Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

February 5, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: Watch The Extended Interview Jon Stewart Did With Michelle Rhee

Michelle Rhee was on The Daily Show last night. I thought she generally came across as quite reasonable and tried to minimize and gloss over many of her beliefs. Stewart kept pressing her — admirably, I thought, while trying to maintain his nice guy persona — and the best part is clearly Part Three (the second and third parts appeared on the Web). That’s when Rhee told Stewart “You’re looking confused” when it was clear that Stewart had enough of her ducking and weaving, and he began to question her more forcefully.

I was struck by several things Stewart said during the interview, including:

teaching is an art form

teachers subjected to new offensive coordinator coming in every few years

There hasn’t really been any innovation in education since John Dewey. (this is the only time I thought he was off-base)

Teachers seem like one tool to get education on track, but they seem to be the only tool that ever gets yelled at…. There’s poverty, communities, but teachers are the only ones we tell, “Fix it, or you’re fired!”

Education can take place if the soil is fertile..

Is school the biggest factor?

It seems we’ve abandoned the model of public school in the inner city

You are creating a system where the public school becomes a place for the toughest cases [and others go to charters]

The systemic issues that are the underlying causes of the poor performances never get addressed.

The entire system of standardized tests is somewhat broken.

You might also want to view Stewart’s interview with Diane Ravitch, which was extraordinary, as well as other ones I’ve previously highlighted.

What did you think of the interview?

July 28, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: Jon Stewart Interviews Joseph Stiglitz

Jon Stewart did a very good interview with Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz about wealth inequality in the United States. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality:

March 4, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
4 Comments

Jon Stewart & Diane Ravitch Knock It Out Of The Park!

Last night’s “The Daily Show” was a classic. Jon Stewart opened with what was probably the most insightful, funny, and effective response I have seen to on-going teacher-bashing. Ten minutes late, Diane Ravitch came on and did a fabulous interview. For some reason, I wasn’t able to get the embed code for the entire episode. However, I was able to embed the three key sections: The first two videos are the two segments of the amazing opening piece on schools, and then the third is the interview with Diane Ravitch:

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Crisis in the Dairyland – For Richer and Poorer
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor & Satire Blog The Daily Show on Facebook

March 1, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Here’s Jon Stewart’s Great Piece On Teachers From Last Night

Jon Stewart did a brilliant piece on teachers last night (You’ll certainly want to tune on Thursday night (I had originally written Wednesday by mistake) when he interviews Diane Ravitch). Here’s a portion of it:

September 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“How We Got To Now” Looks Like A Terrific PBS Series

9781594632969_p0_v4_s260x420

Steven Johnson is hosting a new six-part PBS series called How We Got To Now that will start on October 15th (he also wrote a companion book). Here’s how PBS describes it:

Johnson explains how the answers to the questions he poses in each episode — such as “how do we make something cold?” or “how do we create light?”— have driven other discoveries through the web of ideas and innovations that made each finding possible. Tracking each pursuit through history both ancient and contemporary, Johnson unlocks tales of unsung heroes and radical revolutions that changed the world and the way we live in it.

Here’s a trailer for the show, along with an interview Jon Stewart did with Johnson this past week. I’m adding this info to The Best Sites Where Students Can Learn About Inventions.

December 31, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Good Posts & Articles On Education Policy

November 29, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two

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Here’s another annual “Best…” list, this time focusing on education policy.

You can see my picks for the first six months of the year at what functions as Part One of this list: The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 – So Far.

And you might also want to check out my Washington Post piece, Best and worst education news of 2013.

You might also be interested in:

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) On Education Policy In One Place

All My 2012 “The Best…” Lists On Education Policy In One Place

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Polcy In 2011 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two:

Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post published an absolutely terrific interview with famed teacher an author Rafe Esquith.

It’s a must-read. In fact, it should go on so many of my “The Best…” lists I’m not sure where to start….

Here’s an excerpt:

Mike-Feinberg-cofounder

Diane Ravitch was on The Daily Show. Here’s her two-part interview, which includes an “extended” portion that only appeared on the Web. You might also be interested in the previous time she was on the show — see Jon Stewart & Diane Ravitch Knock It Out Of The Park!

The Best Posts Interpreting This Year’s NAEP Scores

The Best Posts About The New York Testing Fiasco The Best Resources On Being A Teacherpreneur

The Best Posts & Articles About The Role Of Economists In Education

The Best Posts & Articles On The Tony Bennett Scandal

The Best Posts & Articles On The NCLB Waiver Given To Eight California School Districts (Including Ours)

The Best Resources On Why Improving Education Is Not THE Answer To Poverty & Inequality

The Best Resources For Learning About Scotland’s Schools

The Best Posts & Articles About Why High School Exit Exams Might Not Be A Good Idea

The Best Examples Of School Reformer Irony

A Beginning List Of The Best Posts & Articles On The Charter School CREDO Study

Paying Economists by Hair Color? Thoughts on Masters Degrees & Teacher Compensation by Bruce Baker is one of the best pieces on education policy I’ve read in awhile.

Larry Cuban published an important post titled The Sham and Shame Of Best Practices.

He discusses how the concept of “best practices” is adapted from the medical world, where it has also been criticized.

Here’s a key paragraph where he describes an analysis done of the concept in health care:

According to Groopman, experts who recommended “best practice” treatments (and their advice became Medicare mandates to all physicians) “did not distinguish between medical practices that can be standardized and not significantly altered by the condition of the individual patient, and those that must be adapted to a particular person.” He gives the example of putting a catheter into a blood vessel, a procedure that involves the same steps for every patient to avoid infection. This “one-size-fits-all” mechanical procedure differs from prescribing a “best practice” for a complex disease such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, or breast cancer. Not making this critical distinction leads experts to overreach in their recommendations to practitioners and, in time, turn a “best practice” such as hormone replacement therapy for women into a fad. A similar situation plagues school reform.

And here’s Larry Cuban’s verdict:

I-am-not-the-first

Reliability and Validity of Inferences About Teachers Based on Student Test Scores by Edward H. Haertel from Stanford University was published by The Education Testing Service (ETS). It’s an extraordinary critique of the use of Value Added Measures in teacher evaluation. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation.

Forever young: the new teaching career is by Mike Rose. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Raising Concerns About Teach For America.

Here’s a short video shared on Twitter by Arthur Goldstein showing Charlotte Danielson, the present “guru” of teacher evaluation for many districts, saying that student test results should not be used in teacher evaluations:

Teaching Lessons: What KIPP Did—and Didn’t—Learn From America’s “Best” Teacher is an excellent post by Andrea Gabor. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

Five basic lessons on public education (short and long versions) is from The Washington Post and was written by Brian Langley. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Providing An “Overall” Perspective On Education Policy.

I’m certainly adding this new piece from The Onion to The Best Education Articles From “The Onion” :

Progressive Charter School Doesn’t Have Students. Here’s an excerpt:

One year into its founding as the purported “bold next step in education reform,” administrators on Monday sang the praises of Forest Gates Academy, a progressive new charter school that practices an innovative philosophy of not admitting any students. “We’ve done something here at Forest Gates that is truly special, combining modern, cutting-edge pedagogical methods with a refreshingly non-pupil-centric approach,” said academy president Diane Blanchard

I’m obviously biased, but I really like ‘Teacherpreneurs Can Lead Reforms’: An Interview With Barnett Berry , a post I did over at Education Week Teacher, and “There Are No Shortcuts”: An Interview With Rafe Esquith, another one of my Ed Week pieces.

Why we can’t all get along over school reform is a post I wrote for The Washington Post.

You might also be interested in seeing all 1,200 of my “The Best…” lists.

October 31, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: John Stewart’s Two-Part Interview With Diane Ravitch

'Dr. Diane Ravitch speaking to San Diego educators. #hero' photo (c) 2013, DB BLAS - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Diane Ravitch was on The Daily Show last night. Here’s her two-part interview, which includes an “extended” portion that only appeared on the Web. You might also be interested in the previous time she was on the show — see Jon Stewart & Diane Ravitch Knock It Out Of The Park!

June 13, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

And This Year’s Winner of the Bull Connor Award For Promoting Ethnic Minority Voter Participation Is…

One of the most important purposes of public education, I believe, is to prepare students to participate in democratic public life. There are many aspects of this kind of activity, including voting.

It does not appear that Florida’s Governor Scott shares my belief in wanting to promote this kind of democratic engagement, however.

He is having registered voters investigated to see if they are U.S. citizens, and is being sued by the United States Department of Justice (see NPR’s story, Justice Department Sues Florida As Voter Battle Intensifies).

His initiative is clearly a thinly veiled effort to discourage Latino voting, as The Daily Show’s episode from last night demonstrates (if you’re reading this on an RSS Readers you may have to click through to see the embedded video):

This reminds me of an incident in my community organizing career when then-California Secretary of State Bill Jones was unhappy with Congresswoman’s Sanchez election victory and began a similar search of voter rolls. Five hundred of our members, led by thirty African-American, Latino, Asia, and white clergy, marched to his office to present him with what we called The Bull Connor Award For Promoting Ethnic Minority Voter Participation. It was a well-produced placard with this image of Bull Connor’s police in Birmingham, Alabama using police dogs to prevent African Americans from registering to vote (among other “offenses”):

He, however, was not aware of the irony, and thought he was getting a serious award. Five minutes before he was scheduled to meet with us, however, one of his staffpeople figured out what was going on and canceled the ceremony.

One week later Jones also canceled his investigation of voter’s citizenship status.

May 9, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Using A Lesson On Cognitive Dissonance To Help Students Learn To Take Responsibility

I have an extended lesson plan in my book, Helping Students Motivate Themselves, on helping students learn to take personal responsibility and blame others less.

In addition, I have a related “The Best..” list called The Best Resources For Helping Students (& The Rest Of Us) Learn The Concept Of Not Blaming Others.

Today, I got an idea for an addition to those lessons.

First, NPR ran a story titled Partisan Psychology: Why Do People Choose Political Loyalties Over Facts? It discusses a study on cognitive dissonance — holding two conflicting opinions in your head at the same time. Even though the article was talking about it in the context of politics, it certainly happens in the classroom. For example, when a student throws a wad of paper at another student and explains to the teacher that the other student “made him do it” even though the teacher points out that nobody “made him” do it but himself. They have inconsistent ideas in their head.

The NPR article points out a study that found that people tend to have cognitive dissonance because it’s painful for them if they do not. They then found that people were more likely to get past these inconsistencies if they felt more positive about themselves.

So, I’m going to develop an addendum to my lesson on personal responsibility. I’m thinking it might be worth including a short piece on cognitive dissonance where we learn what it is, I share examples from my life, and students share experiences from their own. We can review this study, and I’m hopeful that it might make student more aware of its dangers.

In addition, I’m thinking that this info could be a useful classroom management tool. When, for example, I have a paper wad throwing incident like I share earlier, I wonder what might happen if I asked a student who was reluctant to accept responsibility to take a minute and think about something positive he did in his life?

Coincidentally, Jon Stewart did a piece on cognitive dissonance last night on the Daily Show. There are a couple of inappropriate parts here, but portions of it could be useful in class. Here it is:

I’m certainly open to other ideas on how to make this point better, too!

February 19, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Fifth Anniversary Of This Blog — What Have Been My Most Popular Posts?

I began this blog five years ago.

Writing it has made me a better teacher for my students, and I hope it’s been helpful to others. It’s been an incredible gift to be able to connect with so many talented educators around the world.

Feedburner, though sometimes erratic, consistently says about 25,000 people subscribe to this blog daily. There’s bound to be overlap, but there are also 2,000 people who receive my monthly newsletter, and fifteen thousand who read it via Twitter, along with others who read it on Facebook and on Google+.

Since I began writing this blog, I’ve published over 9,000 posts (including over 850 “The Best…” lists), not to mention seventy articles and three books (with two more upcoming). I have also begun writing two other blogs — my teacher advice column at Education Week Teacher and the Engaging Parents In School blog.

I appreciate the people I have met — online or in person — through this blog, and everything I have learned from you.

Thanks, and forward to another year!

In addition to the above few words, I thought people might find it interesting to see what have been the most popular posts since this blog began.

Here are they are:

1. The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom

2. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2007

3. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2009

4. The Best Places To Get Royalty-Free Music & Sound Effects

5. The Best Teacher Resources For “Foldables”

6. The Best Websites To Help Beginning Readers

7. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2008

8. The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

9. The Best Sites To Learn About Valentine’s Day

10. The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL

11. The Best Sites For Online Photo-Editing & Photo Effects

12. The Best Online Sources For Images

13. The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English

14. The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

15. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2011 — So Far

16. The Best Websites For Learning About Halloween

17. The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2007

18. The Best Places To Learn About Christmas, Hanukkah, & Kwanzaa

19. The Best Music Websites For Learning English

20. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2010

Though “The Best…” lists are clearly extremely popular, some of my non-”The Best…” posts have also rung a chord with readers. Here are some of those most popular ones:

1. Answers To “What Do You Do On The First Day Of School?”

2. Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Challenges

3. Excerpt From My Book On Teaching English Language Learners

4. When A “Good” Class Goes “Bad” (And Back To “Good” Again!)

5. “I Like This Lesson Because It Make Me Have a Longer Temper” (Part One)

6. ESL Carnival

7. What Do You Do To Keep Students (And You!) Focused Near The End Of The Year?

8. Reading Logs — Part Two (or “How Students Can Grow Their Brains”)

9. “let some of the players with lower batting averages go”

10. Maintaining A “Good” Class

11. Jon Stewart & Diane Ravitch Knock It Out Of The Park!

February 17, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
7 Comments

Three-Part Arne Duncan Interview On The Daily Show – An Example of Cognitive Dissonance?

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan was interviewed by Jon Stewart last night. One portion aired on television, but it was extended and the majority of it was posted only on the Web. I’ve posted all three parts below. I thought Stewart did a great job of constantly pushing Duncan, and that Duncan constantly demonstrated a text book example of cognitive dissonance — saying one thing but having done another in action. I’ve also embedded a few tweets I sent during the interview with Duncan quotes that struck me.

December 19, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Most Popular Posts Of The Year — 2011

It’s time for the annual list of my most popular blog posts of the year — determined by the number of times they’ve been visited.

You might also be interested in these previous lists:

My Most Popular Posts Of The Year — 2010

Most Popular Posts Over The First Three Years Of This Blog

The Most Popular Posts Of The Year — 2009

The Most Popular Posts Of 2008

As usual, I’m dividing the list into two sections — “The Best….” lists and other posts.

Here are My Most Popular Blog Posts Of The Year – 2010:

MOST POPULAR “THE BEST…” LISTS:

1. The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom

2. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2011

3. The Best Teacher Resources For “Foldables”

4. The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL

5. The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas

6. The Best Sites To Help Teach About 9/11

7. Not “The Best,” But “A List” Of Music Sites

8. The Best Sites For Online Photo-Editing & Photo Effects

9. The Best Websites To Help Beginning Readers

10. The Best Online Sources For Images

THE TOP POSTS THAT WERE NOT “THE BEST…” LISTS:

1. Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Challenges

2. Excerpt From My Book On Teaching English Language Learners

3. Neat! Create A Fake iPhone Text Conversation

4. Jon Stewart & Diane Ravitch Knock It Out Of The Park!

5. Answers To “What Do You Do On The First Day Of School?”

6. First Chapter of My Book, Hand-Outs & Links Are Now Online For Free

7. Two More Video Sites Like TED Talks

8. “Draw A Stickman” & Make Him Come To Life

9. Yale Makes 260,000 Images Available Online — With No Limitations On Their Usage

10. Why Is It Important For Students To Learn About Bloom’s Taxonomy?

December 11, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
5 Comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

This is always one of my favorite year-end lists to do…..

You might also be interested in:

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part One and The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2011:

The World Wildlife Fund created this amazing forty second video:

The world is where we live from WWF on Vimeo.

It publicizes another pretty impressive creation of theirs — My World.

Here are two amazing videos taken from The International Space Station:

Daniel Pink was recently interviewed on a local Washington, D.C. television show along with a local university official. You watch it all here, but I thought the few minutes he spent discussing the role of grades, autonomy and inquiry in education to be particularly thought-provoking. I used Tube Chop to “chop” those two brief segments and have them embedded below. I don’t know if they will come through on an RSS Readers, so you might have to click through to my blog in order to view them.

Near the end of the extensive Bloom’s Taxonomy lesson I describe in my book, I show some fun videos demonstrating the thinking levels through scenes from Star Wars and Pirates of the Caribbean. Links to those videos can be found at The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

The creators of those videos have now made some follow-up ones.

The Pirates of The Caribbean video has been shortened, and the sound has been enhanced so it’s easier to hear the words:

And a sequel to the Star Wars one has been made using clips from The Empire Strikes Back:

Dan Ariely has done a lot of research on motivation. Here’s a short video of him talking about pay for performance. I was particularly struck by something he says near the end. He asks if we were going in for surgery, would we want to tell the surgeon that if he/her does his job well we’ll give him a lot of money and if he doesn’t do his job well we’ll sue him, or would we rather have him just concentrate on doing his job?

Perhaps advocates of merit pay for teachers might want to think about that question, too?

If you want to teach the difference between correlation & causation, this could be the video for you…..It could be, that is, if you don’t mind using a beer commercial (Showing amazing stuff to the beer is supposed to make it amazing :) ):

Sesame Street has a fun and useful interactive YouTube video on the scientific method. I’m adding it to other interactive videos on The Best — And Easiest — Ways To Use YouTube If, Like Us, Only Teachers Have Access To It (where I also explain how I use them in class):

The PBS News Hour produced this segment on self control and young people. It uses financial literacy as an initial hook, but it’s mainly about the famous marshmallow test and a recent updated study:

Watch the full episode. See more PBS NewsHour.

If you skip through an off-color remark made by the celery near the beginning of this video, it could be a short and fun way to introduce the idea of personification to students. Check out “Meltdown: Where Last Night’s Leftovers Battle For Their Lives”:

MELTDOWN from Dave Green on Vimeo.

Transocean (greatly responsible for last year’s Gulf Oil Spill) just gave their executives huge bonuses because of their…safety record. Jon Stewart does a great short bit on it. It seems to me this is a good example of either Campbell’s Law, or and example of how incentives don’t work, or both.

Well-known and respected author/researcher David Berliner (I’ve posted about his work several times) gives a very understandable explanation of “Campbell’s Law” in this video. The “law” says:

The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it was intended to monitor.

It’s an important critique of the use of standardized tests in schools for teacher or student evaluation.

The night Diane Ravitch was the guest on the Daily Show was amazing! Here are three clips from it:

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Crisis in the Dairyland – For Richer and Poorer
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor & Satire Blog The Daily Show on Facebook

And here’s a segment from yet another Daily Show:

An amazing book, Teaching 2030:What We Must Do for Our Students and Our Public Schools–Now and in the Future, was published this year. An animated summary of the book is now available, and I’ve embedded it below. It’s worth watching both for the content and for the visuals.

Based on the fact this video has over nine million views on YouTube, I may be the last person who has seen it, but it’s still a great video to get students to think more carefully about their writing:

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 800 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

August 29, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

August’s Best Tweets

Every month I make a short list highlighting my choices of the best resources I shared through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog. Now and then, in order to make it a bit easier for me, I may try to break it up into mid-month and end-of-month lists (and sometimes I’m a bit late).

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in this post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page or subscribe to their RSS feed.

Here are my picks for August’s Best Tweets (not listed in any order):

“The Haimish Line”
by David Brooks, NY Times

“Animated Sheet Music” makes music make sense (and looks cool while doing so) video

“The Nation’s Cruelest Immigration Law” NY Times

NYTimes: Commemorating Those Lost Through Time

“How to understand regret — and 2 ways to avoid it” by Daniel Pink

“Smartphone cameras bring independence to blind people” BBC

Language Lessons by the Peace Corps

Thoughtful article on differentiated instruction by Michael Petrilli

“Jon Stewart Has Had It with How Fox Talks About Class Warfare”

Storytelling to boost scientific literacy

Do we only save the endangered animals that are cute?

How a book is made, from the Middle Ages to today

Volleyball playing dog video

The Eye On Education blog also regularly lists their favorite tweets.

August 17, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011 — So Far

I usually just do a year-end list of The Best Videos For Educators and many other topics, but it gets a little crazy having to review all of my zillion posts at once. So, to make it easier for me — and perhaps, to make it a little more useful to readers — I’m going to start publishing mid-year lists, too. These won’t be ranked, unlike my year-end “The Best…” lists, and just because a site appears on a mid-year list doesn’t guarantee it will be included in an end-of-the-year one. But, at least, I won’t have to review all my year’s posts in December…

You might also be interested in:

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part One and The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2011 — So Far:

Near the end of the extensive Bloom’s Taxonomy lesson I describe in my book, I show some fun videos demonstrating the thinking levels through scenes from Star Wars and Pirates of the Caribbean. Links to those videos can be found at The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

The creators of those videos have now made some follow-up ones.

The Pirates of The Caribbean video has been shortened, and the sound has been enhanced so it’s easier to hear the words:

And a sequel to the Star Wars one has been made using clips from The Empire Strikes Back:

Dan Ariely has done a lot of research on motivation. Here’s a short video of him talking about pay for performance. I was particularly struck by something he says near the end. He asks if we were going in for surgery, would we want to tell the surgeon that if he/her does his job well we’ll give him a lot of money and if he doesn’t do his job well we’ll sue him, or would we rather have him just concentrate on doing his job?

Perhaps advocates of merit pay for teachers might want to think about that question, too?

If you want to teach the difference between correlation & causation, this could be the video for you…..It could be, that is, if you don’t mind using a beer commercial (Showing amazing stuff to the beer is supposed to make it amazing :) ):

Sesame Street has a fun and useful interactive YouTube video on the scientific method. I’m adding it to other interactive videos on The Best — And Easiest — Ways To Use YouTube If, Like Us, Only Teachers Have Access To It (where I also explain how I use them in class):

The PBS News Hour produced this segment on self control and young people. It uses financial literacy as an initial hook, but it’s mainly about the famous marshmallow test and a recent updated study:

Watch the full episode. See more PBS NewsHour.

If you skip through an off-color remark made by the celery near the beginning of this video, it could be a short and fun way to introduce the idea of personification to students. Check out “Meltdown: Where Last Night’s Leftovers Battle For Their Lives”:

MELTDOWN from Dave Green on Vimeo.

Transocean (greatly responsible for last year’s Gulf Oil Spill) just gave their executives huge bonuses because of their…safety record. Jon Stewart does a great short bit on it. It seems to me this is a good example of either Campbell’s Law, or and example of how incentives don’t work, or both.

Well-known and respected author/researcher David Berliner (I’ve posted about his work several times) gives a very understandable explanation of “Campbell’s Law” in this video. The “law” says:

The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it was intended to monitor.

It’s an important critique of the use of standardized tests in schools for teacher or student evaluation.

The night Diane Ravitch was the guest on the Daily Show was amazing! Here are three clips from it:

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Crisis in the Dairyland – For Richer and Poorer
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor & Satire Blog The Daily Show on Facebook

And here’s a segment from yet another Daily Show:

An amazing book, Teaching 2030:What We Must Do for Our Students and Our Public Schools–Now and in the Future, was published this year. An animated summary of the book is now available, and I’ve embedded it below. It’s worth watching both for the content and for the visuals.

Based on the fact this video has over nine million views on YouTube, I may be the last person who has seen it, but it’s still a great video to get students to think more carefully about their writing:

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 700 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

July 28, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures

'make mistakes' photo (c) 2010, Mike Gifford - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Check out my New York Times post for English Language Learners is on pronouns, learning from mistakes, and J.K. Rowling. It includes a student interactive and teaching ideas….

One of the chapters in my book, Helping Students Motivate Themselves, talks about strategies and lessons to use with students about learning from mistakes and failures. I thought I’d put together a “The Best…” list that some additional related resources.

Here are my choices for The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures:

What Does Learning From Mistakes Do To Your Brain?

Of course, Michael Jordan commercial is a classic:

On the importance of failure by Cedar Riener

There’s a great website called “Admitting Failure.” (thanks to Change The Equation for the tip)

Here’s a video book trailer called “BETTER BY MISTAKE: The Unexpected Benefits of Being Wrong by Alina Tugend”

A portion of the next video is absolutely fascinating video is absolutely fascinating and shows the stages Picasso went through in order to complete a painting. It’s a great example of him making “mistakes” and learning from them. It’s by Derek Sivers, and it’s called “Why You Need To Fail.” At 9:10 he shows the Picasso footage and provides a great narration to it (thanks to Greg MacCollum for the tip).



What Is The Accurate Edison Quote On Learning From Failure?

Kevin D. Washburn has written an excellent post at The Edurati Review titled Learning from Mistakes Takes the Right Feedback. Here’s a short excerpt from it, but it’s really worth a visit and a “full read”:

“Dr. Robert Brooks (2007) suggests couching feedback in “we” statements. For example, rather than telling a student that a response is incorrect and to “try harder,” Brooks suggests, in one-on-one conversation, saying, “ strategy you’re using doesn’t seem to be working. Let’s figure out why and how we can change the strategy so that you are successful.” Such a response invites a careful investigation of the mistake and makes the interaction a problem-solving experience. A classroom environment that welcomes error as a gateway to learning contributes to better feedback responses.”

Here’s a TED Talk: Tim Harford: Trial, error and the God complex:

9 Reasons Why Failure Is Not Fatal

And, here are two “bonus” posts:

The Ten Worst Teaching Mistakes by Richard M. Felder

Sue Waters wrote a great post titled “Here’s My Top Five Mistakes Made By New Bloggers — What Are Yours?”

Why Do Some People Learn Faster? is the title of a column by Jonah Lehrer in Wired. He reviews a study that highlights the importance of learning from mistakes and failures, and ends the article with :

The problem with praising kids for their innate intelligence — the “smart” compliment — is that it misrepresents the psychological reality of education. It encourages kids to avoid the most useful kind of learning activities, which is when we learn from our mistakes. Because unless we experience the unpleasant symptoms of being wrong — that surge of Pe activity a few hundred milliseconds after the error, directing our attention to the very thing we’d like to ignore — the mind will never revise its models. We’ll keep on making the same mistakes, forsaking self-improvement for the sake of self-confidence. Samuel Beckett had the right attitude: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.”

The Art of Failing Successfully is also by Jonah Lehrer and is about the same study. However, column is a bit different and appeared in The Wall Street Journal.

How Struggle Leads to Learning is a report on a study involving three-year-olds, but I suspect it might be applicable to others, too.

“We Should Celebrate Mistakes”

A rather complicated (at least to me) study found that high-performer physicians (those who appeared to most likely prescribe an effective treatment to a patient) were far more likely to pay attention to learning from their mistakes than low-performers. These “low-performers” were more likely to demonstrate confirmation bias and focus on their successes. I actually think that study might be an important one, and I just need to set aside some time to review it again…and again until I understand it.

I’d probably only use parts of video with students, but it makes some good points on the value of mistakes.

Videos Of Students Celebrating Making Mistakes

Hearing about scientists’ struggles helps inspire students and boosts their learning is a pretty self-explanatory headline about the results of a new study.

Learning From Brilliant Mistakes and Finding Opportunity in Failures are both articles and videos related to Paul J.H. Schoemaker’s book, ‘Brilliant Mistakes.’

Mistakeville is a site where users can their mistakes and what they learned from them.

study is a few years old, but it’s new to me. It comes via ASCD, and found that children above the age of twelve are more likely to learn from their mistakes than younger kids.

Kevin Washburn discusses several research findings and expands on them at What should we be teaching? I was particularly struck by what he said under “Initiative and entrepreneurialism.”

Fascinating Study On What Learning From Mistakes Does To The Brain

The University of Pennsylvania gives “Brilliant Mistakes” awards to “people whose mistakes were most productive.”

Telling students it’s okay to fail helps them succeed — study is the title of a Valerie Strauss blog post about a recently published study. Here’s an excerpt from her post:

Telling children that it is perfectly normal to sometimes fail at school can actually help them do better academically, according to newly published research.

The results of three experiments by French researchers are not definitive but they are intuitive; kids who don’t feel overwhelming pressure to do well all the time are more likely to feel free to explore, take academic chances and not fall apart if they make a mistake.

Here are three other reports on the same study:

For Better Learning, Failure Is An Option

Reducing Academic Pressure May Help Children Succeed

Standardized Test Scores Can Improve When Kids Told They Can Fail, Study Finds is from The Huffington Post.

Videotaping Helps ESL Students Recognize Their Good Mistakes – and Learn from Them! is from Eric Roth.

“When You Fail, You Are Learning”

Teddy Roosevelt On Failure

When Have You Ever Failed at Something? What Happened as a Result? is from The New York Times Learning Network.

Sowing Failure, Reaping Success: What Failure Can Teach is also from The New York Times Learning Network.

Excellent Commencement Address On Failure By Atul Gawande

Reducing Academic Pressure May Help Children Succeed is a report on Science Daily that begins:

Children may perform better in school and feel more confident about themselves if they are told that failure is a normal part of learning, rather than being pressured to succeed at all costs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Don’t “Quiet Fix” your mistakes

What Drives You Through Setbacks — An Olympic Example is from Dan Mulhern.

Math Mistakes is a cool website I learned about from Dan Meyer.

Failure Is the Next Opportunity is from The New York Times.

Why Journal Your Mistakes? is from The Mistake Bank.

Star math teacher applies the power of failure, squared is from The Globe and Mail.

Embracing Failure is a nice collection of useful articles from Diana Laufenberg.

“Fail Again, Fail Better” is a useful video compilation of quotes about failure. Unfortunately, one of them — by Ernest Hemingway — is not quite classroom appropriate:

To Fail Or Not To Fail — That Is The Question

I’ve posted a few times about the importance of, to borrow from Carol Dweck, “celebrating” our mistakes. We humans should take advantage of that ability, as “Rubes” comic strip demonstrates:

Source: gocomics.com via Larry on Pinterest

Failure Preferred, Actually is by Rick Wormeli.

Quote Of The Day: the difference between “blameworthy” & “praiseworthy” failure

I don’t understand the number in infographic related to Einstein, but I still think it can be a useful tool:

Quote Of The Day: Talking About Failure

 

 

Making Friends With Failure is a good piece at Edutopia.

“How To Make Better Mistakes”

Quote Of The Day – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on stumbles: ‘There’s always a next move’

Video (& Writing Prompt): “A failure isn’t a failure if it prepares you for success tomorrow”

Grit, Failure & Stuff Like That

Learning from Our Mistakes is a thoughtful post from Katie Nonesuch.

23 Incredibly Successful People Who Failed At First is from Business Insider.

Two Good Videos On How We Learn & How I Plan To Use Them In Class

Memories of errors foster faster learning is from Science Daily.

Science Confirms It: If You Want To Succeed, You Have To Screw Up is from Co-Create.

Learning From Failure

Additional suggestions are welcome.

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You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

July 26, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — So Far

(NOTE: This is the second time I’m publishing this post today. For some weird reason, the first time it was published RSS Feed Readers didn’t pick it up. I know it will look a little strange to have two identical posts showing up on my blog, but I also know that Twitter and Google+ readers have already bookmarked the previous version and I didn’t want to mess them up)

I usually just do a year-end list on this topic and many others, but it gets a little crazy having to review all of my zillion posts at once. So, to make it easier for me — and perhaps, to make it a little more useful to readers — I’m going to start publishing mid-year lists, too. These won’t be ranked, unlike my year-end “The Best…” lists, and just because a site appears on a mid-year list doesn’t guarantee it will be included in an end-of-the-year one (especially since this mid-year list is so long and will have to be trimmed-down). But, at least, I won’t have to review all my year’s posts in December…

You might also be interested in these previous editions:

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — So Far:

On Treating Students & Educators ‘Like Rats in a Maze’ by Diane Ravitch

Teacher Evaluations through Student Testing by Linda Darling-Hammond

The Service of Democratic Education is a truly exceptional speech Linda Darling-Hammond gave at Teachers College of Columbia University.

On False Dichotomies and Warped Reformy Logic is from School Finance 101.

Five myths about America’s schools is an excellent Washington Post column by Post reporter Paul Farhi.

An excellent post appeared in The Washington Post’s “The Answer Sheet” titled NY regent: Why we shouldn’t link teacher evaluation to test scores.

I wrote Videotaping teachers the right way (not the Gates way) that also was in The Washington Post.

Mathematical Intimidation: Driven by the Data is by John Ewing, president of Math For America. He provides a good critique of value-added assessment.

Larry Cuban has written a very important post titled Teacher Resistance and Reform Failure

Who’s Bashing Teachers and Public Schools and What Can We Do About It? appeared in Rethinking Schools and is by Stan Karp.

What Do Teachers “Produce”? is by Diana Senechal and appeared in the Core Knowledge Blog.

The Test Generation is an article by Dana Goldstein that was published in The American Prospect magazine. It gives an excellent overview of what’s happening around the country, and particularly in Colorado, around high-stakes standardized testing.

The beatings will continue until teacher morale improves appeared in the Christian Science Monitor and is by Walt Gardner.

What I Learned at School is an op-ed in The New York Times. It’s written by novelist Marie Myung-Ok Lee.

Déjà vu all over again: A lesson from the history of school reform is by Mike Rose and appeared in The Washington Post.

Common Core Confusion – ASCD Edition is by David B. Cohen.

Race to Self Destruction: A History Lesson for Education Reformers is by Yong Zhao.

5 myths about teachers that are distracting policymakers is by Barnett Berry and appeared in The Washington Post.

I worked with a group of talented inner-city teachers from throughout the United States last year through the Center For Teaching Quality. We created a pretty thorough report, “Transforming School Conditions: Building Bridges to the Education System That Students And Teachers Deserve.” You can read my summary of the report in The Washington Post, as well as finding a link to the entire study.

The American Association of School Administrators has published the text of a speech (and the video) Diane Ravitch gave at their recent conference, and I don’t think you’re going to read or hear a better commentary on education anywhere. You can read the text of her speech here.

Here are links to the video of her speech, dividing into three parts:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Blinded by Reform is by Professor Mike Rose.

In Performance Evaluations, Subjectivity Is Not Random is from The Shanker Blog.

Matthew Di Carlo at the Shanker Blog wrote How Many Teachers Does It Take To Close An Achievement Gap?

Here’s a great column from The Seattle Times pointing out that small class sizes were important to Bill Gates when he went to school, and are an important reason why he sends his kids to the school they attend.

The Columbia Journalism Review has an excellent article on the issue of newspapers publishing teacher rankings based on test scores.

Richard Rothstein has written a great piece titled Fact-Challenged Policy.

Evaluating New York Teachers, Perhaps the Numbers Do Lie is an article from The New York Times. Check-out the equation above the headline!

Gates’ Measures of Effective Teaching Study: More Value-Added Madness is by Justin Baeder at Ed Week.

The Teaching Experience appeared on the Shanker Blog.

“It makes no sense”: Puzzling over Obama’s State of the Union Speech is the title of an excellent post by scholar Yong Zhao.

The Children Must Play: What the United States could learn from Finland about education reform is a very good article in The New Republic.

Teachers: How do We Propose to Measure Student Outcomes? is a very good post by Anthony Cody at Ed Week.

PISA For Our Time: A Balanced Look is another excellent post from The Shanker blog.

Neither Fair Nor Accurate • Research-Based Reasons Why High-Stakes Tests Should Not Be Used to Evaluate Teachers comes from Rethinking Schools.

Though it appeared in late December of last year, I’m still including Teachers’ Union Leading School Reform? Impossible! by Anthony Cody at Ed Week.

Premises, Presentation And Predetermination In The Gates MET Study appeared at the Shanker Blog.

Why organizational misconduct happens: A look at the Atlanta cheating scandal by Aaron Pallas is clearly the best and most thoughtful piece I’ve seen on the Atlanta cheating scandal.

Though it’s not an article or post, The Daily Show with Diane Ravitch has to be on this list. It was a classic. Jon Stewart opened with what was probably the most insightful, funny, and effective response I have seen to on-going teacher-bashing. Ten minutes later, Diane Ravitch came on and did a fabulous interview. The first two videos are the two segments of the amazing opening piece on schools, and then the third is the interview with Diane Ravitch:

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Crisis in the Dairyland – For Richer and Poorer
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor & Satire Blog The Daily Show on Facebook

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 700 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

July 26, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — So Far

I usually just do a year-end list on this topic and many others, but it gets a little crazy having to review all of my zillion posts at once. So, to make it easier for me — and perhaps, to make it a little more useful to readers — I’m going to start publishing mid-year lists, too. These won’t be ranked, unlike my year-end “The Best…” lists, and just because a site appears on a mid-year list doesn’t guarantee it will be included in an end-of-the-year one (especially since this mid-year list is so long and will have to be trimmed-down). But, at least, I won’t have to review all my year’s posts in December…

You might also be interested in these previous editions:

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — So Far:

On Treating Students & Educators ‘Like Rats in a Maze’ by Diane Ravitch

Teacher Evaluations through Student Testing by Linda Darling-Hammond

The Service of Democratic Education is a truly exceptional speech Linda Darling-Hammond gave at Teachers College of Columbia University.

On False Dichotomies and Warped Reformy Logic is from School Finance 101.

Five myths about America’s schools is an excellent Washington Post column by Post reporter Paul Farhi.

An excellent post appeared in The Washington Post’s “The Answer Sheet” titled NY regent: Why we shouldn’t link teacher evaluation to test scores.

I wrote Videotaping teachers the right way (not the Gates way) that also was in The Washington Post.

Mathematical Intimidation: Driven by the Data is by John Ewing, president of Math For America. He provides a good critique of value-added assessment.

Larry Cuban has written a very important post titled Teacher Resistance and Reform Failure

Who’s Bashing Teachers and Public Schools and What Can We Do About It? appeared in Rethinking Schools and is by Stan Karp.

What Do Teachers “Produce”? is by Diana Senechal and appeared in the Core Knowledge Blog.

The Test Generation is an article by Dana Goldstein that was published in The American Prospect magazine. It gives an excellent overview of what’s happening around the country, and particularly in Colorado, around high-stakes standardized testing.

The beatings will continue until teacher morale improves appeared in the Christian Science Monitor and is by Walt Gardner.

What I Learned at School is an op-ed in The New York Times. It’s written by novelist Marie Myung-Ok Lee.

Déjà vu all over again: A lesson from the history of school reform is by Mike Rose and appeared in The Washington Post.

Common Core Confusion – ASCD Edition is by David B. Cohen.

Race to Self Destruction: A History Lesson for Education Reformers is by Yong Zhao.

5 myths about teachers that are distracting policymakers is by Barnett Berry and appeared in The Washington Post.

I worked with a group of talented inner-city teachers from throughout the United States last year through the Center For Teaching Quality. We created a pretty thorough report, “Transforming School Conditions: Building Bridges to the Education System That Students And Teachers Deserve.” You can read my summary of the report in The Washington Post, as well as finding a link to the entire study.

The American Association of School Administrators has published the text of a speech (and the video) Diane Ravitch gave at their recent conference, and I don’t think you’re going to read or hear a better commentary on education anywhere. You can read the text of her speech here.

Here are links to the video of her speech, dividing into three parts:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Blinded by Reform is by Professor Mike Rose.

In Performance Evaluations, Subjectivity Is Not Random is from The Shanker Blog.

Matthew Di Carlo at the Shanker Blog wrote How Many Teachers Does It Take To Close An Achievement Gap?

Here’s a great column from The Seattle Times pointing out that small class sizes were important to Bill Gates when he went to school, and are an important reason why he sends his kids to the school they attend.

The Columbia Journalism Review has an excellent article on the issue of newspapers publishing teacher rankings based on test scores.

Richard Rothstein has written a great piece titled Fact-Challenged Policy.

Evaluating New York Teachers, Perhaps the Numbers Do Lie is an article from The New York Times. Check-out the equation above the headline!

Gates’ Measures of Effective Teaching Study: More Value-Added Madness is by Justin Baeder at Ed Week.

The Teaching Experience appeared on the Shanker Blog.

“It makes no sense”: Puzzling over Obama’s State of the Union Speech is the title of an excellent post by scholar Yong Zhao.

The Children Must Play: What the United States could learn from Finland about education reform is a very good article in The New Republic.

Teachers: How do We Propose to Measure Student Outcomes? is a very good post by Anthony Cody at Ed Week.

PISA For Our Time: A Balanced Look is another excellent post from The Shanker blog.

Neither Fair Nor Accurate • Research-Based Reasons Why High-Stakes Tests Should Not Be Used to Evaluate Teachers comes from Rethinking Schools.

Though it appeared in late December of last year, I’m still including Teachers’ Union Leading School Reform? Impossible! by Anthony Cody at Ed Week.

Premises, Presentation And Predetermination In The Gates MET Study appeared at the Shanker Blog.

Why organizational misconduct happens: A look at the Atlanta cheating scandal by Aaron Pallas is clearly the best and most thoughtful piece I’ve seen on the Atlanta cheating scandal.

Though it’s not an article or post, The Daily Show with Diane Ravitch has to be on this list. It was a classic. Jon Stewart opened with what was probably the most insightful, funny, and effective response I have seen to on-going teacher-bashing. Ten minutes later, Diane Ravitch came on and did a fabulous interview. The first two videos are the two segments of the amazing opening piece on schools, and then the third is the interview with Diane Ravitch:

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Crisis in the Dairyland – For Richer and Poorer
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor & Satire Blog The Daily Show on Facebook

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 700 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.