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The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – Part Two

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This is the first in my annual year-end “Best” lists (you can find all 1,700 Best lists here).

In addition, you can find All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part One ; The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner ; The Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators ; The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More ; The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More! ;  The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More ; The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” and The Best Videos For Teaching & Learning About Figurative Language.

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Showing Good & Bad Classroom Discussions

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos About The Importance Of Practice – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos Explaining Gravitational Waves (In An Accessible Way)

The Best Random Acts Of Kindness Videos

The Best Videos For Learning About Civil Disobedience

The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

I’ve also written a guest post for Edutopia titled 5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Videos for ELL Classrooms. You might find it useful.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – Part Two (some may have been produced prior to this year, but are just new to me):

I know that many educators have read the book “Made To Stick,” by by Chip Heath and Dan Heath.

Here’s a nice summary of it:

A brief history of banned numbers is a new lesson and video from TED-Ed.

Its content reminded me of when the then-military dictatorship governing Argentina banned the use of Venn Diagrams in school. You can read more about that story at The Best Multimedia Resources For Introducing Students To The Advantages Of Charts, Graphs & Infographics.

The PBS News Hour did this video segment interviewing Angie Thomas, the author of the amazing book, The Hate You Give:

I’m adding this brand-new StoryCorps animated video to The Best Resources To Learn About The Vietnam War.

Here’s how they describe it:

After being drafted in 1969, Tom Geerdes served as an Army medic in the 11th Armored Cavalry in Vietnam and Cambodia. Like many veterans, he returned home a changed man. At StoryCorps, Tom shared his long journey toward healing with his daughter, Hannah Campbell.

Space X released a blooper rule of their past failures.

You can see the original here, but I like this edited version from Tech Insider better because it provides more context:

I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

TED-Ed has published this lesson and video. I’m adding it to:

The Best Videos Documenting The History Of The English Language

You might also be interested in The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2016.

Teaching Adolescents to Become Learners: The Role of Noncognitive Factors in Shaping School Performance is an important report that The University of Chicago Consortium on School Research issued a few years ago.

It’s on The Best Summaries/Reviews Of Research On Social Emotional Learning – Let Me Know What I’ve Missed list.

More recently, though, they created this three minute summary of the report’s results. It’s well done and is worth viewing:

Noncognitive Factors from UChicago UEI on Vimeo.

I’m adding this new video from NPR to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

The last part of that list has resources specifically focused on the need for more teachers of color.

A short clip from this video has been making the rounds on social media recently.

I could definitely see showing the first six minutes in class and asking students to reflect on how it might, and might not, connect to events that we are experiencing today.

Here’s a description of the video:

Don’t Be a Sucker! is a short educational film produced by the U.S. War Department in 1943 and re-released in 1947. The film depicts the rise of Nazism in Germany and warns Americans against repeating the mistakes of intolerance made in Nazi Germany. It emphasizes that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into “suckers” by the forces of fanaticism and hatred.

You can read more about the film at this Atlantic article about it.

 

The PBS News Hour included this commentary from author Grace Lin.

I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

Here’s a nice video from Jo Boaler on a growth mindset and its impact on the brain. It specifically talks about math, but would be useful in any subject.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning

Harry Fletcher-Wood shared this video on Twitter.

I’m adding it to The Best Funny Movie/TV Clips Of Bad Teachers.

I think this is a simple and neat video.

I’m wondering if English Language Learner students could somehow apply this same idea to representing words they are learning? If so, how? What video-creation tool would work? What do readers think?

Words from Enle Li on Vimeo.

I’m adding this new video to The Best Sites To Learn About Street Gangs:

TED-Ed has released this video (and lesson) perfect for IB Theory of Knowledge classes (and for a lot of other courses, too):

ELL teacher Valentina Gonzalez created this video.

Here’s how she describes it:

This video demonstrates instruction that is made comprehensible and instruction that is not comprehensible. The demo uses a different language so viewers can feel what an EL may experience in the classroom.

I think any teacher who has an English Language Learner in his/her class can benefit from watching it. I’ll certainly be using it in the ELL Methods class I teacher in University teacher education programs.

I’m adding it to The Best Videos For Content Teachers With ELLs In Their Classes – Please Suggest More.

I’ve written several posts about the “constraints principle” and how I use it in the classroom (see The “Constraints Principle” Revisited).

TED-Ed unveiled a new lesson and video related to this idea.

I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity.

Thanks to Renee Moore, I learned about the video of a 1967 address Martin Luther King, Jr. gave to junior high school students in Philadelphia.

It’s titled “What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” and I haven’t been able to find a full transcript on line.  Here’s a very partial one, but much is missing.  A full transcript apparently is available in a book.

It’s impressive, to say the least, and would be very useful in class:

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King.

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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