Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

The Best Comic Strips For Students & Teachers In 2012 — So Far

| 3 Comments

This is probably by last “so far” The Best list. I’ll be posting end-of-the-year editions in December.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Comic Strips For Students & Teachers In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Comic Strips For Students & Teachers — 2010

The Best Comic Strips For Students & Teachers — 2010 (And Earlier)

Of course, teachers and students can also make their own comic strips. Check out The Best Ways To Make Comic Strips Online.

Feel free to add your own favorites in the comments section of this post.

Here are my picks for The Best Comic Strips For Students & Teachers In 2012– So Far:

As I’ve written in The Best Posts About Attrition Rates At So-Called “Miracle” Schools:

Periodically, President Obama, Secretary of Education Duncan, or various newspapers will highlight so-called “miracle” schools (often charters) that have made quick and dramatic gains in test scores or graduation rates. The message is — since they can do it, why can’t the rest of us? Often, however, the student attrition rates behind those achievements are ignored. In other words, these schools often don’t make these gains with the same students, or they really don’t have a 100% graduation rate if you look at who they started with…

I was reminded of this when reading the Pickles comic strip:

You can make the data look pretty good if you make sure the “water’s frozen over” before you report the numbers….

Some good classroom management advice from the Baby Blues comic strip (see “Be Niiiiiicccccceeeee” for an example).

There Are Dangers To Always Doing What You’re Told To Do….:

A message from the comic strip Non-Sequitur:

Source: gocomics.com via Larry on Pinterest

Extrinsic motivation has been shown to work for more mechanical tasks (not higher-ordering thinking), so this comic strip might model a successful strategy in this instance :)

This Pickles comic strip reminds me of some school reform schemes, like merit pay. They’ve never been shown to work, and never will. But that doesn’t seem to stop the reformers from expecting to see “apples.”

Source: gocomics.com via Larry on Pinterest

This Dilbert comic strip gives a good example of how it seems some “school reformers” view the idea of “teacher leadership.”

Here are some examples of what I believe teacher leadership is:

TEDxNYED – April 28, 2012 – Jose Vilson

International Inspiration for Building Teacher Leadership

TEACHING 2030

This “Pickles” comic strip has many applications to education. Often, in the classroom, we might see a issue needing a solution — a student needing to develop a greater capacity for self-control, a reluctant reader, etc. — and wonder why our solutions (punishment, etc.) don’t work. One reason might be because we’re applying the wrong “tool.”

The same is true for many school reform ideas — merit pay, a longer school day, more standardized testing. These tools are not the right ones for the job.

The message from this Non Sequitur comic strip is something that might be useful for us to keep in mind — What Seems Like An Easy Span To Us Might Look Like A Dangerous Crossing To Our Students:

We teachers might want to keep this Luann comic strip in mind:

Source: gocomics.com via Larry on Pinterest

Another good Dilbert comic — This Is A Good Example Of Being A Bad Instructional Coach:

Dilbert.com

Here’s Another Reason Why It’s Important For Our Students To Understand Idioms:

Ad2aa6c00cb5012f2fc500163e41dd5b?width=900

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 900 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

Print Friendly

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

3 Comments

  1. Do you recall this comic strip from a while ago? For a couple of frames it went something like this: “I hate school.” “The kids are mean to me.” “I don’t want to go back.” The setup had us thinking this was a kid but it was a teacher. Any pointers to that? Thanks.

  2. Loved these comic strips. In school i have to make a comic strip also for a computer class to pass. Do you have any ideas or tips that could help make this project easier?

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *.