Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released – Not Good News For President Obama

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Every year for the past 45 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released.

You can read a summary and the entire poll results here.

I’m going to just reprint parts of their press release because it gives a good overview of the results.First, though, here are links to my posts about the poll in previous years:

This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

Here’s are excerpts from their press release:

The American public has sharpened its belief that the federal government should not play a dominant role in public education, with a majority saying they simply do not support initiatives that they believe were created or promoted by federal policymakers, a new survey shows.

Moreover, only 27 percent of respondents give President Barack Obama a grade of “A” or “B” for his performance in support of public schools – down from 41 percent in 2011. A majority of those surveyed, 54 percent, do not think standardized tests are helpful to teachers; many do not understand how charter schools work, and the number of Americans saying they are familiar with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has skyrocketed in just one year, with a majority
saying they oppose the standards….

…The new survey suggests the American public has a lot more confidence in local school systems than in the federal government. Fifty percent gave their local schools a grade of “A” or “B” and 56 percent said their local school board should have the greatest influence in deciding what was taught. Only 15 percent thought the federal government should have the most influence.

Yet when the focus was shifted from the respondents’ own local schools to ask about the performance of the nation’s schools in general, only 17 percent extended a grade of “B” or better to America’s schools….

….When asked a series of questions about standardized testing, the public generally supported various specialized tests such as those used for college entrance and Advanced Placement courses. But 54 percent of those questioned said they simply do not believe standardized testing in the classroom really helps local school teachers decide what to teach. Public school parents are even more negative about the value of standardized testing with 68 percent believing they are not helpful to teachers.

August 21, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)

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Every year for the past 45 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released.

You can read a summary and the entire poll results here.

I’ll share a few pieces of information that stand-out to me but, first, here are links to my posts about the poll in previous years:

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

The Educated Reporter has already published their analysis of the data.

Here are quotes that I consider to be the highlights from the poll results:

Fewer than 25% of Americans believe increased testing has helped the performance of local public schools.

In just one year, Americans reversed their opinion, and now 58% oppose requiring that teacher evaluations include student scores on standardized tests.

Almost two of three Americans oppose releasing information to newspapers about how students of individual teachers perform on standardized tests.

Almost two of three Americans have never heard of the Common Core State Standards, arguably one of the most important education initiatives in decades, and most of those who say they know about the Common Core neither understand it nor embrace it….Among the third who had heard of the Common Core, only four of 10 said the standards can help make education in the United States more competitive globally; a majority said the standards will make the U.S. less competitive or have no effect.

Americans said their children are safe at school,and they reject the idea of arming teachers and principals.

A majority of Americans give the public schools in their community an A or B — the highest rating ever recorded by this poll — but fewer than one of five would give the schools nationally a B or better.

Americans value having schools teach 21st-century skills such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity.

More than 70% of Americans have trust and confidence in the men and women who teach in public schools, and 65% have trust in public school principals. These percentages are even higher for Americans under the age of 40.

Lack of financial support continues to be the biggest problem facing public schools. Public school parents agree, and they see overcrowding as the second biggest problem. Three new concerns rose to near the top of the list of the biggest problems facing public schools: lack of parental support, difficulties in getting good teachers, and testing requirements and regulations.

About the only good news for “school reformers” is this: Americans’ support for public charter schools remains high at slightly less than 70%, and two of three Americans support new public charter schools in their communities.

However, even that news is somewhat tempered with this: Seventy percent of Americans oppose private school vouchers — the highest level of opposition to vouchers ever recorded in this survey.

The question is: What will “school reformers” do in response? Will they moderate their positions and come to the table to compromise, or will they double-down in self-righteousness and zeal (and get a lot more money from Gates, Walton, Broad, etc.)?

August 24, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012

Every year for the past 44 years, Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup have done a Poll On Education issues. This year’s poll results were just released. I’ve been out of town for the past couple of days, and haven’t had a chance to review it in-depth. I thought, though, that it would be useful to share with readers some of the commentaries on the poll that will be on on my reading list this weekend.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll (2011).

Here are my choices for The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll — 2012:

Poll: Americans’ views on public education is by Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post.

What the PDK/Gallup Poll Says About U.S. Education (And How It Compares to Finland) is by Barnett Berry.

Changes in the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools is at The Learning First blog.

Analyzing the new PDK/Gallup poll on how Americans view public education is by Diane Ravitch.

The Seven Most Surprising Findings of the 2012 PDK/Gallup Poll on Public Schools is from Ed Week.

Poll: Attitudes soften over children of illegal immigrants is from USA Today.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over nine hundred other “The Best…” lists.

August 17, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll

Earlier this morning, the results of the latest Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Poll On Education issues were released. I thought I’d pull together some good analyses and reports on it, and will continue to add to this list.

Here are my choices for The Best Posts/Articles On This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Poll On Education:

Poll: Americans Trust Teachers, Split on Teachers’ Unions is from Education Week.

New poll: Public trusts teachers, likes technology and school choice is from Hechinger Ed.

Here is the poll itself.

I wrote a brief post late last night that shares my various posts on the polls from previous years.

Poll: Parents give thumbs up to local schools is from USA Today.

Stephen Krashen writes about the fact that “parents rate their local schools much more positively than they do schools in the US in general” and points to a Gerald Bracey article that elaborates on why.

Americans Dislike Teachers’ Unions, But Dislike State Governors More is from The Atlantic.

The Public Has Spoken! is from Learning First.

What Americans Think About Teachers Versus What They’re Hearing is from The Shanker Blog.

Additional suggestions are welcome.

If you’ve found this list helpful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might want to also view the over seven hundred other “The Best…” lists.

December 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

Here are this week’s picks:

How to Close Read the Language of Film is from Middleweb. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading.”

Maurice J. Elias has written a very useful article titled Social-emotional skills can boost Common Core implementation for Phi Delta Kappan. Unfortunately, if you’re not a subscriber, it costs $5, which I thought was worth paying. I’m adding it to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

Here’s some good teaching advice:

August 30, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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August’s Best Posts From This Blog

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I regularly highlight my picks for the most useful posts for each month — not including “The Best…” lists. I also use some of them in a more extensive monthly newsletter I send-out. You can see older Best Posts of the Month at Websites Of The Month (more recent lists can be found here).

Here are some of the posts I personally think are the best, and most helpful, ones I’ve written during this past month (not in any order of preference):

Social Emotional Learning Can Help, But More Research Shows It’s Not Enough

“Building a Community of Self-Motivated Learners” Is Title Of My Next Book

All My Education Week Teachers Posts From Past Two Years In One Place

Bill Gates’ Employee Evaluation Process

This Is The Best Video I’ve Seen On Perseverance & Resilience: “There’s no dishonor in having a disability”

Discussion Questions & Resources For Combined #engchat & #sschat On Monday

USA Weekend Feature Article: “What teachers want you to know”

This Year’s Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup Education Poll Just Released — Here Are Highlights (& “Reformers” Are Not Going To Be Happy)Guest Post: Commentary On New IB Theory Of Knowledge Guide From Author Of Bestselling TOK Textbook

I’m Now Writing A Weekly Post For The NY Times On Teaching ELLs

Great Illustration On The Shelf-Life Of Knowledge

Wow, Google Street View “Treks” Site Is Impressive!

If You Don’t Have Teacher Access To YouTube At Your School, Then This Search Engine is a “Must”

Lingua.ly Is A Useful Tool For Second-Language Learners

“Rewordify” Is One Of The Most Unique Sites Out There For English Language Learners & Others

This May Be The Best Geography Site Of The Year: “40 maps that explain the world”

Attention IB Theory Of Knowledge Teachers: How Is The New TOK Guide Going To Affect How You Teach?

“Mighty Meeting” Lets You Easily Create Free Online Meetings For An Unlimited Number Of Participants

“BrainRush” Lets You Create Online Learning Activities & Monitor Student Progress

Updated “Best and Worst Education News of 2013 — So Far”

“A Good Beginning is More Than Half of the Whole”

“Why we can’t all get along over school reform”

Quote Of The Day: “A Question That Can Change Your Life”

Do We Want A “Community Of Learners” Or A “Classroom Of Students”?

“Ways To Start Off The New Year On A Positive Note – Part One”

Create Your Own “Escape The Room” Game With “Room Escape Maker”

Two Great Sites – SAS Curriculum Pathways & Awesome Stories – Upgrading Big Time This Month

Excellent Article On Teaching Making Home Visits — & It Features Our School!

Deliberate Practice, Myelin & The Brain

Video: Cookie Monster Sings — I Kid You Not — About Self Regulation

Ask A Classroom Question, Any Classroom Question….

A Site For Teaching ELLs About Adjectives & TOK Students About Perception

Chaplin & Keaton Silent Movies For English Language Learners

Now This Is The Classroom Management Mindset I Need To Have….

Yet Another Good Piece For Students On Learning & The Brain

 

August 22, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Delusional School “Reformers” In California

Yesterday, at the end of my post on the new Gallup Poll showing public opposition to the school “reformer” agenda growing dramatically, I asked:

The question is: What will “school reformers” do in response? Will they moderate their positions and come to the table to compromise, or will they double-down in self-righteousness and zeal (and get a lot more money from Gates, Walton, Broad, etc.)?

It didn’t take long to get a response to that question here in California — Marshall Tuck, a leading school “reformer” in Los Angeles, has just announced his candidacy for the California Superintendent of Public Instruction. He’ll be opposing incumbent Tom Torlakson, who is probably the most progressive State Superintendent in the country.

So let me get this straight — the “reformer” agenda is opposed by growing majorities in polls; despite spending huge amounts of money in the recent Los Angeles school board elections, “reformers” suffered major defeats; and their candidate for the State Superintendent position in the last election, Gloria Romero, didn’t even make the run-off — yet, despite all that, they’re going to go after a popular incumbent who is supported by a popular Governor (Jerry Brown), who has been publicly opposing a large part of the school “reformer” agenda.

Delusional is the only word I can think of to describe their thinking….

June 5, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: “Which road will we choose?”

Which road will we choose? is a post by Arthur Camins, director of the Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education. It’s related to his recent article in Phi Delta Kappan, Two Roads Diverge for American Education (unfortunately, the article is behind a paywall).

Here’s an excerpt:

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