Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

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The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice

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'Mort & Dwane, 10,000 hrs' photo (c) 2013, SDASM Archives - license: http://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

Be sure to check out my interview with Daniel Coyle, author of “The Talent Code,” at Education Week Teacher.

Jonah Lehrer provides a good description of the “10,000 hour rule”:

The 10,000 hour rule has become a cliche. This is the idea, first espoused by K. Anders Ericsson, a pyschologist at Florida State University, that it takes about 10,000 hours of practice before any individual can become an expert. The corollary of this rule is that that differences in talent reflect differences in the amount and style of practice, and not differences in innate ability. As Ericsson wrote in his influential review article “The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance”: “The differences between expert performers and normal adults are not immutable, that is, due to genetically prescribed talent. Instead, these differences reflect a life-long period of deliberate effort to improve performance.”

Here are my choices for The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberative Practice:

I’ve written a post titled Sorry, Professors: Deliberate Practice Matters.

Deliberate Practice – Pt. 1: Knowing exactly what you want is from Psychology Today.

Is it true that 10,000 hours of practice will make you an expert at something? is from Barking Up The Wrong Tree.

Are you experienced? Does it matter? is from Mind Hacks.

The Science of Experience is from TIME Magazine.

How much does natural talent control what you can achieve in life? is from Barking Up The Wrong Tree.

The Power of Practice is by Mark Sanborn.

Freakonomics has three good posts:

How Did A-Rod Get So Good?

Deliberate Practice: How Education Fails to Produce Expertise

The Science of Genius: A Q&A With Author David Shenk

Six Keys to Being Excellent at Anything is from The Harvard Business Review.

The Secret of Great Men: Deliberate Practice is an unfortunate title, but it has good information.

Deliberate Practice: How to Develop Expertise is from The Science Of Learning.

How Do You Get to Carnegie Hall? 8 Keys to Deliberate Practice. is from Mission to Learn.

Benjamin Franklin and deliberate practice is from Anecdote.

Guitar Zero: can science turn a psychologist into Jimi Hendrix? is from The Guardian.

The Grandmaster in the Corner Office: What the Study of Chess Experts Teaches Us about Building a Remarkable Life is from Study Hacks.

Talent or Practice – What Matters More? is by David Shenk

Talent or Practice – What Matters More? is by Gary Marcus.

Ray Allen Scores in the Nature-Nurture Debate

Is it true that 10,000 hours of practice will make you an expert at something? is from Barking Up The Wrong Tree.

What is Deliberate Practice is from Farnam Street.

Deliberate Practice Infographic

Why talent is overrated is from CNN.

The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance is the original paper on the idea.

Very Interesting (& Different) Post On “Fixed” Versus “Growth” Mindsets

Applying science to the teaching of science is from The Economist.

Six Keys to Being Excellent at Anything is from The Harvard Business Review.

Why Gladwell’s 10,000-hour rule is wrong is from The BBC.

10,000 Hours May Not Make a Master After All is from TIME.

The Complexity of Greatness: Beyond Talent or Practice is from Scientific American.

The Complexity of Greatness: Beyond Talent or Practice is from Creativity Post.

Becoming a Better Teacher by ‘Deliberate Practice’ is from huntingenglish.

How to Stop Being Allergic to Practice is by Daniel Coyle.

What’s Your LQ (Learning Quotient)? is also from Daniel Coyle.

Deliberate Practice, Myelin & The Brain

Quote Of The Day: “Complexity and the Ten-Thousand-Hour Rule”

New Studies Highlight Blurry Line Between Nature & Nurture

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect by Daniel Goleman might be the best short and accessible article on the concept that I’ve found. I’m definitely using it with my students.

WHY “DELIBERATE PRACTICE” IS THE ONLY WAY TO KEEP GETTING BETTER is from Fast Company.

Can 10,000 hours of practice make you an expert? is from The BBC.

Two Things Experts Do Differently Than Non-Experts When Practicing is from The Creativity Post.

Are Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 Hours of Practice Really All You Need? is from National Geographic.

Big New Study On Deliberate Practice

We’ve Been Thinking About Talent The Wrong Way All Along is by Daniel Coyle.

Actually, practice doesn’t always make perfect — new study is by Alfie Kohn.

All feedback is welcome.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

5 Comments

  1. Thank you SO VERY MUCH for this post. I’ve spent many hours (not 10k, yet) studying Ericsson’s work, but always looking for more.

    Side note: I wish they had not called it “deliberate practice” which sounds an awful lot like “practice that is deliberate”, which could so easily be misinterpreted to mean nearly ANY practice. Ericsson’s use of Deliberate Practice is quite precise and narrow, and though I don’t have a good optional label, my husband and I refer to it as “edge practice”. Qualifying practice with “edge” at least gets you closer to the actual meaning, vs. just that it is “deliberate”.

    Sideways note: I have been exploring and experimenting with applying “deliberate/edge practice” principles to training horses, mapping some of Ericsson’s work as closely as I can to the things I am asking horse athletes to do. It has a profound effect, though keeping them motivated is tricky, given that edge work, by design and definition, is the most challenging and tedious of all forms of practice. Which brings me back to… finding and using what is *intrinsically* motivating when possible, and using extrinsic motivators for the things that will never be implicitly pleasurable.

    Given how against the broad application of extrinsic rewards I am, deliberate/edge practice is the one area where it makes a lot of sense, and has a low risk of being harmful. But for most humans, by the time you become truly committed to something enough to willfully engage in deliberate practice, y no longer need extrinsic rewards because you moved up the continuum to “integration”… as in the athlete that chooses to do the less-fun thing today in order to prepare for the intrinsically rewarding thing they LOVE — the sport they’ll be participating in tomorrow. (integrated motivation in athletes and other motivated students is also covered well by Deci and Ryan)

  2. Larry,

    Sharing this article – The Expert Mind. A great though dense read about the importance of how we are made and become rather than just are talented or not.

    http://www.cerebyte.com/articles/Scientific%20American%20Neuroplasticity.pdf
    originally from Scientific American

  3. That’s a lot of resources. In the end it seems like 10000 hours would make someone inevitably good! Thanks!

  4. Pingback: MiddleWeb's Latest Middle Grades Education Resources | MiddleWeb

  5. Pingback: Becoming a Better Teacher by ‘Deliberate Practice’ | huntingenglish

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