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August 30, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2016

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Every year for the past 48 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues (you can see my posts from previous years here). This year’s poll results were just released, though I haven’t had time to thoroughly review them yet.

One finding that clearly stands-out is that respondents overwhelming feel that schools should not be closed (see The Best Posts & Articles On The Impact Of School Closures — Suggest More!).

Here are what seem to me to be the most thoughtful reflections on the survey by those who have had a chance to review it (I’ll add more as they come in):

Of course, you’ll want to start off by visiting the PDK site itself and, at least, review its summary.

Vast Majority of Americans Want Failing Schools Fixed, Not Closed, Poll Finds is from Education Week.

Four charts reveal what Americans think about the biggest education fights, including school closures and opt out is from New York Chalkbeat.

What’s the Purpose of Education? Public Doesn’t Agree on the Answer is from NEA Today.

August 23, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2015

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Every year for the past 47 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues (you can see my posts from previous years here). This year’s poll results were just released, though I haven’t had time to thoroughly review them yet.

You can read all the results at their site.

I’ll be adding commentaries from others, but here are a few for now:

Poll: Most Americans oppose key tenets of modern school reform is from The Washington Post.

U.S. schools are too focused on standardized tests, poll says is also from The Washington Post.

AFT Responds to PDK-Gallup Poll appears in Diane Ravitch’s blog.

What Does the 2015 PDK/Gallup Poll Tell About Teacher Leadership? is by Barnett Berry.

Gallup: Many Americans oppose linking teacher evaluations to kids’ test performance is from The Associated Press.

Here’s what happens when you ask parents multiple-choice questions is from The L.A. Times.

Two Polls Span Two Poles On Testing is from NPR.

Very Interesting: Poll Finds That Students’ Feeling Engaged & Hopeful Are Top Indicators Of Successful School

What Do Americans Really Think About Education Policy? is from The Atlantic.

August 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released – Not Good News For President Obama

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Every year for the past 45 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released.

You can read a summary and the entire poll results here.

I’m going to just reprint parts of their press release because it gives a good overview of the results.First, though, here are links to my posts about the poll in previous years:

This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

Here’s are excerpts from their press release:

The American public has sharpened its belief that the federal government should not play a dominant role in public education, with a majority saying they simply do not support initiatives that they believe were created or promoted by federal policymakers, a new survey shows.

Moreover, only 27 percent of respondents give President Barack Obama a grade of “A” or “B” for his performance in support of public schools – down from 41 percent in 2011. A majority of those surveyed, 54 percent, do not think standardized tests are helpful to teachers; many do not understand how charter schools work, and the number of Americans saying they are familiar with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has skyrocketed in just one year, with a majority
saying they oppose the standards….

…The new survey suggests the American public has a lot more confidence in local school systems than in the federal government. Fifty percent gave their local schools a grade of “A” or “B” and 56 percent said their local school board should have the greatest influence in deciding what was taught. Only 15 percent thought the federal government should have the most influence.

Yet when the focus was shifted from the respondents’ own local schools to ask about the performance of the nation’s schools in general, only 17 percent extended a grade of “B” or better to America’s schools….

….When asked a series of questions about standardized testing, the public generally supported various specialized tests such as those used for college entrance and Advanced Placement courses. But 54 percent of those questioned said they simply do not believe standardized testing in the classroom really helps local school teachers decide what to teach. Public school parents are even more negative about the value of standardized testing with 68 percent believing they are not helpful to teachers.

August 21, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)

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Every year for the past 45 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released.

You can read a summary and the entire poll results here.

I’ll share a few pieces of information that stand-out to me but, first, here are links to my posts about the poll in previous years:

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

The Educated Reporter has already published their analysis of the data.

Here are quotes that I consider to be the highlights from the poll results:

Fewer than 25% of Americans believe increased testing has helped the performance of local public schools.

In just one year, Americans reversed their opinion, and now 58% oppose requiring that teacher evaluations include student scores on standardized tests.

Almost two of three Americans oppose releasing information to newspapers about how students of individual teachers perform on standardized tests.

Almost two of three Americans have never heard of the Common Core State Standards, arguably one of the most important education initiatives in decades, and most of those who say they know about the Common Core neither understand it nor embrace it….Among the third who had heard of the Common Core, only four of 10 said the standards can help make education in the United States more competitive globally; a majority said the standards will make the U.S. less competitive or have no effect.

Americans said their children are safe at school,and they reject the idea of arming teachers and principals.

A majority of Americans give the public schools in their community an A or B — the highest rating ever recorded by this poll — but fewer than one of five would give the schools nationally a B or better.

Americans value having schools teach 21st-century skills such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity.

More than 70% of Americans have trust and confidence in the men and women who teach in public schools, and 65% have trust in public school principals. These percentages are even higher for Americans under the age of 40.

Lack of financial support continues to be the biggest problem facing public schools. Public school parents agree, and they see overcrowding as the second biggest problem. Three new concerns rose to near the top of the list of the biggest problems facing public schools: lack of parental support, difficulties in getting good teachers, and testing requirements and regulations.

About the only good news for “school reformers” is this: Americans’ support for public charter schools remains high at slightly less than 70%, and two of three Americans support new public charter schools in their communities.

However, even that news is somewhat tempered with this: Seventy percent of Americans oppose private school vouchers — the highest level of opposition to vouchers ever recorded in this survey.

The question is: What will “school reformers” do in response? Will they moderate their positions and come to the table to compromise, or will they double-down in self-righteousness and zeal (and get a lot more money from Gates, Walton, Broad, etc.)?

August 24, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

Every year for the past 44 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released. I’ve been out of town for the past couple of days, and haven’t had a chance to review it in-depth. I thought, though, that it would be useful to share with readers some of the commentaries on the poll that will be on on my reading list this weekend.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

Here are my choices for The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012:

Poll: Americans’ views on public education is by Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post.

What the PDK/Gallup Poll Says About U.S. Education (And How It Compares to Finland) is by Barnett Berry.

Changes in the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools is at The Learning First blog.

Analyzing the new PDK/Gallup poll on how Americans view public education is by Diane Ravitch.

The Seven Most Surprising Findings of the 2012 PDK/Gallup Poll on Public Schools is from Ed Week.

Poll: Attitudes soften over children of illegal immigrants is from USA Today.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over nine hundred other “The Best…” lists.

August 17, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll

Earlier this morning, the results of the latest Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Poll On Education issues were released. I thought I’d pull together some good analyses and reports on it, and will continue to add to this list.

Here are my choices for The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Poll On Education:

Poll: Americans Trust Teachers, Split on Teachers’ Unions is from Education Week.

New poll: Public trusts teachers, likes technology and school choice is from Hechinger Ed.

Here is the poll itself.

I wrote a brief post late last night that shares my various posts on the polls from previous years.

Poll: Parents give thumbs up to local schools is from USA Today.

Stephen Krashen writes about the fact that “parents rate their local schools much more positively than they do schools in the US in general” and points to a Gerald Bracey article that elaborates on why.

Americans Dislike Teachers’ Unions, But Dislike State Governors More is from The Atlantic.

The Public Has Spoken! is from Learning First.

What Americans Think About Teachers Versus What They’re Hearing is from The Shanker Blog.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

November 26, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – Part Two

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It’s time for another of my end-of-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,600 “The Best…” lists here).

I’m adding this one to All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – So Far

The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On Education Policy In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) On Education Policy In One Place

All My 2012 “The Best…” Lists On Education Policy In One Place

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Polcy In 2011 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – Part Two (let me know what you think I’m missing – this post is different from my annual “round-up” of the biggest education-related news stories I write for The Washington Post every year) – these are not listed in any order of preference (I’m starting off with links to “Best” lists I’ve posted over the past few months that relate to ed policy):

The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education

The Best Articles On What The Trump Presidency Might Mean For Schools

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2016

The Best Articles For Learning About Laurene Powell Jobs’ Project To Redesign High Schools

The Best Posts On The Value Of Ethnic Studies Classes – Help Me Find More

The Best Glossaries Of Education Terminology

The Washington Post published a column I wrote about what school was like the day after the Presidential election, ‘Dear President-elect Trump’: Immigrant students write letters asking for ‘the opportunity to demonstrate we are good people.’ There was a reaction to the similar stories many other teachers shared – read No, Most Educators Are Not “Fueling Student Anxieties” – Trump Is Handling That On His Own.

Why the History of School Reform is Essential for Policymakers, Practitioners, and Researchers is by Larry Cuban. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Providing An “Overall” Perspective On Education Policy.

Rethinking School Discipline is from The American Prospect. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Restorative Practices – Help Me Find More.

Five myths about charter schools is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

There is ‘Hope That ESSA Will Bring Positive Change To Classrooms’ is the headline of one of  my latest Education Week Teacher columns. In it, Randi Weingarten, Barnett Berry, Morgan Polikoff, Erik M. Francis, and Jacki Gran wrote how they believe The Every Student Succeeds Act will affect classroom practice.

From Deficiency to Strength: Shifting the Mindset about Education Inequality is by Yong Zhao. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits.

I wouldn’t necessarily say this is one of the “best” pieces on Ed Policy, but I think readers will find the entire post very interesting: A Report On EdSource Symposium On California Ed, Including What I Said About State Assessments.

The Bush Institute released an interactive on education so you can compare schools in 114 cities. The State of our Cities project appears surprisingly interesting and objective. It does not appear – at least to me – that they have any ax to grind in the school reform debate, and list useful stats. You can read more about it at Ed Week’s article, New Website to Compare Cities’ Education Results Makes Debut. I’m adding this info to The Best Places To Get Reliable, Valid, Accessible & Useful Education Data.

An open letter to editors of the New York Times (and most other American periodicals). is by Daniel Willingham.

Why firing bad teachers isn’t nearly as important as creating good ones is from The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On California Court Case Attacking Teacher’s Rights.

Education Matters, But Direct Anti-Poverty and Inequality-Reduction Efforts Matter More is by Ben Spielberg. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Why Improving Education Is Not THE Answer To Poverty & Inequality.

Reforms That Stick: How Schools Change is by Larry Cuban.

Five Thirty Eight published a piece worth reading headlined The Economic Recovery Hasn’t Reached America’s Schools.

The Education Commission of the States has put out what may be the most accessible, and short, guide to The Every Student Succeeds Act. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding The Every Student Succeeds Act.

Foundations Unfiltered is a behind-the-scenes peek at education foundations. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Anthony Byrk coins a new -at least, to me – term, “practice-based evidence,” in his piece, Accelerating How We Learn to Improve. Here’s how he describes it:

The choice of words practice-based evidence is deliberate. We aim to signal a key difference in the relationship between inquiry and improvement as compared to that typically assumed in the more commonly used expression evidence-based practice. Implicit in the latter is that evidence of efficacy exists somewhere outside of local practice and practitioners should simply implement these evidence-based practices. Improvement research, in contrast, is an ongoing, local learning activity.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

America’s Not-So-Broken Education System is by Jack Schneider. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Pointing Out That Our Schools Are Not Failing — Please Suggest More.

Teacher Unions Are ‘Bargaining for the Common Good’ is from The American Prospect. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why Teachers Unions Are Important.

John Oliver did this great segment, with classroom appropriate language (except for one “sh_tty”), on charter schools:

He did this one on school segregation. It’s good, though I put it on this blog reluctantly because of some classroom inappropriate language:

What do you think I’m missing?

September 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

September’s “Best” Lists – There Are Now 1,610 Of Them

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Here’s my regular round-up of new “The Best…” lists I posted this month (you can see all 1,610 of them categorized here):

The Best Resources For Learning About Total Physical Response (TPR)

The Best Resources On Different Types Of Map Projections

The Best Resources On The Smithsonian’s African-American Museum

The Best Research On How Many Decisions A Teacher Makes Each Day

The Best Articles For Learning About Laurene Powell Jobs’ Project To Redesign High Schools

The Best Posts On Looking At Our Students Through The Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Learning About Google Classroom

The Best Resources For “Do Now” Activities To Begin A Class

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2016

The Best Resources On Which Is Best – Reading Digitally Or Reading Paper?

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2016

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