Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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November’s (2014) Best Tweets — Part Four

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2014 — So Far.

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November 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

What Are Your Top One-To-Three Mobile Apps For The Classroom – & Why?

I’ve been asked to write a short article listing the ten “best” mobile apps for the classroom.

I’ve got my ideas, but thought I’d invite readers to contribute their own, as well.

Leave a comment, or send me a tweet, with one-to-three of your favorite apps and, ideally, also write one sentence for each one saying why you like it so much.

I’ll publish everybody’s suggestion in a blog post here — of course, giving credit — and will also give you credit if your app makes my “top ten” cut.

I’d love to hear apps that can be applicable to as many content areas as possible, and am also interested in ones for math and science since I don’t know much either of those subjects.

Please let me know your suggestions by December 15th.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Mobile Apps For English Language Learners

The Best Sites For Beginning iPhone Users Like Me

The Best Resources For Beginning iPad Users

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November 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: My Beginning ELL Students Learning To Tell Time In English

Here’s a video of a simple activity my Beginning ELL students did to learn to tell time in English. They created a poster explaining their daily schedule and then explained to the class and on video.

You can see more examples at our class blog.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning How To Tell Time.

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November 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2014

I do an annual “The Best…” list on the “words of the year” that various organizations name at about time of the year. Groups have begun their announcements, and I’ll add to list as more do the same.

You might also be interested in:

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2013

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2012

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2011

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2010

Here are The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2014:

‘Vape’ Joins Pot Lingo as Oxford’s Word of the Year is from The New York Times.

Take It In: ‘Vape’ Is The Oxford Dictionaries Word Of The Year is from NPR.

Vape: Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year is from Vox.

You might also be interested in my other 1,400 “The Best” lists.

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Giving Thanks: Eleven Key People Who Changed My Professional Career(s) — For The Better!

Yesterday, one of my favorite bloggers – Alexander Russo — wrote an excellent post titled Giving Thanks: 6 Key Moments That Changed My Post-Grad School Career .

It’s inspired me to do something similar:

1. Johnny Baranski, who invited me to join the Portland (Oregon) Catholic Worker and which led to my spending seven years in the Catholic Worker Movement, including starting a soup kitchen/emergency shelter in Santa Rosa, California.

2. Mary Ochs, who took a chance and hired me for my first job as a community organizer and led to a nineteen-year organizing career.

3. Larry McNeil, who was my first supervisor when I began organizing for the Industrial Areas Foundation and from whom I learned so much.

4. Jay Schenirer, then Sacramento School Board member, who encouraged me to apply for my first (and, so far, only) teaching job — at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento.

5. Ted Appel, Burbank principal, who hired me and who continues to provide incredible leadership at our school.

6. Kelly Young, who provides literacy consulting to our school and to others, and from whom I’ve learned more about teaching than from anyone else.

7. Katie Hull Sypnieski, Lara Hoekstra and Dana Dusbiber, close teaching colleagues, friends, and co-authors for the past eleven years.

8. John Norton from Middleweb, who provided very early encouragement to me to begin blogging and writing books.

9. Mary Ann Zehr, who suggested to Education Week that they approach me about writing a column there.

Feel free to share your “thank you’s” to people in the comments, or leave links to blog posts where you do the same….

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Resources On Ferguson

Here are new additions to The Best Resources On Ferguson For Use In The Classroom:


After Ferguson Announcement, a Racial Divide Remains Over Views of Justice
is from The NY Times.

Ferguson grand jury decision: between the lines of the St Louis County prosecutor’s announcement is an interactive from The Guardian.

From Cairo to Moscow: how the world reacted to Ferguson is from The Guardian.

Telling My Son About Ferguson is from The New York Times.

Talking About Racism With White Kids is from The New York Times.

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Even More Thanksgiving Resources

I spoke too soon in my previous post — those were not the last additions to The Best Sites To Learn & Teach About Thanksgiving. These are:

Why we celebrate Thanksgiving every year. It isn’t what you think. is from The Washington Post.

Map: Where your Thanksgiving dinner comes from is also from The Washington Post.

Seven global trends to be really, really thankful for is from The Wash. Post.

Thanksgiving Used to Look a Lot Like Halloween, Except More Racist is from The Atlantic.

A Tale of Two Thanksgivings: Canadian VS American Thanksgiving Celebrations

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Student Engagement Versus Student Compliance” Is Topic Of My Latest BAM! Radio Show

compliance

Student Engagement Versus Student Compliance: Does It Really Matter? is my latest ten-minute BAM! Radio show.

I speak with Debbie Silver and Bryan Harris, who have both contributed written responses to the topic for an upcoming Ed Week Teacher column.

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

Here are this week’s picks:

Chicago Public Schools students explain why Obama’s Ferguson speech failed is by Ray Salazar. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics.

56 Examples of Formative Assessment is by David Wees. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment.

Ten rules for teaching reading with prior knowledge is from The Fordham Institute. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading.”

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Few Last Thanksgiving Resources

November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Books That Grow” Is A Nice New Tool Offering Many Of The “Same” Texts At Different “Levels”

grow

I’ve been a bit surprised at how popular The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels” has been, though I probably shouldn’t be — these kinds of leveled texts can be very useful in the classroom.

Today, I’m making another nice addition to that list…

Books That Grow has a library of texts that have each been edited to be made accessible to different reading levels. And it has some other unique features — teachers can create virtual classrooms to assign and/or monitor what students what are reading and students can click on words that are new to them to see definitions and hear how they are pronounced. They are also planning on adding comprehension questions. The texts can be read on any device.

Everything is free for now, though they plan on starting to charge for some “premium” features in the 2015/16 school year.

You can register now on their sign-up page, and then they’ll contact you by email in a few hours or the next day with registration information. They won’t have a super-easy system in place until January for registering students in virtual classes, but they’ll do it for you manually prior to that time.

In addition to adding it to the previously-mentioned list, I’m going to put it on The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress one, too.

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November 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Create Virtual Classes & Have Students Write Book Reviews At “Bookopolis”

bookopolis

Bookopolis lets teachers create virtual classrooms — for free — where students can identify the book they’re reading (they just have to type in the title and the site automatically “finds” it) and write a review. There are a number of other features, too. It seems like a very useful site, though I’m less-than-thrilled with the extrinsic points and badges students can earn.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress and to The Best Places Where Students Can Post Book Reviews For Authentic Audiences.

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November 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2014 – Part Two

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I write many posts about recent research studies and how they can relate practically to the classroom. In fact, I post a regular feature called Research Studies of the Week. In addition, I write individual posts about studies I feel are particularly relevant to my work as a teacher.

I’m continuing with end-of-year “Best” lists, and it makes sense now to publish one on recent studies. You can see all my 1,400 “Best” lists here.

You might also be interested in:

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2014 – So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2013 – Part Two

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2013 — So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2012 — So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2011

Hare are My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2014 – Part Two:

The Power Of Having A “Purpose For Learning” In The Classroom

Oh, Boy, This Is Great! Researcher’s Scans Show Brain Connections Growing When Learning New Language

“Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling”

“We’re hooked on easy answers and undervalue asking good questions”

What A Shock! Study Finds That Student Reflection Helps Learning

What A Surprise – NOT! British Study Finds That Cash Rewards Don’t Motivate Students

“Curiosity improves memory by tapping into the brain’s reward system”

Another Study Finds The Destructive Effects Of Grade Retention

“How Diversity Makes Us Smarter”

Researchers See What A Growth Mindset Does To The Brain

VERY Interesting Info On The Results Of KIPP’s “Character Education” Program

Study: “Asking for Advice Makes You Seem More Competent, Not Less”

Big Surprise — NOT!: Study Says Students Are More Successful With “Active Learning” Than With Lectures

“A shocking statistic about the quality of education research”

Important Study: “Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall”

It Doesn’t Matter If It’s “Effective” If Students Won’t Do It

Big New Study On Deliberate Practice

New Study Reinforces Previous Ones Showing SEL Lessons Need To Be Short & Simple

The Best Research Demonstrating That Lectures Are Not The Best Instructional Strategy

Effective teaching: 10 tips on what works and what doesn’t is from The Guardian. It’s a very interesting summary of a meta-analysis on research done over the years.

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November 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Resources On Ferguson For Use In The Classroom

I wanted to quickly pull together a few of what I think might be particularly useful resources to use in the classroom in talking with students about the grand jury’s decision not to indict the officer who killed Michael Brown. Some of these are brand new. Many of us don’t have school tomorrow, but I know that many others do. I’ll be adding to this list and hope that readers will contribute, too…

First, here are three previously posted lists:

Teaching Ideas For #Ferguson #MichaelBrown

A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism and

How Many Of Our Students Feel This Way? (Resources On The Shooting Death Of Michael Brown)

And here are new ones from tonight:

Tracking the Events in the Wake of Michael Brown’s Shooting is an interactive from The New York Times.

What happened in Ferguson is a Washington Post interactive.

What Happened in Ferguson? is a NY Times interactive.

13 key questions-and-answers about the Ferguson grand jury decision is from The Washington Post.

5 Things About the Ferguson Decision is from The Wall Street Journal.

The Associated Press has published an interactive.

Protests After Ferguson Officer Is Not Indicted is from The NY Times.

Ferguson Police Officer Not Charged in Black Teen’s Shooting is from The Wall St. Journal.

Ferguson shooting & protests is CNN’s central page.

Witnesses Saw Michael Brown Attacking–and Others Saw Him Giving Up is from The Atlantic.

11 things we learned from Darren Wilson’s account in the Ferguson grand jury evidence is from Vox.

What Is Your Reaction to the Grand Jury’s Decision in the Ferguson Case? is from The NY Times Learning Network.

Gallery: Reaction in Ferguson and across the country

Chronicle of a Riot Foretold is from The New Yorker.

Law and Disorder in Ferguson is from The Marshall Project.

After Ferguson Announcement, a Racial Divide Remains Over Views of Justice
is from The NY Times.

Ferguson grand jury decision: between the lines of the St Louis County prosecutor’s announcement is an interactive from The Guardian.

From Cairo to Moscow: how the world reacted to Ferguson is from The Guardian.

Telling My Son About Ferguson is from The New York Times.

Talking About Racism With White Kids is from The New York Times.

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