Seconds Of Last Night’s Episode

“Made From History” Is An Excellent BBC Site

Excellent (& I Mean EXCELLENT) Differentiation Infographic

All My Ed Week Posts On Student Motivation In One Place!

“Smarty Pins” Is A New Geography Game From Google

ThingLink Now Lets You Annotate Videos, Too

Print Friendly

July 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

July’s “The Best” Lists — There Are Now 1,335 Of Them!

July 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Resources For Learning About The Ebola Virus

The Ebola Virus is spreading in Africa, and potentially to an even wider area in the future.

Here are some resources to help understand what is happening (and please make your own suggestions in the comments):

The Worst Ebola Outbreak in History is Getting Worse is from GoKicker.

The deadliest Ebola outbreak in history is happening right now is from Vox.

Ebola Outbreak in West Africa Now the Worst in History is an interactive guide at Mashable.

Deadliest ever outbreak of Ebola virus: What you need to know is from CNN.

Check out this An interactive guide to Ebola at ThingLink.

Here’s an older Ebola Q & A from CBBC Newsround.

Deadly Ebola virus on the move in Africa is an infographic the Washington Post made in April, but it still has useful information.

Here are a number of useful videos, though I don’t think people seeing this post on an RSS Reader will be able to view all of them:

Print Friendly

July 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Jimmy Fallon Comes Up With Another Good Game For English Language Learners

It seems like Jimmy Fallon comes up a new game every year on his show that is easily adaptable to teaching English Language Learners in the classroom. You can see previous ones at I Learn Another Great Game For English Language Learners From Jimmy Fallon.

Last night, he played one called “5 Second Summaries” with actor James Franco. Each of them had five seconds to tell the plot of a movie in order to have the other guess the name of its name.

I’ve embedded Part Two of their playing below. You can see Part One, too, though there’s some slightly classroom inappropriate language in it.

Obviously, five seconds would be too short for ELLs, and then there’s the question of if there would be enough common knowledge of movies. But there are certainly ways to modify the game — for example, after having studied in a U.S. History class for several months, students could play this kind of game around figures from history.

Any other ideas on how to adapt it, or ways you’ve used a similar game in class?

I’m adding this game to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

Print Friendly

July 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Two More Important Commentaries On Recent Deliberate Practice Study

I’ve previously posted about the big new study that raised questions about the role of deliberate practice in becoming an “expert” at something (see Big New Study On Deliberate Practice).

Here are two more important commentaries on that study that I’m adding to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice:

We’ve Been Thinking About Talent The Wrong Way All Along is by Daniel Coyle.

Actually, practice doesn’t always make perfect — new study is by Alfie Kohn.

Print Friendly

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Students Seeing Assets, Not Deficits, In Their Neighborhoods

My favorite lesson each year is when my students compare their neighborhood with the wealthiest neighborhood in Sacramento, and then write a persuasive essay about which one they think is better.

At least ninety percent of them choose their neighborhood.

You can read — at length — about that lesson at A Lesson Highlighting Community Assets — Not Deficits.

Here’s a powerful tweet about Chicago students look at the assets in their neighborhood, too:

Print Friendly

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

More Resources On Sleep & Teenagers

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Create A Map Of Places You Want To See With “KLM Must See”

klm

The KLM Must See Map lets you create a map of most major cities in the world, along with the key places you want to see in them. No registration is required. If you want, you can invite others to make suggestions, too. Once you add sites to your map, you’re also provided with a link to go to where you can find out more about information about it.

It’s very easy to use. It does have two drawbacks, though, that preclude me from adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Plan Virtual Trips list.

One is that it’s business-sponsored promotion, which means it probably won’t be around for the long-term. The other sites on that list are tools that are much more likely to be around for at least the next school year.

Secondly, it looks like you’ve got to have some knowledge about the city you’re going to “visit” in order to make the map. Once you type in the name, it will automatically find it, but the other sites on that “The Best” list are more designed to introduce you to spots in the city that you then check-off to place on your maps.

It’s still a nice little tool to check-out, though.

Thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tip.

Print Friendly

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Two Good Resources For Virtual Field Trips

Here are two new additions to The Best Resources For Finding And Creating Virtual Field Trips:

6 virtual field trips to give lesson plans a boost is from Education Dive.

Here’s a map of virtual field trips and webcams that I learned about from Richard Byrne. You can see a bigger version here.


View Virtual Tours & Webcams in a larger map

Print Friendly

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles Highlighting Parallel Critiques Of Increasing School & Health Care “Efficiency”

There have been a number of articles and posts over the years highlighting efforts in education and in health care to institute similarly misguided changes in both areas.

Here are ones that I’ve seen, and feel free to suggest more:

Medicare Penalizes Nearly 1,500 Hospitals For Poor Quality Scores is from NPR, and shows that some hospitals get penalized unfairly for the same reasons inner-city schools receive criticism.

Why Evaluate Teachers and Doctors Differently? is by Walt Gardner at Education Week.

Should “Efficiency” Really Be The Driving Force In Hospitals (And Schools)?

Here’s an interesting NY Times article about performance pay for doctors, and here’s Paul Thomas’ commentary on it.

Walt Gardner wrote another post — Preparing Doctors and Teachers.

Coaching is Good for Doctors and Teachers Both is by John Thompson.

Bad Medicine is by EduShyster, and discusses the impact of similar elements of “school reform” into the medical profession.

NY Times Column Skewers Performance Pay

Quote Of The Day: Doctors & Teachers

Print Friendly

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

NY Times Column Skewers Performance Pay

Many school reformers view teacher merit pay as one of the “be all, end all” solutions to the challenges facing schools, even though it’s been found to never work (see The Best Resources For Learning Why Teacher Merit Pay Is A Bad Idea).

Today, The New York Times published a column that highlights all of what is wrong about merit pay. However, they talk about it in the context of doctors and the medical profession and not teachers.

Here’s an excerpt from The Problem With ‘Pay for Performance’ in Medicine and it’s all very applicable to teachers, as well:

Pay-for-performance-is

I’m adding it to a collection of resources I’ve been accumulating about the parallels between school and medical reformers.

Print Friendly

July 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Race To The Top Has Been A ‘Fiasco’”

Race To The Top Has Been A ‘Fiasco’ is Part Two in my series on the Race To The Top program, which has just had its fifth anniversary.

Today, Barnett Berry, Ariel Sacks, John Thompson, Alice Mercer and David B. Cohen weigh in with their thoughts, and I include comments from readers, too.

Here are some excerpts:

researchers-have-shown

Education-is-not-a-race

Im-expecting

We-have-a-lot-of-money

Maybe-enough-good-was

Print Friendly

July 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Amazing Video: 1980 Bush & Reagan Comments On If Undocumented Children Should Be Able To Attend Schools

This is amazing.

What has happened to the Republicans?

I’m adding this to The Best Resources About The New Push For Immigration Reform.

Print Friendly

July 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Resources On Why Breakfast Is Important For Teenagers

I’m preparing some new lessons for this year, and one will be on the importance of breakfast.

I’m adding this list to The Best Resources To Help Promote A Physically Healthy Lifestyle For Our Students.

Let me know if you have other suggestions:

Breakfast ‘keeps teenagers lean’ is from the BBC.

A Better Breakfast Can Boost a Child’s Brainpower is from NPR.

Good Health: Breakfast, exercise boost brain activity is a report from a Detroit news show.

My teenage students still get a kick out of Sesame Street:

Print Friendly

July 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Breaking News” Is An Engaging Tool For Reading…News

breaking

Breaking News is a current events news-reader designed in an intriguing way. You can type in whatever topic you want to read about — soccer, major news, refugees — and you’re provided with a list of headlines to stories about it. Clicking on the headlines will take you to the story. But the real interesting part of the site is that if you click on a globe icon on the upper right of the page, you’ll go to a world map showing you the location of the where the stories are originating. Clicking on the dots will also take you to the story.

I’m adding it to The Best Visually Engaging News Sites, which I just completely updated and revised.

Thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tip.

Print Friendly