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The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity

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Here’s a “The Best…” list offering resources I’ve been accumulating them for awhile on creativity.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons.

I certainly don’t view this as the be all and end all of creativity resources, so I hope readers will contribute more.

Here are my choices for The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity:

How To Be Creative
is an excerpt from Jonah Lehrer’s book (despite it being pulled because of Mr. Lehrer’s made-up quotations from Bob Dylan, I still think he offers useful advice) and appeared in The Wall Street Journal.

Thinking “Inside Out” — How Could I Use This In A Lesson? is a post I wrote, and here’s a follow-up called “The Costanza Gambit.”

Developing Students’ Creative Skills for 21st Century Success is by Jennifer Henderson and is on ASCD’s website.

The Big Lesson of a Little Prince: (Re)capture the Creativity of Childhood is by Maria Konnikova and appeared in Scientific American.

The Kaleidoscope Mind: Some Easy Ways to Teach Creativity appeared in The Atlantic.

A Box? Or a Spaceship? What Makes Kids Creative
is from The Wall Street Journal.

Reclaiming the Imagination
is from The New York Times.

Lab Notes #5: Creativity is from Wired.

Positive Mood Allows Human Brain to Think More Creatively is from Science Daily.

How to encourage big ideas is from MIT News.

TechCrunch has a series of videos on this topic from author Po Bronson.

What you think you know about fostering creativity is wrong. A look at what really works
is a Newsweek article from Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman.

The Creativity Crisis is from Newsweek and is part of the same series.

“The Creativity Crisis”: A Conversation with Nurture Shock Author Ashley Merryman is from Learning First.

Creativity Lessons from Charles Dickens and Steve Jobs is from The Harvard Business Review.

How Geniuses Think is from The Creativity Post.

Education and Creativity is from The Creative Research Journal.

Research summary – fostering creativity is from Journey To Excellence.

How Creative Are You? is an online test from Newsweek.

Here are some interesting articles on measuring creativity:

States Mulling Creativity Indexes for Schools is from Education Week.

Measuring Creativity is from The European Commission.

Will Measuring Creativity In Schools Help Youth Be Workforce Ready? is from The Huffington Post.

Can Creativity Be Measured?

Interesting Research On Creativity

Jonah Lehrer, author of the book “Imagine: How Creativity Works” has written a guest piece over at my Education Week Teacher column sharing his suggestions on how his research can be applied in the classroom.

Thanks to Brain Pickings, I’ve discovered these two videos about his book. I’m adding them to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity:

Salvador Dali’s Creative Thinking Technique is from The Creativity Post.

Linking Prior Knowledge and New Content with Metaphors is by Jason Buell at ASCD In Service Blog.

Assessing creativity is from The Blue Skunk Blog.

30 Things You Can Do To Promote Creativity in Your Classroom is from InformED.

Creativity Now! is the theme of the February 2013 issue of ASCD Educational Leadership, and it’s a good one.

Several are behind a paywall, but here are some great ones that are freely available now:

I especially like Assessing Creativity by Susan M. Brookhart.

Creativity on the Brink? is by Alane Starko.

Creativity Requires a Mix of Skills is by Bryan Goodwin and Kirsten Miller.

Fundamentals of Creativity is by Ronald A. Beghetto and James C. Kaufman.

This video demonstrates both the disadvantages of extrinsic motivation and the importance of helping our students develop creativity:

Learning To Think Outside The Box is an article in The New York Times about creativity. The article briefly discusses research, but an online test it provides for users to evaluated their own creativity is particularly interesting. It also has additional multimedia resources.

Feel free to offer feedback and additional suggestions.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the previous 900  “The Best…” lists and also consider subscribing to this blog for free.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

6 Comments

  1. Here are some other books:

    Teaching and Helping Students Think and Do Better

    Rational Thinking, Government Policies, Science, and Living

  2. Pingback: WorkingAtTheEdge.org Daily Links 06/01/2012 | Working at the edge

  3. Jonah Lehrer’s book is fantastic. The only chapter I found problematic was the one on urban friction. His conclusions are a reach. However, I’m likely biased, as I live in a rural region.

  4. I’m not usually big on self-promotion but you might want to take a look at my blog creativiteach.me since it focuses specifically on developing students’ creativity. For the summer I’ll be doing more discussion of home activities, but you may find some useful things there. When I saw your list (which I really liked) I thought it wouldn’t hurt to bring creativiteach.me to your attention, since it is relatively new. Thanks!

  5. Pingback: Jeff Piontek: Author + Speaker + Teacher » Several Ways We Can Help Students Develop Their Creativity

  6. Pingback: Response: Several Ways We Can Help Students Develop Their Creativity | Committed Sardine Blog

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