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More “What If?” History Projects — Plus, What Students Thought Of Them….

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Last week, I shared a few of the “What If?” history project my IB Theory of Knowledge students created and added them to The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons.

Students just completed a simple evaluation of the project, and I thought readers might be interested in what they thought of it. As my IB students have done in previous years, they are teaching my English Language Learners how to do it, too, so I’ll also be sharing those presentations in a few days.

But, before I share my IB students’ comments, I thought I’d share one more of their PowerPoints:

Here are their evaluations:

What did you like or not like about the project and why?

I liked doing this project because it led me to imagine the world today with events changed.

I liked it because it was fun.

I didn’t like it because it wasn’t really fun.

I really liked doing the project because it allowed me to work with others I hadn’t worked with yet.

I liked it because it was a great way to see how things would have been different.

I liked it because we had fun and used creativity to create events that never happened.

What could be done to improve it?

Most people said “we could have used one more day to prepare.”

It was pretty cool. I really don’t know what could be better.

What did you learn about history?

I was able to understand the significance of an event and how it plays a role in the way our lives are today. I learned to appreciate and be grateful for these events, because if they never occurred I wouldn’t be here right now or possibly my life may be extremely different.

I did learn about history and how a small event can easily change the future. Anything can change our lives in the future.

I learned that history always has a cause and effect rule to it.

History is built up depending on who writes or sees it.

I learned about many different perspectives of history. Also, what I thought up as a consequence/effect, others didn’t…

 

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

2 Comments

  1. Have you seen the Benchmarks of Historical Thinking? They identify the way in which historians think (habits of mind of experts) and help students develop this conceptual framework for their work in history. I use them with my grade 4/5 gifted education class with great success and student engagement. As with all good pedagogy, the student is given the model and uses it to draw their own conclusions within the expectations of the project.

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