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The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne

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Ruby Payne is a popular consultant to school districts around the United States and, perhaps, the world. I have major concerns about her “deficit” view of low-income students and their families — it smacks of a “blaming the victim” mentality.

I’ve written extensively about the concept of “blame,” and you might be interested in The Best Resources For Helping Students (& The Rest Of Us) Learn The Concept Of Not Blaming Others.

I thought it might also be important, though, to create a “The Best…” list specifically related to Ms. Payne. Her popularity is a fact (you can read this fawning New York Times Magazine article about her to confirm that statement).

There have been some good critiques written about her, though there have also been ones that are not particularly accessible and written in “academic-ese” and others which I think have been overly ideological. Here’s a comment I left on Scott McLeod’s blog a few years ago during a conversation about Payne:

I agree that the most effective long-term strategy for dealing with many of the problems facing low-income communities (and the children who live in them) is to organize for better housing, employment, health, etc.). I would also add that schools and their staff should work as partners with parents and other local neighborhood institutions to push for those changes.

At the same time, though, I don’t necessarily believe that this kind of strategy is the only avenue to pursue, just as I don’t believe that most teachers are attracted to Ruby Payne’s deficit model because it’s “comfortable.”

I believe that there is much that can be done day-and-day-out in the classroom by teachers. And that many of these teachers are desperate to learn any kind of instructional strategies and classroom management tactics that they can apply effectively to respond to the many challenging situations that can be found in inner-city schools.

Saul Alinsky, the father of modern-day community organizing and the founder of the organization that I worked for during my organizing career, once said, “The price of criticism is a constructive alternative.”

I believe that those of us who are critics of Ruby Payne need to do a far better job of offering constructive alternatives that teachers can use today and tomorrow — right in their classroom — if we want more to see the fallacies of Payne’s approach.

One of the things I try to do in this blog and in my books is to offer practical strategies for teachers to use instead of getting sucked into “blaming the victim.”

But there have been some good accessible critiques written, and I thought I’d share a few of what I think are the best ones:

The Myth of the Culture of Poverty by Paul Gorski at Educational Leadership.

A Framework for Understanding Ruby Payne by Anita Bohn at Rethinking Schools.

Savage Unrealities by Paul Gorski at Rethinking Schools.

Revisiting Ruby Payne by Anita Bohn at Rethinking Schools.

Poverty and Payne: Supporting Teachers to Work with Children of Poverty is by Mistilina Sato and Timothy J. Lensmir.

Shifting from Deficit to Generative Practices: Addressing Impoverished and All Students is by Paul Thomas. And thanks to Paul for helping me find some of the articles on this list.

The Corrosive Power of Stereotypes in Politics and Education is also by Paul Thomas.

Return of the Deficit is by Curt Dudley-Marling.

Questioning Payne is a good piece from Teaching Tolerance.

More resources can be found at Debunking Ruby Payne’s Framework of Poverty.

The Payne of Confronting Stereotypes about Poverty as Educators is by Paul Thomas.

Questioning Payne is from Teaching Tolerance.

Feedback and/or Additional suggestions are always welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the over 800 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

186 Comments

  1. I have read Payne’s work regarding her frame work on poverty. Many sources site her work as being racist, classist and miseducating people about those living in poverty. I can see where the language used and examples given can make for uncomfortable talking points as they seem to target specific minority groups (even if she doesn’t come out and directly name them), but I do like that it opens up the conversation. In reading her work I can’t help but wonder if race and poverty are so interwoven through the generations that we have come to a point where differentiation of the two matters is nearly impossible. Is Payne’s work racist or is it troublesome for us to read because minorities have been in poverty for so long that culture versus socioeconomic status line has become blurred? Clearly our society is in an ugly place right now but it has been running in the undercurrent for decades, even centuries if you will. Can we advance minorities without first addressing poverty, specifically generational poverty caused by racial biases? These are the talking points stirred in me by her work. Honest thoughts and opinions are more than welcome.

  2. I have been a teacher for 23 years and have taught many, many children living in poverty. I’ve always known these children were from impoverished backgrounds but I hate to admit I didn’t really understand what to do about it. I’ve just read two books – one by Ruby Payne and one by Eric Jensen. Both were centered around understanding poverty and what teachers can do to fairly and adequately teach all their students. I don’t necessarily agree with everything I read in the books, but I’ve also been reading online articles from Teaching Tolerance and others. The thing I take away from this is whether you agree with Payne or not, Jensen or not, Gorski or not, TT or not — at least this experience has helped me as an educator to understand my students more. The school I work in hovers around 80% Free and Reduced Lunch, so clearly poverty is well represented. Teachers need to talk about this, need to get help with strategies and need professional development. We have significant needs in our classrooms, behavior problems, mental health problems and need as much support as possible. Please keep this dialogue going. Teachers need help!!!

  3. I recently read Ruby K. Payne’s A Framework for Understanding Poverty: A Cognitive Approach. I feel she makes valid points in terms of the importance of a support system for all students. We should not over-generalize or make a blanket statement in terms of all children living in poverty, middle class, or wealthy; however, there are common trends for each class regardless of race, sex, etc. When children of all different social classes, do not have support systems at home, it is our responsibility as educators to help close that gap and provide the support needed.

  4. While completing a class about the effects of poverty on children, I was required to read “A Framework for Understanding Poverty” and “Teaching With Poverty in Mind”. I found the two books had a common theme of the importance of relationships with students. As another person commented, this is an effective strategy for ALL children. I found Payne’s book to be an interesting read, however I did not find many strategies that I could take into my classroom and use right away. Jensen’s book seemed to have more strategies I could implement right away to help my students.
    I also agree with other people who commented that each situation is different no matter what class you fall into.
    I do think Payne has started conversations about poverty. The pages about casual register and formal register were interesting to ponder. I certainly am considering things I was not considering as an educator before reading these two resources. The conversation and the research continues….

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