Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – Part Two

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Here’s one more in my series of end-of-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,700 of the lists here).

You might also be interested in these previous posts:

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 — So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Social Studies Sites

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – So Far

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) Related To Social Studies In One Place

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2011

The Best “The Best…” Lists Related To Social Studies — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2009

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2008

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017— Part Two (I’ll begin by sharing links to recent “Best” lists on Social Studies-related topics):

The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The Santa Rosa Fires (& How To Help Victims)

The Best Sites For Learning About Weather

The Best Videos Explaining “Intersectionality”

The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The National Anthem Protests

The Best Resources For Learning About The “Little Rock 9”

The Best Resources For Learning About The Rohingya Refugee Crisis

The Best Resources For Examining “Privilege”

The Best – Or, At Least, The Most Interesting – Resources About Ben Franklin

The Best Resources For Learning & Teaching About Malcolm X

A Beginning List For Learning About The 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics

A Beginning List For Learning About The 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics

The Best Resources For Teaching About Confederate Monuments

The Best Sites Where Students Can Transcribe Historical Texts

The Best Resources For Learning About Proposed Changes To U.S. “Legal” Immigration Policy

The Best Resources For Learning About Hurricane Harvey

The Best Ways To Help Victims Of Hurricane Harvey

Resources For Learning About #Charlottesville

Woolly Mammoths & Inductive Learning

U.S. History Students Creating A “Buffalo Hide Painting” – Lesson & Student Hand-Out

Here’s What My ELL Students Are Reading & Writing About Columbus

Important Advice For White Educators (& Others)

The New York Times shares some wild charts showing the economic “inequality is out of control.” You can check them at out at Our Broken Economy, in One Simple Chart. Here’s an excerpt from the column:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.

At The Best “Lists Of Lists” Of Influential People, Events & Ideas, I share what the headline says, plus resources on the “most important” documents and “objects. Now, The Atlantic has come up with an interesting addition: What Was the Most Important Letter in History? They have a number of nominations, ranging from the obvious (“Letter From Birmingham Jail”) to the not-so-obvious (“The “Groans of the Britons” letter, sent circa 450 a.d. by ancient Britons”).

ProPublica has used a recent study on immigration and created a a very useful interactive called The Immigration Effect. With it, you can modify immigration policy and see it’s impact on the U.S. economy. Here’s an excerpt from their article about the study:

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

Sacred Places, Sacred Ways is a nice interactive map to five places “revered” by some of the world’s key religions.

I have several interactive maps at The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day that show the flow of refugees around the world. They tend to be confusing – at least, to me. The University of Zurich, though, has developed a new one called Refugee Movements which is clean, clear and easy to use.  The screenshot at the top of this post shows its interface, and the site has a slider at the bottom that lets you change the years.

Google has supported the development of a brand-new site created by the Equal Justice Initiative called Lynching In America. It includes multi-media resources and maps, along with discussions on how it relates to criminal justice today. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Teach About African-American History.

Thanks to Renee Moore, I learned about the video of a 1967 address Martin Luther King, Jr. gave to junior high school students in Philadelphia. It’s titled “What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” and I haven’t been able to find a full transcript on line.  Here’s a very partial one, but much is missing.  A full transcript apparently is available in a book. It’s impressive, to say the least, and would be very useful in class:

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King.

Stanford has a new impressive climate change curriculum.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and Google have created an interactive Searching For Syria site providing an excellent overview of the Syrian War and its refugee crisis.  You can read more about it at TechCrunch. I’m adding it to:

The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day

The Best Resources For Learning About What’s Happening In Syria

Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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