Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

More Great Commencement Speeches

'Commencement' photo (c) 2008, Kantlers - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Here are some new additions to The Best Commencement Speeches:

Charlie Day’s Commencement Speech Is the Only One You Need to Hear is from Slate.

What We Learned From The Best Commencement Speeches Ever is from NPR and includes a data base of 300 of them.

The Greatest Commencement Speech Ever is from The Washington Post.

May 15, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Commencement Speeches

'Occidental Commencement 2010' photo (c) 2010, Jason Bache - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I’ve published a number of posts about notable commencement addresses, and thought I’d bring them altogether here.

I was prompted to do so by Vox’s great post today sharing their picks for The 21 greatest graduation speeches of the last 50 years.

Here are my posts (let me know what Vox and I are missing):

Animated Video: George Saunders’ Commencement Speech On “The Importance of Kindness”

Video: “George Saunders Commencement Speech 2013″

Video: Bill Clinton’s Commencement Speech Is Quite Good

Excellent Commencement Address On Failure By Atul Gawande

Quote Of The Day: “It’s Harder To Be Kind Than Clever”

Quote Of The Day: “The Satisfaction Of Teaching…”

Michelle Obama On “Grit”

President Obama On Perseverance

“Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity”

“You’re Never Going To Keep Me Down”

How I’ll Use Part Of The President’s Kalamazoo Speech

And here’s a piece from The Washington Post: The funniest commencement speeches.

Charlie Day’s Commencement Speech Is the Only One You Need to Hear is from Slate.

What We Learned From The Best Commencement Speeches Ever is from NPR and includes a data base of 300 of them.

The Greatest Commencement Speech Ever is from The Washington Post.

Commencement Mashup: The Speech In Eight Easy Steps
is from NPR.

Anatomy Of A Great Commencement Speech is from NPR.

Commencement 2014 | Things to Read, Watch, Debate, Teach and Learn is from The New York Times Learning Network.

John Lewis: “You Must Find A Way To Get In Trouble”

May 20, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: Bill Clinton’s Commencement Speech Is Quite Good

I learned about Bill Clinton’s speech at Howard University from The Atlantic’s post, The Best Commencement Speeches of 2013, and it’s quite good.

I couldn’t find a written transcript, but here’s a good excerpt The Atlantic published:

But the most important thing is that we are all 99 and a half percent the same … The half a percent matters. It gave Einstein the biggest brain ever measured. He made pretty good use of it. It’s a good thing. That half a percent means LeBron James is hard to stop if he is driving for a basket. The half a percent matters. But so does the 99 and a half percent … And when you leave here I want you to never to forget for the rest of your life in the good times and bad that we live in an interdependent world and we’ve got to pull it together which means to be a good citizen you’ve got to something sometime for someone else because they are just like you are.

You can see what other commencement speeches over the year I’ve found worth watching here.

June 4, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Excellent Commencement Address On Failure By Atul Gawande

I’m a big fan of Atul Gawande’s writing, and have previously written about his work on instructional coaching.

Yesterday, he gave an impressive commencement address on “Failure and Rescue” at Williams College.

You can read it here (and I’d strongly encourage you to do so), but here’s my quick summary and his ending:

He points out that perhaps we don’t need to encourage people to take risks and make mistakes — we all are going to have our fair share of failures no matter what. The key, though, is in planning for that possibility and what we do with it:

So you will take risks, and you will have failures. But it’s what happens afterward that is defining. A failure often does not have to be a failure at all. However, you have to be ready for it—will you admit when things go wrong? Will you take steps to set them right?—because the difference between triumph and defeat, you’ll find, isn’t about willingness to take risks. It’s about mastery of rescue.

I’m adding this to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

June 14, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

John Lewis: “You Must Find A Way To Get In Trouble”

Congressman and Civil Rights leader John Lewis gave the commencement address at Emory University last month.

Here’s an excerpt, followed by a video of the entire speech.

I’m also going to use the excerpt with a writing prompt next year in my U.S. History class. The prompt will be:

What does John Lewis mean when he says it’s important to get into trouble? To what extent do you agree (or disagree) with what he is saying? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings.

I’m adding this post both to The Best Commencement Speeches and to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction (which is way I collect my writing prompts).

I-saw-those-signs-that

June 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

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Another day, another mid-year “Best” list (you can find all 1,300 Best lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators and The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far:

Over at Vox, Ezra Klein interviews Ta-Nehisi Coates about his article, “The Case for Reparations.” I’ve embedded the video below, but Vox has a nice interactive table of contents that might make it more useful — especially if you don’t have an hour to watch the whole thing. I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism.

Who’s not familiar with the famous Schoolhouse Rock video, I’m Just A Bill? Just in case, though, it’s the second video after this description. The first video is an updated version by Vox that is more cynical and more accurate (I’m not sure of that one will show-up in an RSS Reader).

I added this video to The Best Hans Rosling Videos:

I added this video to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research:

I’ve previously posted the video and links to the full text of George Saunders’ well known commencement speech on “The Importance of Kindness.”

Now, this animation of part of it has been created….

I added this next video from Business Insider to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures:

I added this amazing video to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About World History:

Watch as 1000 years of European borders change (timelapse map) from Nick Mironenko on Vimeo.

I added this video to The Best “Language Maps”:

TED Talks unveiled a new animation titled “The Long Reach Of Reason.”

Here’s how Chris Anderson at TED describes it:

Two years ago the psychologist Steven Pinker and the philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, who are married, came to TED to take part in a form of Socratic dialog. Steven Pinker and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein: The long reach of reasonSteven Pinker and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein: The long reach of reasonShe sought to argue that Reason was a much more powerful force in history than it’s normally given credit for. He initially defended the modern consensus among psychologists and neurologists, that most human behavior is best explained through other means: unconscious instincts of various kinds. But over the course of the dialog, he is persuaded by her, and together they look back through history and see how reasoned arguments ended up having massive impacts, even if those impacts sometimes took centuries to unfold.

They turned it into a “talk in animated dialogue form.” I’ve embedded it below, and you can read more about it here.

This next video is only a little over two minutes. Watch it til the very end…

Neil deGrasse Tyson shared this great video showing effective teaching in action. I’ve added it to The Best Places To Learn About (And View Video Clips Of) Teachers In The Movies:

Here are two good videos. Make a point of reading Joe Bower’s analyses of the South African reading commercial (the first video) and of the video of the young girl learning to ski. You won’t be disappointed.

John McCarthy shared this short video clip of U.S. Olympic bobsledder Lolo Jones. She begins by sharing her favorite quote (though doesn’t cite the source and I can’t find it online, either):

“A failure isn’t a failure if it prepares you for success tomorrow”

I showed the video to my students, along with writing that quotation on the board. Then, I asked them to respond to this writing prompt:

What is Lolo Jones saying about how we should view failure? What do you think of her view? To develop your position, be sure to include specific examples. These examples can come from the video, anything else you’ve read, and/or your own observations and experiences.

I added this to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures and to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction (where I collect all my writing prompts).

I’m Not Sure You’ll Find A Better Video Illustrating The Importance Of Libraries Than “El Bibliotecario”:

The Librarian / El Bibliotecario from Facebook Stories on Vimeo.

This is a very creative video from TED-Ed. You can see the whole lesson here.

Ann Foreman shared this Life of Brian video on Facebook. It’s a classic scene of how NOT to teach grammar:

TED Ed shared a nice lesson and video called “Who Invited Writing?” You can see the entire lesson here:

Do we teach like cats or dogs? This video was shared by Daniel Coyle on Twitter:

I’ve added this video to The Best Online Resources For Teaching & Learning About World War II (Part Two):

I don’t think I’d use this with students, but, as Greg Toppo said when he shared this on Twitter, it seems like a “spot-on take on bullying.”

Because of that, I’m adding it to A Very, Very Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Bullying.

May 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

May’s “The Best” Lists — There Are Now Exactly 1,300 Of Them!

December 1, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best “Quotes Of The Day” In 2013 – Part Two

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A few months ago, I begin periodically posting “quotes of the day.”

In addition, I regularly highlight quotes from guests writing at my Education Week Teacher column.

Here are my favorites since I published The Best “Quotes Of The Day” In 2013 – So Far six months ago:

The Myth of Teachers Not Changing is a post by Larry Cuban.

Here’s an excerpt:

Policymakers-dressed-up

Close Reading and Far-Reaching Classroom Discussion: Fostering a Vital Connection is a paper written by Catherine Snow and Catherine O’Connor for the International Reading Association.

It offers some important warnings for all educators. Here’s an excerpt:

We-celebrate-the-move-to

Do student test scores provide solid basis to evaluate teachers? is an article from Stanford’s Graduate School of Education that reports on new research by Edward Haertel, emeritus professor of education. The professor recently published a report on the use of Value Added Measures.

Here’s an excerpt:

FromDostudenttestscoresprovidesolidbasistoevaluateteachersStanfordGraduateSchoolofEducation

Why Do Teachers Quit? is an interesting article in The Atlantic.

Here’s an excerpt:

Anywhere-between-40-and

Nelba Marquez-Greene, whose child was killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School last year, had a guest column published in Education Week — A Sandy Hook Parent’s Letter to Teachers.

Here’s an excerpt:

Your-courage-will

The Associated Press published Facts, figures as students return to the classroom.

Here’s an excerpt:

The-average-teacher-in-a

The New York Times published a number of responses to an article on teacher “churn” in charter schools (see An Eye-Opening Article On Charter School Teacher Turnover).

Carol Burris’ response is phenomenal.

Here’s an excerpt:

When-teachers-stay-in-a

NPR interviews several educators, including Rafe Esquith, at More Than A Number? Educators On What Standardized Testing Means.

Here’s an excerpt from the NPR interview:

I-went-to-a-Common-Core

I’m a big believer in the use of storytelling in teaching (see The Power Of Stories for more details on how I do it).

Once Upon A Time At The Office: 10 Storytelling Tips To Help You Be More Persuasive
is a good article from Fast Company on the same topic.

Here’s an excerpt:

Studies-carried-out-by

The article also mentioned this nice quote from Ira Glass:

Great-stories-happen-to

Peter Bregman wrote a good, short post for the Harvard Business Review titled “A Question That Can Change Your Life.”

Here’s an excerpt:

Heres-the-question-Id

In light of the big Washington Post news earlier this year , Dan Pink tweeted out a link to Jeff Bezos commencement address at Princeton. Here’s an excerpt:

My-grandfather-looked-at

When Can You Trust a Data Scientist? is a very thoughtful article that I’d recommend to all teachers and, particularly, to anyone doing research in the education field.

It includes several criteria to consider when deciding if one should trust a “data scientist” or anyone who does research. Here are two:

Two-things-to-look-for

Practical Tips for Overcoming Resistance is a post from The Harvard Business Review.

Here’s an excerpt that shares the best classroom management advice anyone can give — and listen to:

When-you-are-faced-with

‘There Is No Such Thing As An Unmotivated Student’ is the title of one of my posts over at Education Week Teacher. The “line-up” of contributors is impressive, with guest responses from Cris Tovani, Josh Stumpenhorst and Eric Jensen.

Here’s an excerpt:

Motivation-doesnt-come

Response: Helping Students Develop a Desire To Read At Home is another post over at Education Week Teacher. It includes responses from Donalyn Miller and Myron Dueck, and I throw in my own ideas.

Here’s an excerpt:

Students-who-are-engaged

Response: The Best Advice On Doing Project-Based Learning is yet another post over at Education Week Teacher. Suzie Boss provides the primary guest response, along with many suggestions from readers.

Here’s an excerpt:

By-connecting-classroom

You might be interested in exploring the other 1,200 “The Best…” lists…..

December 1, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

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Here’s the latest in annual The Best…” posts….

This post includes my choices for videos since I posted The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far six months ago.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators and The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two:

Perseverance (grit) is one of the key qualities researchers have found to be essential in a successful language learner, as well as other learners.

Here’s a video demonstrating that quality that I’m adding to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

As I constantly tell my students, the ability to identify patterns is a key to higher-order thinking and to language-learning.

This would be a great video to play — at first, without sound — and have students try to identify the pattern in the images they see…

This is from Yahoo News and is a great illustration of “thinking outside the box”:

Here’s another “thinking outside the box video:

I’ve written in my New York Times column about how I use optical illusions with English Language Learners, and I certainly use them when teaching perception in my Theory of Knowledge class. You can many that I’ve previously posted here.

Here’s a new neat one created by Honda and puts many different illusions into one short video:

Here’s the newest Hans Rosling video:

I’ve written extensively in my books and in this blog about the lessons I use with students to help them want to develop more self-control.

And I’ve also shared new videos from Sesame Street highlighting their emphasis on teaching self-control, grit, and respect this season.

My high school students love the Sesame Street videos, which I use as a short “refresher” during the year after we do our initial lesson on self-control.

This one on “The Waiting Game,” though, is the best one yet. In it, Cookie Monster demonstrates each of the strategies that Dr. Walter Mischel recommends that people use (and that he saw children apply in the marshmallow test) to enhance their self-control.

I’ll be showing the video to students and having them identify each of those strategies:

I’m adding this great video from The Center For Teaching Quality to The Best Resources On Being A Teacherpreneur:

I Wonder How Many Of Our Students Hear This When We Go Over Classroom Rules?:

I’ve previously shared a thirteen minute version of Bloom’s Taxonomy According to Andy Griffith, which you can find at The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

The video’s creator has now edited its length down considerably. Here’s the new version:

Last year, John T. Spencer began a great Twitter hashtag called #saidnoteacherever.

I brought together a collection of them at A Sampling Of The Best Tweets With The #SaidNoTeacherEver Hashtag.

Now, some teachers have done a short video person — unfortunately, without giving credit to John and the original source. But it is pretty funny. And if you go to watch it on YouTube, people have made some pretty nice additions in the comments.

This next video is the best one I’ve Seen On Perseverance & Resilience.

This video is part of a new TED-Ed Lesson titled There’s no dishonor in having a disability. You can see the entire lesson here.

All I can say is…Wow.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit.”

Tom Whitford was kind enough to share this fun video on Twitter. It’s the first in a series (you can see the rest by going directly to YouTube).

Everybody will enjoy it, but especially ESL teachers:

I’m adding this next video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

I’ve previously posted about George Saunders’ recent commencement speech. Here’s a video of his address:

I’m adding this video to A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics:

You can read more about NASA’s latest video on climate change showing what happens to the United States.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

This is a short video on scaffolding from Beyond The Bubble, a history site about which I’ve previously posted.

Thought it talks about history, its scaffolding recommendations can be helpful in any subject.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

“I shall either find a way or make one” has been attributed to Hannibal, though he probably didn’t say it.

This goat seems to exemplify that expression — no matter who said it.

I’m adding it to The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting.

Edublogs has created this video on “What Is A Blog?”

I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Teachers (And Others!) On How To Be Better Bloggers and to My Best Posts For Tech Novices (Plus A Few From Other People).

You might also be interested in the other 1,200 “The Best…” lists I’ve posted.

November 1, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

554951644490537_a-feefae6d_r7-aUg_pm

Here’s the latest in annual The Best…” posts….

This post includes my choices for videos since I posted The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far six months ago.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators and The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two:

Perseverance (grit) is one of the key qualities researchers have found to be essential in a successful language learner, as well as other learners.

Here’s a video demonstrating that quality that I’m adding to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

As I constantly tell my students, the ability to identify patterns is a key to higher-order thinking and to language-learning.

This would be a great video to play — at first, without sound — and have students try to identify the pattern in the images they see…

This is from Yahoo News and is a great illustration of “thinking outside the box”:

Here’s another “thinking outside the box video:

I’ve written in my New York Times column about how I use optical illusions with English Language Learners, and I certainly use them when teaching perception in my Theory of Knowledge class. You can many that I’ve previously posted here.

Here’s a new neat one created by Honda and puts many different illusions into one short video:

Here’s the newest Hans Rosling video:

I’ve written extensively in my books and in this blog about the lessons I use with students to help them want to develop more self-control.

And I’ve also shared new videos from Sesame Street highlighting their emphasis on teaching self-control, grit, and respect this season.

My high school students love the Sesame Street videos, which I use as a short “refresher” during the year after we do our initial lesson on self-control.

This one on “The Waiting Game,” though, is the best one yet. In it, Cookie Monster demonstrates each of the strategies that Dr. Walter Mischel recommends that people use (and that he saw children apply in the marshmallow test) to enhance their self-control.

I’ll be showing the video to students and having them identify each of those strategies:

I’m adding this great video from The Center For Teaching Quality to The Best Resources On Being A Teacherpreneur:

I Wonder How Many Of Our Students Hear This When We Go Over Classroom Rules?:

I’ve previously shared a thirteen minute version of Bloom’s Taxonomy According to Andy Griffith, which you can find at The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

The video’s creator has now edited its length down considerably. Here’s the new version:

Last year, John T. Spencer began a great Twitter hashtag called #saidnoteacherever.

I brought together a collection of them at A Sampling Of The Best Tweets With The #SaidNoTeacherEver Hashtag.

Now, some teachers have done a short video person — unfortunately, without giving credit to John and the original source. But it is pretty funny. And if you go to watch it on YouTube, people have made some pretty nice additions in the comments.

This next video is the best one I’ve Seen On Perseverance & Resilience.

This video is part of a new TED-Ed Lesson titled There’s no dishonor in having a disability. You can see the entire lesson here.

All I can say is…Wow.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit.”

Tom Whitford was kind enough to share this fun video on Twitter. It’s the first in a series (you can see the rest by going directly to YouTube).

Everybody will enjoy it, but especially ESL teachers:

I’m adding this next video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

I’ve previously posted about George Saunders’ recent commencement speech. Here’s a video of his address:

I’m adding this video to A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics:

You can read more about NASA’s latest video on climate change showing what happens to the United States.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

This is a short video on scaffolding from Beyond The Bubble, a history site about which I’ve previously posted.

Thought it talks about history, its scaffolding recommendations can be helpful in any subject.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

“I shall either find a way or make one” has been attributed to Hannibal, though he probably didn’t say it.

This goat seems to exemplify that expression — no matter who said it.

I’m adding it to The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting.

Edublogs has created this video on “What Is A Blog?”

I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Teachers (And Others!) On How To Be Better Bloggers and to My Best Posts For Tech Novices (Plus A Few From Other People).

This is a wonderful video, and great, engaging English practice!

Here’s a very good video I’m adding to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction:

I’ve written in my books and here on my blog how I use the concept of “gratitude” in class (see The Best Resources On “Gratitude”).

My colleague Katie Hull did a simple and powerful lesson using one of the resources on that “Best” list and I thought I’d share it here.

It’s based on an experiment and video that “Soul Pancake’ did (the video is on that list, but I’ve also embedded again in this post).

Katie gave her students this writing prompt (which is very similar to the question used in the video):

Close your eyes and think of somebody who is really influential in your life and/or who matters to you. Why is this person so important?

She also shared what she had written about her father as a model. After students wrote it, and shared in partners, she showed the video. Then, she encouraged people to to share what they wrote with the person they wrote about — in fact, some students felt they wanted to share it right then by calling.

Tears were shed.

You might also be interested in the other 1,200 “The Best…” lists I’ve posted.

August 4, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Quote Of The Day: “Be Kinder”

Writer George Saunders recently gave a commencement address that has been making the rounds.

Its theme reminds me of a previous quote of the day (The Importance Of Being Nice) and offers good advice to all of us, including teachers.

Here’s an excerpt:

Who-in-your-life-do-you

I’ve written about a number of other memorable commencement speeches over the years…

June 17, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far

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Here’s the latest in my mid-year“The Best…” posts….

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far:

Jason Flom shared this great video on the importance of making mistakes. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

This demonstrates both the disadvantages of extrinsic motivation and the importance of helping our students develop creativity. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students and to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity:

Here’s a cute video that would be a fun introduction to the lesson on self-control in my book, Helping Students Motivate Themselves (and it could be used with any of the other ideas I share in The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control).

A willingness to take risks is an important quality of a language learner, which is why I’m adding this video to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

Story, Imagery, & the Art of 21st Century Presentation is a very good video of Garr Reynolds on presentation skills. I’m adding it to The Best Digital (& Non-Digital) Storytelling Resources.

Here’s a great video animation created by Scott McLeod where he imagines a conversation between a policy maker and an educator about “teacher accountability.”

I’m adding it to A Collection Of The Best “Laugh While You Cry” Videos.

Dan Pink has posted a nice and short video demonstrating the importance of asking good questions.

I’m adding it to….The Best Videos Showing The Importance Of Asking Good Questions.

You may have heard about the late David Foster Wallace’s amazing commencement address from several years ago at Kenyon College. A video, using his audio, was unveiled on the Web, and has since been seen millions of times. Here’s the video (you can read the transcript here). Here are previous posts where I’ve also highlighted particularly notable commencement addresses:

This TED Talk video from Rita Pierson on “Every Kid Needs A Champion” is a great one. I had never heard of Rita Pierson before, but she makes great points. I wonder how and why she got connected to Ruby Payne? (see The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne).

I’m adding the video to The Best Resources On The Importance Of Building Positive Relationships With Students.

This is a great entertaining video, and it got me wondering if it could be a model for some class projects — would it make sense for students to create similar videos demonstrating the historical transitions in, let’s say, the rule of law, or how children were treated (or, as one reader suggested, changing scientific beliefs)? You’d want to be very, very careful (and I’d probably avoid it) with using it to examine racial and gender attitudes, but there may very well be other attitudes that would be worth examining. At the very least, the video will offer a few minutes of enjoyable entertainment:

What a great video to help teach “Perception” to IB Theory Of Knowledge students:

Here’s another short video that would be great to teach “perception” in IB Theory of Knowledge classes. Thanks to Michelle Henry for the tip:

The PBS News Hour aired an impressive report on project-based learning in a Kentucky school district. I’m embedding the video below, but it might not come through on an RSS Reader:

Watch School District Uses Project Based Learning Over Testing on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

The report refers to an interesting program in that state called “districts of innovation. You can read more about them here and here.

I’m adding this info to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas and to The Best Articles Describing Alternatives To High-Stakes Testing.

The Anti-Defamation League has launched an “Imagine a World Without Hate” video and action campaign with the posting of this pretty amazing video. It can be used in many ways, including as part of a “what if?” history lesson. That’s why I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons:

Rick Wormeli shared these two very useful videos of education researcher John Hattie:

I’m adding this excellent video on how African men are stereotyped in Hollywood movies to The Best Geography Sites For Learning About Africa. It’ll be a great way to also get my ESL students to start talking about how they feel their cultures have also been stereotyped.

The wonderful StoryCorps stories on NPR are great pieces to read and listen to on the radio. They also have converted a number of them into short video animations, and many of them (though not the one I’ve embedded below) are closed-captioned.

Here is one of my favorites — with the late, great Studs Terkel:

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality:

The well-regarded documentary The Finland Phenomenon is now online for free and is embedded below. I learned about its availability via a tweet by Pasi Sahlberg, which also included a radio interview. I’m adding it to The Best Resources To Learn About Finland’s Education System.

The Gates Foundation  released a new one of Hans Rosling’s “magic” world data videos (you can see his previous ones I’ve posted here). Check it out:

The eagle in this video certainly illustrates an example of perseverance. I’m adding it to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

NASA released this video showing temperature changes in the world since 1880 and including 2012 — it’s an updated version of one they’ve released in previous years. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

What A Great Video To Show The Importance Of Modeling & Support:

Dan Pink was interviewed on CBS, and it really gets at some key elements of motivation and goal-setting. There’s nothing new there for people familiar with his work, but it’s a great piece to show to colleagues and to students. I’ve embedded it below, though am not sure if it will show-up in an RSS Reader:

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students and to The Best Posts On Students Setting Goals.

Eduardo Briceño is the Co-Founder, with Dr. Carol Dweck, of Mindset Works:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

I wouldn’t put this next video in the same class as the other ones on this list, but I think readers might still find it useful. Eye On Education, the publisher of my new books on student motivation, Helping Students Motivate Themselves and Self-Driven Learning, have just posted a short video clip from a webinar I did for them.

In it, I share three strategies that can help students develop intrinsic motivation:

Feedback is welcome.

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May 22, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Michelle Obama On “Grit”

This past weekend, Michelle Obama spoke at graduation of Martin Luther King Jr. Magnet High School in Nashville.

You can read the transcript of her entire speech here and watch it here.

However, I want to focus on the few minutes she spoke about “grit.” First, I’ve printed text excerpt, and then I’ve embedded a video of just that portion of her speech (I don’t think the video will go through on an RSS Reader).

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

What I learned was that when something doesn’t go your way, you’ve just got to adjust. You’ve got to dig deep and work like crazy. And that’s when you’ll find out what you’re really made of, during those hard times.

But you can only do that if you’re willing to put yourself in a position where you might fail. And that’s why so often, failure is the key to success for so many great people. Take Steve Jobs, who was fired from Apple early in his career, and now his iPods and iPads and iPhones have revolutionized the entire world. Oprah was demoted from her first job as a news anchor, now she doesn’t even need a last name. (Laughter.) And then there’s this guy, Barack Obama, who lost — (applause) — I could take up a whole afternoon talking about his failures, but — (laughter) — he lost his first race for Congress, and now he gets to call himself my husband. (Laughter and applause.)

All jokes aside, the point is, is that resilience and grit, that ability to pick yourself up when you fall. Those are some of the most important skills you’ll need as you make your way through college and through life.

And here’s the thing, graduates: These qualities are not ones that you’re born with. They’re not like the color of your eyes or your height. They’re not qualities that are beyond your control. Instead, you can dictate whether you’ll have grit. You decide how hard you’ll work. So I want you to make those choices right now, today, if you haven’t already done so. Make those choices. I want you to tell yourself that no matter what challenges you face, that you will commit yourself to achieving your goals, no matter where life takes you.

May 19, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: “This Is Water”

You may have heard about the late David Foster Wallace’s amazing commencement address from several years ago at Kenyon College. A few days ago, a video, using his audio, was unveiled on the Web, and has since been seen millions of times. Here’s the video (you can read the transcript here).

Here are previous posts where I’ve also highlighted particularly notable commencement addresses.

May 5, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

President Obama On Perseverance

President Obama gave the commencement address at Ohio State University this weekend. Here’s what he said about perseverance. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About learning The Importance Of Grit:

Which brings me to the second thing I ask of all of you — I ask that you persevere. Whether you start a business, or run for office, or devote yourself to alleviating poverty or hunger, please remember that nothing worth doing happens overnight. A British inventor named Dyson went through more than 5,000 prototypes before getting that first really fancy vacuum cleaner just right. We remember Michael Jordan’s six championships; we don’t remember his nearly 15,000 missed shots. As for me, I lost my first race for Congress, and look at me now — I’m an honorary graduate of The Ohio State University. (Applause.)

The point is, if you are living your life to the fullest, you will fail, you will stumble, you will screw up, you will fall down. But it will make you stronger, and you’ll get it right the next time, or the time after that, or the time after that. And that is not only true for your personal pursuits, but it’s also true for the broader causes that you believe in as well.

So you can’t give up your passion if things don’t work right away. You can’t lose heart, or grow cynical if there are twists and turns on your journey. The cynics may be the loudest voices — but I promise you, they will accomplish the least. It’s those folks who stay at it, those who do the long, hard, committed work of change that gradually push this country in the right direction, and make the most lasting difference.