Here’s the latest in my “The Best…” series, which now numbers over sixty lists. This particular one, The Best Websites To Teach & Learn Life Skills, particularly goes along with two of my previous lists, The Best Websites For Students Exploring Jobs & Careers and The Best Sites For Learning Economics & Practical Money Skills.

It probably also makes sense to use this list, too, in conjunction with The Best Health Sites For English Language Learners.

I haven’t really been able to find that many sites that cover a lot of different life skills, and that are accessible to English Language Learners. Those that do are ranked high on this list. Other sites just have one or two good activities that relate to a particular life skill.

Here are my picks for The Best Websites To Teach & Learn Life Skills:

Number nine are several activities from the English Zone. They include an Envelope Reading Lesson, a nice activity about addressing and reading an envelope; and a couple on reading maps.

Marshall Adult Education Student Lessons is the seventh-ranked site on my list. They have several excellent activities.

Number six is Lifeskills Lessons from EL Civics For ESL Students. This fine site has also been included on other lists I’ve posted.

Multi-Cultural Educational Services in Minnesota has some excellent online exercises on writing a check, filling out a form, using a timesheet, and reading a map. It’s ranked number five here.

The second-ranked site is the fine series of audio and animated newsletters called The Learning Edge. There are many good articles in their back issues, especially in Issue Four. One of their other issues also has a nice exercise about phone bills.

The number one Best Website To Teach And Learn Life Skills, I think, is Everyday Life. This site has made several other lists I’ve compiled. Its activities on food, money, work, shopping and maps are excellent.

“The Library Of ESL Lesson Plans: North Carolina Curriculum Guide” is an impressive collection of life-skills lesson plans developed by several local community colleges.

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