Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

The Best Sites For Learning About Prehistoric Cave Paintings

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You may think this is one of my stranger “The Best…” lists, but it was prompted by a very cool infographic in this month’s issue of New Scientist that compares the symbols used in cave paintings throughout the world. (thanks to Cool Infographics for the tip). You can read the entire article here.

The infographic prompted me to review related resources I’ve posted about in the past, and I was easily able to come-up with this list of resources accessible to English Language Learners.

Here are my choices for The Best Sites For Learning About Prehistoric Cave Paintings (not in any order of preference):

Obviously, the infographic I’ve mentioned previously from The New Scientist.

Magnificence on Cave Walls is the title of a Wall Street Journal article about a cave in Zimbabwe that has extraordinary paintings by prehistoric people. The article isn’t accessible to English Language Learners, but an excellent slideshow is.

Many people are familiar with the French government’s useful website on the famous cave of Lascaux and its ancient paintings. Recently, though, they have created a new site that is out of this world! Go take a virtual 3D tour of the site…

You can access a number of free PowerPoint presentations on cave paintings here.

The Bradshaw Foundation has several excellent resources. They include a multimedia American Rock Art Archive and a French Cave Paintings and Rock Art Archive.

Here’s the multimedia site of The Cave of Chauvet-Pont-D’Arc.

How Stuff Works has some good, short videos on Cave Paintings, as well as some accessible text.

National Geographic has two good interactives on cave paintings.

YouTube has some excellent related videos.

Louvre on the Rocks: Cache of Aboriginal Art Revealed is an article and slideshow about recently discovered ancient cave paintings in Australia.

‘The oldest work of art ever’: 42,000-year-old paintings of seals found in Spanish cave is from The Mail Online.

Spanish Cave Paintings Oldest in the World is a Wall Street Journal slideshow.

An archaeologist believes some cave paintings were really meant to be an early form of animation. He created this video, and you can read more about him here:

What prehistoric art tells us about the evolution of the human brain is a slideshow from Slate.

Feedback is always welcome.

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You might also want to explore the 400 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

One Comment

  1. Larry, I am delighted to meet you. I have been concerned about the possibility that the history of art would be lost to students. I like to solve problems so I started a not-for-profit, went back to school when I was 70, learned Dreamweaver and then went to the Apple store to learn iWeb

    The mission is to create a history of art that goes around the world in the different time lines. I started Prehistoric Art with the Bradshaw collection. You have my url and I would love to hear from you. If you want to know more about me scroll down the right hand side of the page and click on Meet Katherine.

    I do hope to hear from you. Any input positive or negative is welcome.
    Katherine Bolman

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