Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

March 11, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Carol Dweck Makes Strongest Statement Yet On Growth Mindset Misuse

Professor Carol Dweck has been speaking and writing about what she considers as misuse of the growth mindset concept (you can see links to those articles hear the bottom of The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

Earlier this week, in an article (Growth mindset doesn’t promise pupils the world) at TES, British education website, she made what seems to me to be her most strongly-worded caution to-date:

We-are-not-doing

Unfortunately, though, she did it in the context of challenging the work of Anders Ericsson, who has done the groundbreaking research on the concept of deliberate practice (see The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice).

Listen, I don’t think you’ll find many others who admire and apply Professor Dweck’s work more than me (even though I have critiqued it on occasion – see Our Students Are Not Supermen & Superwomen and The Limits To The Power Of A Growth Mindset (& The Dangers When We Don’t Recognize Them).

However, even though I welcome her recent comments, by challenging Ericsson, I think she might be making the same mistake that she’s criticizing people for making with her own work through misinterpretation.  In the TES article, she claims that Ericsson (along with Benjamin Bloom — though I obviously know about his taxonomy, I don’t think I’m familiar with his work that she’s criticizing) “believe that almost anyone could do almost anything.

As I wrote in a previous post, titled Deliberate Practice & Red Herrings, I wrote:

It seems to me that deliberate practice debunkers often raise a red herring saying that advocates say that anybody can become an expert through deliberate practice.

I haven’t heard that…

What I have read and learned in research on the topic is that deliberate practice is the most important element in developing expertise that is within a person’s control.

What do you think?  Am I the one misinterpreting Ericsson?

December 17, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

Must-Watch Video Of The Day: New RSA Animation Of Carol Dweck Talk

I, and many others, always look forward to the infrequent release of an RSA Animated talk. They are visualizations of talks given by authors/writers/scientists on important topics.

You can see all of them at their YouTube Channel.

Their video of Dan Pink might be the one most familiar to educators.

They just released on of a talk by Carol Dweck, and it’s pretty impressive.

It’s embedded below, and I’m also adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A Growth Mindset.

Coincidentally, What is a Growth Mindset? is the “question-of-the-week” at my Education Week Teacher column, too.

Thanks to Mindset Scholars for the tip.

September 29, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: “Effort Is Not The Only Thing” – Carol Dweck On A Growth Mindset

I’ve been a big-time fan of Carol Dweck’s work (see The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset“).

I’ve also been critical at times about what sometimes seems to a bit myopic view of the challenges facing many of our students (see Our Students Are Not Supermen & Superwomen and The Limits To The Power Of A Growth Mindset (& The Dangers When We Don’t Recognize Them)).

So I was pleased to see Professor Dweck’s recent column in Education Week, Carol Dweck Revisits the ‘Growth Mindset.’

Here’s an excerpt:

Certainly-effort-is-key

I’d also add that there are also ways to help students become aware of systemic causes of some of the challenges they face in a way that does not cause a sense of defeat or further depression, and I wrote about them in Building A Community of Self-Motivated Learners.

June 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Carol Dweck On “Nagging”

Yesterday, I shared a number of reports about Carol Dweck’s talk over the weekend about the growth mindset concept.

Jill Berry shared an article about it in Schools Week headlined Carol Dweck says mindset is not ‘a tool to make children feel good.’

Here’s an excerpt:

Even-some-teachers-who

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

January 18, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Quote Of The Day: I Think This Is The Best Article Carol Dweck Has Written

The Secret to Raising Smart Kids is an article by Carol Dweck in this month’s Scientific American, and I think it’s the best shorter piece sharing her work and perspective that I’ve seen.

I can’t think of anything better to share with a colleague who may be unfamiliar with her work.

Here’s a short excerpt, though it won’t be new to anyone who knows her writings:

I-developed-a-broader

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students and to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

December 17, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Video: New TEDx Talk By Carol Dweck

Professor and researcher Carol Dweck recently gave a TEDx Talk shared by TED titled “The power of believing that you can improve.

I’ve embedded it below, but you can also see it on the TED site at the previous link. That site also has a written transcript of her comments.

Here’s an excerpt:

Scientists-measured-the

I was also struck by this passage:

“…we can actually change students’ mindsets. In one study, we taught them that every time they push out of their comfort zone to learn something new and difficult, the neurons in their brain can form new, stronger connections, and over time they can get smarter. Look what happened: in this study, students who were not taught this growth mindset continued to show declining grades over this difficult school transition, but those who were taught this lesson showed a sharp rebound in their grades.”

That’s certainly been our experience after teacher Dweck-inspired lessons you can find at The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning.

I’ll be adding this post to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

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