KlausHausmann / Pixabay

 

As The New York Times writes:

Four hundred years ago, on August 20, 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in Jamestown. Though America did not even exist yet, their arrival marked its foundation, the beginning of the system of slavery on which the country was built.

There will be a lot of new resources coming online over the next two weeks, and I’ll be adding the best additions to this list.

You might also be interested in my “Best” lists related to race and racism, particularly A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Teaching About Reparations.

Here is what I have so far:

US slavery: How is America marking the 400th anniversary? is from The BBC.

A History of Slavery in the United States is from National Geographic.

The 1619 anniversary of Africans in the United States is significant but not the whole story is from Quartz.

1619: 400 years ago, a ship arrived in Virginia, bearing human cargo is from USA Today.

Ghana marks 400 years since American slave trade is from Al Jazeera.

 

The Atlantic Slave Trade in Two Minutes

Trans Atlantic Slave Trade Visualization

SlaveVoyages.org

Artifacts of the slave trade is from Reuters.

A terrible passage from Africa is from Reuters.

The 1619 Project from The NY Times is edited by Nikole Hannah-Jones, and is an amazing interactive:

The 1619 Project is a major initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.

TWO NEW & INCREDIBLY USEFUL LESSON COLLECTIONS FOR TEACHING ABOUT AMERICAN SLAVERY

TWO VIDEO INTERVIEWS WITH NIKOLE HANNAH-JONES ABOUT THE NY TIMES’ “1619 PROJECT”

Infographic: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Uprooted Millions | Statista You will find more infographics at Statista

Slavery’s explosive growth, in charts: How ’20 and odd’ became millions is a new interactive from USA Today.

The missing pieces of America’s education is from The Washington Post.

GET A FREE PDF OF THE NY TIMES’ “1619 PROJECT”

Evaluating and Reshaping Timelines in The 1619 Project: New York Times for Kids Edition is from The Pulitzer Center.

How history textbooks reflect America’s refusal to reckon with slavery is from Vox.

The Dawn of American Slavery is from The Washington Post.

‘It Was Very Humiliating’: Readers Share How They Were Taught About Slavery is from The NY Times.

“1619 Project” Poised to Reframe Teaching of Slavery. Here’s How Educators Are Using the Information, Curriculum is from The School Library Journal.

1526 Project: A Look Back at Florida’s Black History in Photos is from a local Miami paper which looked at the 1619 Project for inspiration. It has got me wondering if something like this could be done by classes around the country – looking at the earliest stages of enslavement in local communities and producing public projects about it and its legacy?