Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

The Best Ways To Create Online Video Playlists

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'YT Video Playlist Old' photo (c) 2011, Sean Lucas - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It sometimes can be useful to have videos you want to use in class organized in an online “playlist” that is easy to create:

Here are my choices for The Best Ways To Create Online Video Playlists:

Embedr is the one many teachers use, and it makes it pretty darn easy to create a video playlist. I’ve even heard some people say that YouTube videos on their Embedr playlists have been able to get pass content filters, though that has not been my experience.

World TV is a new site that also makes it quite easy to create such a list.

Movieclips has thousands of short video clips from movies and they’re not blocked by our content filter! And they’re available without registering — except for clips that have “mature” content. The clips are categorized by theme, character, setting, mood, and more. They’re incredibly detailed. That in itself makes it a wonderful resource. But that’s not why it’s on this list. It also has a “Mashups” feature that lets you create video playlists of clips you choose.

Radbox looks like an impressive tool for creating video playlists. Instead of describing it here, I’d recommend you check-out Jeff Thomas’ complete description.

ShortForm lets you easily create your own “channel” of YouTube videos. It would make it easy to “curate” videos that a teacher would want to use in a classroom if you’re in a district like mine that gives teachers access to YouTube. Thanks to TechCrunch for the tip.

B00mBox lets you create a YouTube playlist collaboratively with others of your choice.

Vidque is a new site that lets you collect videos from several online video sites.

Magnify Free lets you create your own video playlist and video channel.

Not that the world necessarily needs another tool to let you easily organize playlists from various video-hosting sites but, nevertheless, Yokto is another good entry into the field.

Veengle is a neat tool that lets you clips sections from YouTube videos and create a playlist to show them all together. You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog.

ShortForm lets you grab videos from YouTube, Vimeo and Hulu to create your own video “channel” that can also be embedded. In addition, you can create live events where videos can be shown to an audience. You can read more about it at TechCrunch.

It’s always nice to find a web tool that can be used for a number of purposes, and David Kapuler (whom I have previously nominated for an Edublogs Award) has found one with MentorMob. It lets you very easily create a slideshow. Webpages, videos and photos can be grabbed from the web and added, along with notes. It’s easy to use, very intuitively designed so just about anyone can figure it out, and attractive.

Huzzaz lets you create video collections that you can embed in your website.

Let me know if you have suggestions of other apps that lets you create video playlists — ones that are not just YouTube and/or MySpace videos.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 490 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

(There is a new site called List and Play. It does only use YouTube videos, but it’s so easy to use I thought some readers might find it useful and am including it here as an “addendum.”)

Veedlist

Create “Playlists” Of Educational Videos, Websites & Google Docs With HippoCampus (Plus Explore English Interactives)

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

One Comment

  1. Hi Larry,

    OER website HippoCampus.org also allows users to create playlists of videos (or web pages, or PowerPoints, or Google docs, or any combination of those) and annotate them as well. For content that’s already on HippoCampus (core academic subjects for 7th-12th grades), it’s a matter of drag-and-drop. For content outside HippoCampus, just paste in the URL in the appropriate dialogue box and give it a title.

    I’ve done a four-minute tutorial (I’m the product manager) for how it works, which you can see from any of the HippoCampus subject pages or directly from vimeo:

    http://vimeo.com/73903908

    HippoCampus content is free for individual teachers and students to use, and it’s free to create an account (which you’d need to do if you want to create a Playlist).

    Thanks!
    Beth

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