Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

A Potpourri Of The Best & Most Useful Video Sites

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'Voyeurism.' photo (c) 2009, Renato Ganoza - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I’ve been accumulating a variety of online video sites that don’t quite fit into my extensive list of previous “The Best…” lists related to videos. So, I’ve decided to make a “potpourri” list and, within it, include links to all my previous lists, too.

First, I’ll links to my older lists. Later in this post, you’ll find a variety of other useful video links.

Here are all my “The Best” lists related to videos:

The Best Online Instructional Video Sites
The Best Online Video Sites For Learning English
The Best Ways For Students To Create Online Videos (Using Someone Else’s Content)
The Best Ways To Access Educational YouTube Videos At School
The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL
The Best Sites That Use Movie Trailers To Teach English
The Best Sites For News & History Videos That Won’t Be Blocked By Content Filter (At Least, Not By Ours!)
The Best Places To Find Theatrical Movies On Science, Math & History
The Best Online Videos Showing ESL/EFL Teachers In The Classroom
The Best Ways To Find Fun (& Somewhat Useful) Videos On The Web
The Best Places To Learn About (And View Video Clips Of) Teachers In The Movies
The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development
Not The “Best,” But A List… Of Online Video Editors
The Best Tools For Cutting-Out & Saving Portions Of Online Videos
The Best Applications For Sending Online Video Messages
The Best Ways To Create Online Video Playlists
The Best Sources For Advice On Using Flip Video Cameras
The Best (& Easiest) Ways To Record Online Video Interviews
The Best YouTube Channels For Learning English
The Best Videos For Educators In 2011 — So Far
The Best Places On The Web To Find Documentaries (Non-YouTube)
The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — So Far
The Best Video Clips Of Sneaky Critters — Help Me Find More
The Best — And Easiest — Ways To Use YouTube If, Like Us, Only Teachers Have Access To It

And here is my “potpourri” list:

Teachem lets you very easily create questions that are attached to specific moments in any YouTube video that people can answer. It would be ideal for students to use to create “tests” for their classmates. However, you can only use YouTube videos, which means it’s fairly useful for schools. When they open it up to other videos, then it could come in quite handly. Thanks to Richard Byrne for the tip.

Vialogues lets you create discussion boards for videos.

Amara lets you easily create subtitles for videos.

Watch2gether lets you create a private virtual room where you can watch videos together with a text chat box. No registration is required, but you can only watch videos on YouTube.

Remix web video with Popcorn Maker, launching is the title of a TED blog post describing Mozilla’s new free tool that lets you remix and annotate media. It looks pretty interesting. It isn’t the sort of tool you can use within a minute of learning about it, which is what I prefer, but it probably doesn’t require that much time to learn how to use it.

Here’s a video on it from Mozilla:

HapYak lets you annotate any YouTube or Vimeo video with text (including url addresses) or freestyle drawing. The Adventures With Technology blog has an interesting lesson plan using HapYak with second language learners.

More Than Just Bill Nye… Using Video in the Classroom is a post from Mss L’s Whole Brain Teaching blog.

Dos and Don’ts for Successful Web Videos is an excellent guide from The New York Times.

Wirewax lets you add interactive tags to videos. You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s post.

The Mad Video is a slightly different way to make interactive tags for videos. Again, you can read Richard Byrne’s post about it.

Nicer Tube lets you show YouTube videos without the usual screen clutter or comments.

Video Notes is an intriguing note-taking tool. Here’s how Next Web describes it:

It’s as simple as this: sign in with a Google account (VideoNotes uses Google Drive for storage) and then paste in the URL for a YouTube or Coursera video. Then as it plays you can start making notes on the right-hand side of the screen. The clever bit is that as you click on previous notes you’ve made, the video will jump to that point, making this a really useful tool for navigating documentaries, study guides and other long, involved videos.

Soo Meta lets you combine segments of videos, text, tweets and images into one presentation. One nice feature is that you can easily grab those items off the Web through a simple search option (though, for me, the image search wasn’t working). You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog and at 10,000 Words, which called it a “Storify For Video.”

eduCanon is a new site that lets teachers create video lessons relatively easily, along with have a virtual classroom where you can monitor student responses to questions you include in the lesson (thanks to TechCrunch for the tip).

If You Don’t Have Teacher Access To YouTube At Your School, Then This Search Engine is a “Must”

Three Tools for Improving Flipped Video Lessons is a new post from Richard Byrne.

You can print the “storyboard” (the different video frames) from any YouTube video with Print YouTube.

Teacher Training Videos has an excellent tutorial on using YouTube.

EDpuzzle Is An Innovative Video Site

Creating and Using Video is by Edublogs’ Sue Waters, and is one of the most useful posts I’ve seen this year about helping students create online content. It’s very complete, and shares many examples.

Clip Choose is a new tool that lets you create YouTube playlists and have people vote for their favorite. Ozge Karaoglu has posted some good ideas on how to use it with students.

10 video calling apps to connect you with family and friends this Christmas is from The Next Web.

Curious.com lets you create, share and view video lessons.

Five-Minute Film Festival: 8 Interactive Video Tools for Engaging Learners is from Edutopia.

“Tools for flipping your class”

Zaption looks like a useful tool for creating interactive videos for students. Here’s a video describing it:

ThingLink Now Lets You Annotate Videos, Too

The Learnia Video Whiteboard lets you turn your lessons into videos.

Comment Bubble lets you have a virtual discussion via comments on any video. You can read more about it at Ozge Karaoglu’s Blog.

Nearpod is yet another tool for teachers to use to create multimedia presentations.

Additional suggestions are always welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the over 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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