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The Best Resources For Creating Infographics

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'Infographic Elements 02' photo (c) 2013, Andrea Balzano - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Infographics are visual representations of data design to help communicate information clearly. They are great for English Language Learners, and the rest of us, too! The information can also be either serious or humorous.

To see examples of some of the best ones, you can visit:

The Best Infographics — 2010

The Best Interactive Infographics — 2009

You can find even more at The Best Sources For Interactive Infographics and A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics.

Of course, you don’t need online resources to have students create their own infographics that can be used towards achieving numerous learning outcomes, as I recently posted about at What A Great Infographic To Use As A Model For Students.

However, creating them online can also be both useful and fun — for both teachers and students.

Here are my choices for The Best Resources For Creating Infographics:

I’m going to start-off with some of my previous “The Best…” lists, including:

The Best Resources For Learning About “Word Clouds”

Not “The Best,” But “A List” Of Mindmapping, Flow Chart Tools, & Graphic Organizers

The Best Tools To Make Simple Graphs Online

The Best Sites For Learning About Cartograms

The Best Map-Making Sites On The Web

The Best Posts To Help Understand Google’s New “Books Ngram Viewer”

Cool New Word Visualization Tool!

And here are resources from other sites:

Make Your Own Infographic from the Wild Apricot blog.

5 Unbeatable Types of Infographic + Free Tools to Create Them comes from The Search Engine Journal.

10 Awesome Free Tools To Make Infographics is from The Make Use of blog.

5 Amazing Tools to Create Your Own Infographics comes from Techchai.

Visualize Everything: 32 Free Tools To Create Different Diagrams is from the 1st Web Designer.

Teaching With Infographics | A Student Project Model from The New York Times Learning Network.

The World Bank held a competition for Web developers to create interactives making the World Bank data more accessible. They have received an amazing number of these online apps. You can see all the submissions at Apps For Development. I’m not sure how many, if any, are accessible to English Language Learners, but I haven’t checked them all out and, in fact, have barely scratched the surface. Better World Flux is one that’s getting a fair amount of attention. It’s particularly attractive since users can quickly create their own visualizations with the app and them with others.

NewsLab has developed some nice video tutorials on using two tools to create infographics — Google Maps and Many Eyes. Here they are:

I posted about a site called Daytum two years ago — before it opened for the public. It’s a super-easy tool to use to visual any kind of data, though its primary purpose for people to use it to keep track of personal data. I had forgotten about it until I saw an article in The New York Times — Illustrating Your Life in Graphs and Charts — that mentioned it. I’m adding Daytum to list.

Create A Better Life Index lets you, without having to register, create an infographic emphasizing the qualities that you believe are key for a “better life” and showing how different countries in the world are doing in those areas. You can then your infographic with others. It’s from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

I also have to mention the new website Visual.ly, which began year and is a source of great infographics and new tools to easily create them. They will be rolling out these tools throughout 2011.

A Few Rules for Making Homemade Infographics comes from The Atlantic.


Creating Infographics with Students
is from Langwitches.


Visualize.me
lets you immediately turn your resume into an infographic. Unfortunately, right now it only works through Linked In. However, its founder says it will integrate that ability to other sites, too, including Facebook and Twitter.

The Anatomy Of An Infographic: 5 Steps To Create A Powerful Visual is a useful outline.

Thanks to Nik Peachey, I’ve learned about Easel.ly , which is hands-down the easiest tool I’ve seen on the Web to create infographics. You just “drag-and-drop” a variety of themes, type in your data, and you’ve got a great infographic. Here’s a video from the site explaining how it works:

Infogr.am looks like a pretty easy tool for creating infographics that can be linked to or embedded. The selection of templates is pretty limited, but the site is still in beta. The main problem with the site is that you can only log-in using a social media site like Facebook or Twitter. That makes it usable for teachers, but, since those sites are blocked in most schools for students, they would not be able to create their own.

Venngage is the newest easy tool for creating online infographics. Like several other sites on list, it has a number of templates where you just add your info, click publish, and you get an embeddable image.

Through Silvia Tolisano, I recently learned about a very creative idea of using concrete objects to make infographics. You can find out more about idea at:

Creating Infographics: Making Numbers Sing

A Kit For Creating Homemade Real-World Infographics, Using Balloons And Wood

8 Steps to Create an Infographic is a useful infographic.

Innovative educators use infographics to engage learners is a post from The Innovative Educator.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory of NASA has a site called JPL Infographics where you can find a bunch of great…infographics. But what’s even better is that it’s set up for people to create their own, too.

Teaching With Infographics is from the Aside Blog.

Infographics: Round 2 is from Joyce Valenza.

Piktochart

Presenter is a new free online tool for creating online presentations, animations and — at least in my mind — most importantly, infographics. Most of the options on Presenter all look impressive but, for my technologically incompetent tastes, are just slightly more complicated than I would like (though I’m sure they all would be fine for most readers of blog). I, though, particularly like their infographic tool. Once you register and sign-on, you have the option to click on the Presenter tool or a tool to create websites. The Presenter tool is free, and the website one costs money. After you click on Presenter, you’re offered different features within it, including infographics. They only offer a few templates now, but I’m sure more will become available soon.

Creating Infographics With Your Students is by Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano.

infographics provides a pretty decent guideline for making good infographics:

How To Create An Awesome Infographic
How To Create An Awesome Infographic

Beyond the Book: Infographics of Students’ Reading History is from Edutopia.

5 Tools For Creating Your Own Infographics is a post from Read Write Web.

With one exception, it doesn’t any new tools that aren’t already on list and, in fact, misses quite a few. However, for the sites it does cover, it gives great overviews with nice screenshots. You probably won’t find a better overview of them anywhere.

The one tool it did cover that was new to me was called Infoactive. It’s only open by invitation now, and you can sign-up for one. It seems pretty intriguing since, unlike most other infographic tools, Infoactive is supposed to let you make interactive infographics. Be aware, though, that when I first visited their site I received a virus threat warning that my AVG software said it removed, so I don’t know what was up with that.

Here’s a video about Infoactive:

What Infographics Are

Robin Richards – What Makes an Infographic Cool?

Vizalizer is a new tool for creating infographics. It lets you make ten each month for free. I think it’s probably not quite as easy as some of the other tools on list, but it could still be useful.

Here’s a video about it:

The Guardian has published a slideshow of 16 useless infographics which also includes short explanations about what is wrong with each one.

It’s a perfect teaching tool to use prior to having your students create an infographic, which is why I’m adding it here.

I think infographic would be a useful one to show students prior to their creating one.

An infographic timeline of timelines and infographics

by Copponex.
Explore more infographics like one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

Anatomy of a Great Infographic

A recent study was published identifying what elements make an infographic more memorable. Here’s an excerpt from an article on the study:

“A visualization will be instantly and overwhelmingly more memorable if it incorporates an image of a human-recognizable object—if it includes a photograph, people, cartoons, logos—any component that is not just an abstract data visualization,” says Pfister. “We learned that any time you have a graphic with one of those components, that’s the most dominant thing that affects the memorability.”

Visualizations that were visually dense proved memorable, as did those that used many colors. Other results were more surprising.

“You’d think the types of charts you’d remember best are the ones you learned in school—the bar charts, pie charts, scatter plots, and so on,” Borkin says. “But it was the opposite.”

Unusual types of charts, like tree diagrams, network diagrams, and grid matrices, were actually more memorable.

“If you think about those types of diagrams—for example, tree diagrams that show relationships between species, or diagrams that explain a molecular chemical process—every one of them is going to be a little different, but the branching structures feel very natural to us,” explains Borkin. “That combination of the familiar and the unique seems to influence the memorability.”

8 Types Of Infographics & Which One To Use When is a useful series of…infographics.

Introduction To Infographics is from the infographic-creator Piktochart, but the information it contains is useful for making any kind of infographics.

If you want people to remember your chart, include a dinosaur is from the Boston Globe.

Canva is a new tool for creating infographics. You can learn more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog. An Easy Guide to Creating a Presentation in Canva is from the Canva blog.

The Secrets Of A Memorable Infographic is from Co Design.

How to Make Your Own Infographic from Razor Social.

14 Great Tools to Create Engaging Infographics and Images for your Social Media Posts is from Buffer.

I learned about Visage, a new tool for creating infographics, from The Why Axis. They won’t be unveiling their self-service site for a few months, it looks like it might have some potential. Here’s a video about it:

NY Times Creates Their Own Version Of Google’s Ngram Viewer

Now Yelp Creates THEIR Own Version Of Google’s Ngram Viewer

Inventing Infographics: Visual Literacy Meets Written Content is from Edutopia.

Feedback is welcome.

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You might also want to explore the nearly 600 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

11 Comments

  1. Pingback: The Best Resources For Creating Infographics | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... | Informatics Technology in Education | Scoop.it

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  4. I came across this post while doing a web search for help with creating infographics. It must have taken you a long time to compile such an extensive resource list. I’ll put the information on this article to good use.

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  10. Larry, YOU ROCK! I have never seen such an exhaustive, informative, totally awesome post regarding infographics. I will most certainly put your information to good work. Thanks for sharing so freely.

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