Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released – Not Good News For President Obama

The-American-public-has

Every year for the past 45 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released.

You can read a summary and the entire poll results here.

I’m going to just reprint parts of their press release because it gives a good overview of the results.First, though, here are links to my posts about the poll in previous years:

This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

Here’s are excerpts from their press release:

The American public has sharpened its belief that the federal government should not play a dominant role in public education, with a majority saying they simply do not support initiatives that they believe were created or promoted by federal policymakers, a new survey shows.

Moreover, only 27 percent of respondents give President Barack Obama a grade of “A” or “B” for his performance in support of public schools – down from 41 percent in 2011. A majority of those surveyed, 54 percent, do not think standardized tests are helpful to teachers; many do not understand how charter schools work, and the number of Americans saying they are familiar with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has skyrocketed in just one year, with a majority
saying they oppose the standards….

…The new survey suggests the American public has a lot more confidence in local school systems than in the federal government. Fifty percent gave their local schools a grade of “A” or “B” and 56 percent said their local school board should have the greatest influence in deciding what was taught. Only 15 percent thought the federal government should have the most influence.

Yet when the focus was shifted from the respondents’ own local schools to ask about the performance of the nation’s schools in general, only 17 percent extended a grade of “B” or better to America’s schools….

….When asked a series of questions about standardized testing, the public generally supported various specialized tests such as those used for college entrance and Advanced Placement courses. But 54 percent of those questioned said they simply do not believe standardized testing in the classroom really helps local school teachers decide what to teach. Public school parents are even more negative about the value of standardized testing with 68 percent believing they are not helpful to teachers.

August 21, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)

Fewer-than-25-of

Every year for the past 45 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released.

You can read a summary and the entire poll results here.

I’ll share a few pieces of information that stand-out to me but, first, here are links to my posts about the poll in previous years:

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

The Educated Reporter has already published their analysis of the data.

Here are quotes that I consider to be the highlights from the poll results:

Fewer than 25% of Americans believe increased testing has helped the performance of local public schools.

In just one year, Americans reversed their opinion, and now 58% oppose requiring that teacher evaluations include student scores on standardized tests.

Almost two of three Americans oppose releasing information to newspapers about how students of individual teachers perform on standardized tests.

Almost two of three Americans have never heard of the Common Core State Standards, arguably one of the most important education initiatives in decades, and most of those who say they know about the Common Core neither understand it nor embrace it….Among the third who had heard of the Common Core, only four of 10 said the standards can help make education in the United States more competitive globally; a majority said the standards will make the U.S. less competitive or have no effect.

Americans said their children are safe at school,and they reject the idea of arming teachers and principals.

A majority of Americans give the public schools in their community an A or B — the highest rating ever recorded by this poll — but fewer than one of five would give the schools nationally a B or better.

Americans value having schools teach 21st-century skills such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity.

More than 70% of Americans have trust and confidence in the men and women who teach in public schools, and 65% have trust in public school principals. These percentages are even higher for Americans under the age of 40.

Lack of financial support continues to be the biggest problem facing public schools. Public school parents agree, and they see overcrowding as the second biggest problem. Three new concerns rose to near the top of the list of the biggest problems facing public schools: lack of parental support, difficulties in getting good teachers, and testing requirements and regulations.

About the only good news for “school reformers” is this: Americans’ support for public charter schools remains high at slightly less than 70%, and two of three Americans support new public charter schools in their communities.

However, even that news is somewhat tempered with this: Seventy percent of Americans oppose private school vouchers — the highest level of opposition to vouchers ever recorded in this survey.

The question is: What will “school reformers” do in response? Will they moderate their positions and come to the table to compromise, or will they double-down in self-righteousness and zeal (and get a lot more money from Gates, Walton, Broad, etc.)?

August 24, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

Every year for the past 44 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released. I’ve been out of town for the past couple of days, and haven’t had a chance to review it in-depth. I thought, though, that it would be useful to share with readers some of the commentaries on the poll that will be on on my reading list this weekend.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

Here are my choices for The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012:

Poll: Americans’ views on public education is by Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post.

What the PDK/Gallup Poll Says About U.S. Education (And How It Compares to Finland) is by Barnett Berry.

Changes in the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools is at The Learning First blog.

Analyzing the new PDK/Gallup poll on how Americans view public education is by Diane Ravitch.

The Seven Most Surprising Findings of the 2012 PDK/Gallup Poll on Public Schools is from Ed Week.

Poll: Attitudes soften over children of illegal immigrants is from USA Today.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over nine hundred other “The Best…” lists.

August 17, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll

Earlier this morning, the results of the latest Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Poll On Education issues were released. I thought I’d pull together some good analyses and reports on it, and will continue to add to this list.

Here are my choices for The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Poll On Education:

Poll: Americans Trust Teachers, Split on Teachers’ Unions is from Education Week.

New poll: Public trusts teachers, likes technology and school choice is from Hechinger Ed.

Here is the poll itself.

I wrote a brief post late last night that shares my various posts on the polls from previous years.

Poll: Parents give thumbs up to local schools is from USA Today.

Stephen Krashen writes about the fact that “parents rate their local schools much more positively than they do schools in the US in general” and points to a Gerald Bracey article that elaborates on why.

Americans Dislike Teachers’ Unions, But Dislike State Governors More is from The Atlantic.

The Public Has Spoken! is from Learning First.

What Americans Think About Teachers Versus What They’re Hearing is from The Shanker Blog.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

July 26, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – So Far.

Here are this week’s picks:

Kappan’s Common Core Writing Project is “a forum for ideas about implementing the Common Core standards. We invite educators to share stories about what works (and what doesn’t) in realizing the best 21st-century education for all children.” I’m adding it to The Most Useful Resources For Implementing Common Core — I Hope You’ll Contribute More.

Reforming the Teaching of History Then and Now (Part 1) and Then and Now in Reforming the Teaching of History (Part 2) are both by Larry Cuban.

100% Upgrades offers some useful classroom management advice from Doug Lemov. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Classroom Management. You might also be interested in The Best Commentaries On “Teach Like A Champion” – Help Me Find More.

Books My Reluctant Readers Love To Read is from Kelly Gallagher.

Teachers’ New Homework: a ‘Watchman’ Plan is from The Wall Street Journal.

Educator Cornelius Minor has graciously shared some helpful sheets for teaching reading comprehension. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Reading Strategies & Comprehension – Help Me Find More!.

Motivation and instruction is from Pragmatic Education. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students.

I’m adding this next tweet to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction:

Interesting info from John Hattie:

July 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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SEL Weekly Update

I’ve recently begun this weekly post where I’ll be sharing resources I’m adding to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources or other related “Best” lists:

Carol Dweck and Growth Mindset is a well-done and interesting thirty minute BBC interview with Carol Dweck and her associates. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

Why a ‘Growth Mindset’ Won’t Work is a very good column by Peter DeWitt. I’m adding it to the same list.

I think this next article is also very good, and am adding the tweet to the same list:

I’m also adding this next tweet to the same list:

June 17, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Common Core & Social Emotional Learning

Here are some useful resources connecting Social Emotional Learning with Common Core Standards. I’m adding them to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources (you’ll be able to find other related resources already there):

Social and emotional learning gaining new focus under Common Core is a very useful and interesting article published by Ed Source.

How Are Social-Emotional Learning and the Common Core Connected? is by Maurice Elias.

Social-emotional skills can boost Common Core implementation is also by Maurice Elias.

Teaching The Whole Child

How to Integrate Social-Emotional Learning into Common Core is from The Greater Good Science Center.

Integrating Social Emotional Curricula and the Common Core is from Inside the Classroom, Outside The Box.

Webinar: Social-Emotional Learning Integrated with Academic Literacy Equals Secondary Students’ Common Core Success is from WestEd.

Webinar Recording: Where Does Resiliency Fit in the Common Core? is from ScholarCentric.

Resiliency Key to Students’ Success in Common Core is from the same group.

June 9, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Resources On Race & Racism

Here are new additions to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More:

The only good news about the McKinney pool party is the white kids’ response to racism is from Vox.

Educate to Liberate: Build an Anti-Racist Classroom is from Edutopia.

The Flexibility of Racial Bias is from Scientific American.

Is It An ‘Uprising’ Or A ‘Riot’? Depends On Who’s Watching is from NPR.

Teaching While White is from Teaching Tolerance.

The #BlackLivesMatter Movement: Marches And Tweets For Healing is from NPR.