NOTE: This list was regularly updated from 2008 until the 10th anniversary of the war in 2013, but I’ve also since added a few more new resources.

One of the classes I’m teaching this year is United States History.  In thinking ahead, I’ve been preparing some lessons about the Iraq War, and have been shocked at how few resources I’ve found out there that have been specifically prepared for English Language Learners, or are even somewhat accessible.

I thought I’d create a “The Best…” list sharing what I have found.  Many of them have some features that are accessible and other parts that are not because either the vocabulary is too advanced or people speak too fast in the audio.  Some of the information isn’t quite up-to-date on a number of the sites.  For the most recent accessible news stories, you might want to check the resources on The Best News/Current Events Websites For English Language Learners — 2007.

Here are my picks for The Best Web Resources On The Iraq War (that are helpful to teaching English Language Learners, of course):

 

The Toll of War from National Public Radio shows both military and civilian casualties over the course of the war.

The CBBC Newsround has a special section on Iraq that has a wealth of materials accessible to English Language Learners, though some of them are a bit dated.

Iraq: Five Years In is a continually updated multimedia timeline and history of the U.S. war in Iraq by The New York Times.

Rethinking Schools has a special section on Teaching About The War which, while their materials and ideas may require a fair amount of modification for accessibility, is still worth a look for ideas.

Six Years In Iraq is a slideshow from TIME Magazine.

Iraq: After Saddam Photo Diary comes from CBS News.

The Toll In Iraq is an accessible interactive graphic on the casualty toll of American troops since the start of the war.

Documenting The Return of US War Dead is a series of images from The Boston Globe’s The Big Picture documenting the return of the bodies of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. It was the first such event allowed to be covered by the media in eighteen years.

U.S. Combat Troops Pull Out of Iraqi Cities is a slideshow from the Washington Post.

Seven Years in Iraq: An Iraq War Timeline is from TIME Magazine.

“Iraq & Afghanistan War Casualties” is a pretty amazing interactive graphic from CNN showing all U.S. casualties from both wars.

The New York Times Learning Network just published The Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq: Teaching Resources and Essential Questions.

War Words is an interesting interactive from The Wall Street Journal. It shows “word clouds” to illustrate how U.S. Presidents have spoken about the Iraq War since 2003.

Last U.S. combat troops leave Iraq is the title of a slideshow from The Washington Post.

Going Home From Iraq is a TIME Magazine slideshow.

Eight Years In Iraq: A Look At The Conflict and Its Milestones is an interactive from The Wall Street Journal.

A Look Back At The Iraq War is a Wall Street Journal slideshow.

An Uneasy Peace In Iraq is another Wall St. Journal slideshow.

Timeline: Major Events in the Iraq War is from The New York Times.

Drawing Down, Moving Ahead is a slideshow from The Times.

Iraq’s Resting Places is another NY Times slideshow.

Last Flight Out Of Iraq is a Wall Street Journal slideshow.

Photos: Last U.S. troops leave Iraq is from CNN.

Last US troops withdraw from Iraq is a multimedia timeline from the BBC.

Ten Grim Lessons Learned From the Iraq War is from TIME.

Deadly Iraq war ends with exit of last U.S. troops is a series of videos from CNN.

Leaving Iraq is a NY Times slideshow.

Looking Back at Iraq is a Wall Street Journal slideshow.

Iraq invasion: 10 years later is a photo gallery from CBS News.

10th Anniversary of the Iraq War is a photo gallery from US News.

Early Days of the Iraq War is a NY Times interactive.

Here are several CNN videos related to the ten year anniversary.

Maps: Crisis in Iraq is from CNN.

The Iraq-ISIS Conflict in Maps, Photos and Video is from The New York Times.

I’d certainly be interested in hearing suggestions, so please feel free to leave them in the comments section.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at previous “The Best…” lists and also consider subscribing to this blog for free.