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The Best Resources About The March On Washington

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'Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. [A wide-angle view of marchers along the mall, showing the Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument.], 08/28/1963' photo (c) 1963, The U.S. National Archives - license: http://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

The fiftieth anniversary of The March On Washington is coming up later this month, so I thought readers would appreciated bringing together a collection of resources that I’ll be adding to as the day grows even closer.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King

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The Best Sites To Learn About The Greensboro Sit-Ins (It’s The Fiftieth Anniversary)

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Here are my beginning choices for The Best Resources About The March On Washington:

TIME Magazine has an impressive multimedia collection on the anniversary.

The Albert Shanker Institute has many good lesson plans on the March.

The History Channel has a number of related resources.

The 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington Lesson Plan: A History of Discrimination and Its Consequences comes from The PBS News Hour.

Four ways to beat ‘The Man’ is from CNN.

Remembering the March is from USA Weekend.

Claiming and Teaching the 1963 March on Washington is from The Zinn Education Project.

At 1963 March, A Face In The Crowd Became A Poster Child is from NPR.

His Dreams, Our Stories is an impressive site from Comcast.

The Washington Post has a huge amount of related resources.

There’s an official March on Washington anniversary website with lots of info and multimedia.

50 Years Later, Youth Reflect on Race in America and MLK’s Dream
is from The PBS News Hour.

A Momentous Day Driven by Ordinary People is a NY Times photo gallery.

Witnesses to History, 50 Years Later is a great interactive from The New York Times.

“Did You Know?” Myths and Facts About the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom is from Teaching For Change.

What Do Asian-Americans Owe The Civil Rights Movement? is from NPR.

PBS has additional multimedia resources.

President Obama has made some comments on the March’s anniversary.

The National Education Association has a lot of resources.

Thousands Gather In D.C. To Mark 1963 Civil Rights March is from NPR.

Thousands march on Washington to remember Martin Luther King’s dream is from The Guardian.

I’m embedding John Lewis’ speech from the anniversary march below:

Scenes From the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington is from The New York Times.

Following King’s Path, and Trying to Galvanize a New Generation is also from The New York Times.

Here’s a link to my favorite image from the Anniversary March.

Why the march anniversary matters—especially for whites is from The Washington Post.

I previously posted a video of John Lewis’ speech at the fiftieth anniversary of the March On Washington.

Here’s a video of his speech at the original march:

Rep. John Lewis’ Speech at the 1963 March on Washington from BillMoyers.com on Vimeo.

Five myths about the March on Washington is from The Washington Post.

Teaching the Movement, Beyond Four Famous Words is from Teaching Tolerance.

The relationship between Cesar Chavez and Martin Luther King, Jr. is by the President of the United Farm Workers Union.

50 years after King, hidden racism lives on is from CNN.

This Is the Day: Historic March On Washington – in pictures is from The Guardian.

Immigration reform activists seize on ‘moral tone’ of civil rights movement is from NBC News.

I Have A Dream

Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Martin Luther King: ‘I have a dream’ revisited is a cool interactive from the BBC.

We Are Still Marching is an even cooler interactive that allows you to hear and record King’s speech.

The Guardian has a neat interactive on King’s speech, too.

March on Washington Inspires Educators, 50 Years Later is from Education Week.

You’ve got to watch this interview with John Lewis. You can read the transcript here.

Here’s a video of President Obama’s speech today on the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. You can read a transcript here.

Here’s a Wordle of “Obama speech at March on Washington, Aug. 28, 2013”

50th Anniversary of the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech is an Associated Press interactive.

Voices for Equality is a video selection from The New York Times of “A selection of speeches since Martin Luther King Jr.’s address at the Lincoln Monument on Aug. 28, 1963, that have influenced the perceptions of race in America.”

Six amazing photos from the 1963 March on Washington is from The Washington Post.

These ten charts show the black-white economic gap hasn’t budged in 50 years is also from The Washington Post.

Ten charts show how the U.S. has changed for the better since MLK’s speech is from The Washington Post.

50 Years of the Civil-Rights Movement—in 10 Charts is from The Daily Beast.

President Obama shows the progress we’ve made. His speech shows how terribly we’ve failed. is from The Washington Post.

Revisiting Martin Luther King’s 1963 Dream speech

Watch Full Episode on PBS. See more from The March.

Organizing Manuals for the March on Washington is from The Wall Street Journal.

The ‘Dream,’ Then and Now is a split screen photo gallery from the Wall Street Journal.

A half-century after the ‘dream’: 10 signposts on America’s race journey is from CNN.

The Unfinished March on Washington is from Bill Moyers website.

NBC/WSJ poll: Many Americans say King’s dream hasn’t become a reality yet is from NBC News.

The Misremembering of ‘I Have a Dream’ is from The Nation.

This is just a small beginning of a list. Please feel free to contribute more!

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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