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The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2017 – So Far

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I’ve created a public Twitter list of IB Theory of Knowledge teachers. Send a tweet to me letting me know you’re an IB teacher, or leave a comment on this post, and I’ll add you to the list!

It’s time for another “Best” list to add to All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place.

I’ll also be adding this post to All Of My Theory Of Knowledge “Best” Lists In One Place!

Here are my previous TOK-related “Best” lists:

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources — 2010

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – So Far

The Best Commentaries On The New IB Theory Of Knowledge Teaching Guide

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Movies For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes – What Are Your Suggestions?

The Best Posts On IB Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Posts On Teaching TOK “Knowledge Questions”

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2016 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2016 – Part Two

Here are my picks from the past six months:

Read, Listen, Watch New Orleans Mayor’s Speech On The Removal Of Confederate Monuments

This new PBS News Hour segment would be great for an IB Theory of Knowledge class or any Social Studies course to initiate a discussion of what is worth remembering/memorializing and for what reason:

“History does not move on the machinations of a select group of great people”

The Best Resources For Learning About Cognitive Bias

This is a very interesting short video.

It would be useful in IB Theory of Knowledge class when we examine math and statistics.

And it would also be helpful in science classes.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

Here’s an excellent and practical interpretation of IB’s rubric for the Theory of Knowledge oral presentation (I’m adding it to The Best Posts On IB Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations):

Speaking of IB Theory of Knowledge Oral Presentations, this is a video of Michelle’s presentation. She’s given me permission to share it here.

I’m giving her a 7 on the (in my opinion) somewhat weird IB Presentation Rubric.

What do you think? (by the way, you can find all our class materials on the Oral Presentation, including many other videos, here).

I’m adding this new video to our Theory of Knowledge class blog post exploring Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. That post also includes student-created videos of modern versions of the Allegory:

3 ways to spot a bad statistic is the title of data journalist Mona Chalabi’s new TED Talk (you can see the TED Talk video and transcript here).

I think it would be fine to skip the first few minutes of it, but after the first five minutes she does a great job teaching about how statistics can mislead. Even better, she includes examples related to pee and poop, so you know students are going to be engaged 🙂

It would be great to show IB Theory of Knowledge classes when studying math and/or human sciences.

Here’s the YouTube version of the talk:

Richard Byrne, who I assume everybody who is reading this blog knows and reads, shared this video last month. He wrote about using it when teaching about social media browsing.

I plan on adding it to a series of videos I use in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when learning about perception.

You can see all those videos at Videos: Here’s The Simple Theory of Knowledge Lesson On Perception I Did Today.

TOK and “fake news”: 3 tips, 2 downloads, and 3 resources is a helpful resource for Theory of Knowledge and other classes. I’m adding it to The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy – Help Me Find More.

I might be the last person in the world to learn about the “Google Explore” feature that was integrated into Google Docs last fall. You can read all about it here. There’s a little button on the bottom right of a Google Doc. Click on it and, as you write, related search items appear in a column. My Theory of Knowledge students found it useful while working on their Oral Presentation outlines and essays.

Here Are Some Of The Knowledge Questions My TOK Students Are Using For Oral Presentations This Year

The Simple “New Paradigm Project” We Did In Theory Of Knowledge Class (& Which Could Be Done In Other Classes, Too)

Four New Resources On Indigenous Peoples

New Study: The Milgram Experiment Is Replicated

Exemplar Slideshows For Our “Ways Of Knowing” Project

I’m adding this new video from Wireless Philosophy to The Best Online Resources For Teaching The Difference Between Correlation & Causation:

The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

Here’s My Absolutism/Relativism Project For TOK – Help Me Make It Better

New “What If?” History Presentations

“What If?” History Projects

Though I’ve not been a fan of all of Derek Sivers’ videos (see my article, Dancing Guy Doesn’t Teach Good Leadership Lessons), I like this short one that Jen Adkins, my talented colleague at school, showed me this year.

It was made in 2009, but I don’t remember seeing it before.  I think it would be useful in many situations, including IB Theory of Knowledge classes:

Why cute baby animal photos are actually toying with your brainfrom The Washington Post is great for use in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when studying perception.

Play-Doh & IB Theory Of Knowledge: Student Hand-Out & Videos

TED-Ed has just released a new lesson and video on the famous Trolley Problem.

The Trolley Problem, of course, is a key part of any discussion of Ethics in an IB Theory of Knowledge classroom, which is why I have a The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” list.

When we study Perception in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes, I ask students how they would describe the color red to someone who has never had vision. This new video just was published:

Here’s a new and short video on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

I’m not sure if it’s necessary to use a video to teach the Hierarchy, but it could be a nice change-of-pace. Most Theory of Knowledge include it in the course, particularly when covering Human Sciences.

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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