Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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USDE Unveils “Teach To Lead”: Do We Really Need Another Online Community To Promote Teacher Leadership?

teachtolead

Education Secretary Arne Duncan today announced a new site that is supposed to promote teacher leadership and develop some kind of online community. It’s called Commit To Lead and is part of Teach To Lead, which in turn is connected to RESPECT program he announced earlier this year (you can read about that program in a post by Barnett Berry and another one by Stephen Lazar).

With all the online teacher communities already available (particularly the Center For Teaching Quality Collaboratory), it’s hard for me to believe that we really need another one.

The cynical side of me says that Secretary Duncan’s stepping back a bit from standardized testing last week and this renewed focus on teacher leadership has more to do with turn-out for the mid-term elections than anything else, but I hope I’m wrong.

Hope springs eternal, so I’m adding this info to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On “Teacher Leadership.”

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August 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“If you’re observant about things happening around you, there are insights waiting to be discovered”

Parking Behavior May Reflect Economic Drive is the title of an NPR piece on a new study suggesting that a nation’s economic health can be evaluated by if its drivers back-in or drive-forward into a parking space.

The study itself has big enough holes through which you could drive a truck, but that’s not that important for how I envision using it in my International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge class when we study human sciences.

The key point is made by NPR’s science correspondent at the end:

What-I-find-really

I think I’m going to have my TOK students read the NPR piece and many of the comments (while also looking at the issue of causation versus correlation), and then have them design a simple experiment (that they wouldn’t actually carry out) based on what they see around them and, at the same time, look at it through the lens of causation versus correlation.

For example, they could design an experiment studying if students who arrive last at their classes have lower grades than those who arrive first or if teachers who arrive at school forty-five minutes earlier at school are “better” teachers than those who arrive fifteen minutes earlier. Then, they could also discuss how causation versus correlation would fit into it.

What do you think? Are there ways I could make it a better lesson?

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August 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Resources On Students & Sleep

August 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Education Is Not ‘Moneyball’: Why Teachers Can’t Trust Value-Added Evaluations Yet”

August 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“The Dos and Don’ts of Classroom Management: Your 25 Best Tips”

edutop

Apparently, long ago when, for awhile, I moderated a classroom management forum at Edutopia, I invited readers to share their best classroom management tips.

Well, Edutopia just put them all together in a a nice slideshow that I think readers will find useful.

I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Classroom Management.

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August 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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September 8th Is International Literacy Day — Here Are Related Resources

UNESCO has declared September 8th to be “International Literacy Day” for the past forty years.

You might find The Best Resources For International Literacy Day useful.

By the way, the International Reading Association is working with NASA on a related project — Story Time From Space.

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August 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“‘Building A Better Teacher’: An Interview With Elizabeth Green”

‘Building A Better Teacher’: An Interview With Elizabeth Green is my latest post over at Education Week Teacher.

For today’s author interview, Elizabeth Green has offered to answer a few questions about her book, Building A Better Teacher.

Here are two excerpts:

Expert-teaching-means

the-dichotomy-between

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August 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

Here are some recent valuable posts and articles on educational policy issues:

A Quick Look At The ASA Statement On Value-Added is from The Shanker Blog. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation.

Do Evaluations Penalize Teachers of Needy Students? is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to the same list.

Teachers Should Be Evaluated Like Athletes: Here’s Why appeared in The Huffington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

Can Supt. Deasy survive LAUSD’s iPad fiasco? is from The Los Angeles Times. LA schools cancel iPad contracts after KPCC publishes internal emails is from Southern California Public Radio. I’m adding both to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

The Teach Like a Champion Paradigm is a very interesting post about Doug Lemov’s methods. It’s by Ben Spielberg.

Trust and Obey is a great post by Nancy Flanagan about teacher absences. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About The Importance Of Teacher (& Student) Working Conditions.

Would Ending Tenure Help Schools? is from The NY Times. I’m adding it to The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Both Why Teacher Tenure Is Important & The Reasons Behind Seniority-Based Layoffs.

I’m adding this series of tweets to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy:

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August 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Zaption Adds “Ready-To-Use” Video Gallery

zaption

Zaption is a tool that lets you easily add videos with interactive questions for students, and then you can track student progress. They recently made it free-of-charge. It’s on A Potpourri Of The Best & Most Useful Video Sites list.

Today, they announced a “gallery” of ready-to-use video collections that have been created by educators and that others can use. They look pretty good, especially the U.S. History ones.

Our school’s technology capacity is pretty antiquated, so I don’t anticipate spending a lot of time creating new online content for my U.S. and World History English Language Learner students (since who knows what tech will be available when and, if it is available, if it’s going to work — a relatively minor inconvenience at an otherwise remarkable school). However, having these kind of resources available to reinforce what students are learning in the classroom can come in very handy. The tracking of student progress is quite easy — they don’t even have to register or sign-in to the site in order to answer the questions and have me view their responses.

So I anticipate posting links to a number of them on my U.S. History and World History class blogs.

I’m also adding Zaption to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

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August 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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August’s Infographics & Interactives Galore – Part Four

There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.”

You can see others at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics and by searching “infographics” on this blog.

I’ll still be publishing separate posts to individually highlight especially useful infographics and interactives, but you’ll find others in this regular feature.

Here goes:

Chart: College really does pay for most people is from Vox. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career.

Assess Your Cultural Profile is an intriguing interactive from the Harvard Business Review. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

Spotify has a site called Serendipity that shows you on a map when two people in different parts of the world play a song at exactly the same time. I’m adding it to that list, too.

I’m adding this infographic to the same list:

Cuisine Around the World

I’m adding this next infographic to The Best Visualizations Of Poverty In The U.S. & Around The World:

What You Need To Know About Immigration Reform is from The Lowdown at KQED. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About The New Push For Immigration Reform:

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August 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Excellent “Reading Research Summary” From Scholastic

open1

Scholastic has just unveiled a new website focused on the joy of reading. It includes a number of materials, including videos and a free downloadable book with contributions from educators about their own reading experiences.

In my mind, though, the most valuable part of it is a Reading Research Summary on the “Joy and Power of Reading.” I don’t think you’re going to find a better compilation anywhere.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources Documenting The Effectiveness of Free Voluntary Reading.

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August 26, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two Of The Most Student Accessible Articles I’ve Seen On Self-Control

I’ve written a lot — both on this blog and in my books — on strategies to help students motivate themselves to develop self-control.

Here are two of the most accessible, if not THE most accessible, pieces I’ve seen for students to read on the topic (both are from Fast Company):

6 SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN WAYS TO BOOST YOUR SELF-CONTROL

5 QUICK TRICKS TO BOOST YOUR WILLPOWER

I’m adding both to The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control.

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August 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Creating Positive Relationships With Students

relation

Creating the Ideal Relationship with Your Students was the topic of a recent BAM! Radio show where I was one of three guests.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources On The Importance Of Building Positive Relationships With Students.

And, speaking of BAM! Radio, in two weeks I’ll start doing new ten-minute weekly broadcasts with educators writing responses for my Ed Week teacher advice column. In the meantime, you can listen to ones from last “season.”

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August 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Personal Writing Based on The Times’s Sunday Routine Series” Is A Nice Idea From The Learning Network

writ

Reader Idea | Personal Writing Based on The Times’s Sunday Routine Series is a very useful post at The New York Times Learning Network.

It’s a simple teacher-suggested lesson plan that includes some very useful student hand-outs that is particularly timely at the beginning of the school year.

I obviously didn’t write it but, for now (until I create another “Best” list), I’ll be adding it to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

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August 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Leap.it” Could Be A Useful Search Engine For English Language Learners

leapit

Leap.it is a new search engine that portrays search results in a visually attractive way (see the above image and compare it to the image below from Google searching the same topic: Christopher Columbus).

I don’t really understand how — apart from the display — that it’s different from Google or Bing, but TechCruch explains it in this post, though after reading it I still don’t have a clue what they’re talking about.

One feature that could come in handy for students doing research is that you’re supposed to be able to create something called a “perspective” which appears to just be your own personal collection of sites that could be shared with other. I like that idea, but couldn’t figure out how to make it work.

Nevertheless, because of the display itself, I’m adding it to The Best Search Engines For ESL/EFL Learners.

colum

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