Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

The Best Sites For Learning About Human Evolution

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This list is a “sister” list to The Best Online Resources To Learn About Charles Darwin.

There are a lot of resources on the Web related to evolution but, I have to say, I didn’t find many of them accessible to me — much less an English Language Learner.

This list is pretty short because of my using that accessibility criteria. I’m very interested in hearing suggestions of additional sites that I might have missed.

Here are my choices for The Best Sites For Learning About Human Evolution:

Obesity? Big Feet? Blame Darwin: Evolution Helped Humans Have Children and Survive, But It Also Led to Modern-Day Maladies, Scientists Say is a good interactive with a very long title from The Wall Street Journal.

Before and After Humans is an interactive from MSNBC that forecasts various paths human evolution might take in the next few million years.

Who’s Who In Human Evolution is a PBS interactive.

Here are several more PBS interactives related to evolution.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of National History just unveiled a website from their Human Origins program called “What Does It Mean To Be Human?” It’s an amazing multimedia site on human evolution.

Tree of Life is an extraordinarily informative interactive that might be a bit too complicated for students to use, but it sure looks neat…

“Building A Human Body” is a nice interactive from NPR on human evolution. You can find more NPR interactives related to evolution at How Evolution Gave Us The Human Edge.

“Becoming Human” is a PBS show that has good videos and interactives about evolution.

“The Top Ten Daily Consequences of Having Evolved” Smithsonian

Compare Skeletons is an interactive from PBS.

Our human ancestors and their relatives – in pictures is from The Guardian.

The most ludicrous depictions of evolution in science fiction history is form i09.

How The Human Face Might Look In 100,000 Years is from Forbes.

Human evolution: the next stages is from The Guardian.

Feedback is always welcome.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

One Comment

  1. How about the Smithsonian Human Origins Initiative’s new website on human evolution? It went live just a few days ago! http://HumanOrigins.si.edu

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