Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 11, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Video: Excellent Michael Sandel Interview On Ethics

sandel

I’ve previously posted a lot about the work of Harvard professor Michael Sandel.

Here’s an older video clip
of an interview he did on NBC. I use it in my IB Theory of Knowledge class when we’re studying Ethics.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

June 29, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Michael Sandel: Should we pay children to read?”

I’ve written a lot about the work of Harvard Professor Michael Sandel.

Here’s short video where he’s considering the question “Should we pay children to read?” He gets to the crux of the matter in the final couple of minutes:

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students.

It’s particularly timely because of this past week’s release of a study on paying students to work harder on tests, which I’ve written about at:

Can’t Economists Stay Away From Schools? Don’t They Have Enough Other Things To Do?

Part Two Of “Can’t Economists Stay Away From Schools?” — My Worst Fears Realized

June 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2016 – So Far

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It’s time for another “Best” list to add to All Mid-Year 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place.

I’ll also be adding this post to All Of My Theory Of Knowledge “Best” Lists In One Place!
Here are my previous TOK-related “Best” lists:

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources — 2010

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – So Far

The Best Commentaries On The New IB Theory Of Knowledge Teaching Guide

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Movies For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes – What Are Your Suggestions?

The Best Posts On IB Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Posts On Teaching TOK “Knowledge Questions”

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – So Far

Here are my picks from the past six months:

Atul Gawande gave the commencement address at CalTech this month, and The New Yorker published his speech under the headline “A Mistrust Of Science.”

Here’s an excerpt:

The-scientist-has-an

The whole piece would be useful in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when discussing science. I especially like his discussion of pseudoscience (you might also be interested in Video: Bill Nye On Pseudo-Science.

TOK Connection: “Pearls Before Swine” Does Another Version Of “Who’s On First?”

Here’s What My Theory Of Knowledge Students Will Be Doing For Their “Finals” – What Are You Doing?

I’ve described in one of my New York Times posts how I use illusions with English Language Learners, and I obviously use them in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when studying Perception. I learned from Michelle Henry about a series of illusions created by Mexican painter Octavio Ocampo who, I’m embarrassed to say, was not familiar with prior to seeing this work. Go take a visit — they’re amazing!

Police Body Cameras: What Do You See? is a new very impressive interactive at The New York Times. After first soliciting the reader’s general feelings about the police, the interactive shows several staged police encounters from different cameras and angles – asking you to judge what you think you saw. Then, those judgments are compared to other what others said and their feelings about the police. It’s extraordinarily useful to just about any class, and will be a superior addition to my Theory of Knowledge lesson on perception,Videos: Here’s The Simple Theory of Knowledge Lesson On Perception I Did Today. That post shares several other videos showing the same event from different angles.

Over 2,500 Categorized Resources For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes

You may, or may not, be familiar with the BBC’s “A History of Ideas.” It’s a show with 72 one-hour podcasts and 48 accompanying short video animations about philosophy. You can access all the podcasts and videos on the BBC site, which is particularly nice since a lot of the other material on the BBC won’t play in the United States. All the video animations are also on YouTube.

Lesson Plan | I Remember: Teaching About the Role of Memory Across the Curriculum is from The New York Times Learning Network, and is great for IB Theory of Knowledge classes.

NPR Videos On Serendipity In Science

Great Idea From Adam Grant: Student Mini-Talks That Challenge “Conventional Wisdom”

Five Videos Demonstrating The McGurk Effect

Videos On Milgram & Stanford Prison Experiments – Not Blocked By YouTube Safety Mode

A Handy Compendium of 2015 TOK posts, downloadable is a series of posts by Eileen and Theo Dombrowski. Eileen is co-author of one of the most popular IB Theory of Knowledge textbooks.

I think TOK teachers might find these next two links particularly helpful:

Oral Presentation Suggestions For IB Theory of Knowledge Classes

Part Two – Oral Presentation Suggestions For IB Theory of Knowledge Classes

Here’s a new video on the famous ethics “trolley problem.” I’m adding it to The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem.”

Here’s A Nice Lesson I Did On Ethics In My Theory Of Knowledge Class

Killing Baby Hitler & Student “What If?” Projects

The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About Plato’s Allegory Of The Cave

My 2014 post, New “Fillable” PDF Forms For IB Theory Of Knowledge Presentations & Essays, has been very popular, with TOK teachers from around the world not wanting to brave the IB website just to download some simple forms. Instead, they’ve just gone to that post, and I haven’t heard any objections from IB about my making them available. In January, though, I heard from TOK teacher Vladi Stanojevic that, in their infinite wisdom, IB  decided to make some changes to the Presentations form (the Essay form appears to be the same):

Here’s the new “fillable” PDF Presentations form.

It’s very similar to the old one, except it doesn’t have space for the candidates names. It does seem odd that they have entirely removed any space for student names, but I’ve given up trying to figure out IB decisions….

I’ve previously posted a lot about the work of Harvard professor Michael Sandel. Here’s an older video clip of an interview he did on NBC. I use it in my IB Theory of Knowledge class when we’re studying Ethics.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

I’ve previously written about the great work of Professor Philip Tetlock, and you can find my past posts about him at The Best Resources On The Importance Of Knowing What You Don’t Know. The Washington Post published an article about his recent work – check out The secrets the world’s top experts use to make really good predictions. As far as I’m concerned, here’s the “money quote” from that piece, and it’s perfect for IB Theory of Knowledge classes:

beliefs-are-hypotheses

June 16, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – So Far

The-Best-Videos-Forggggggg

Another day, another mid-year annual “Best” list (you can find all 1,600 Best lists here).

You might also be interested in:
The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators ; The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More ; The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More! ;  The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More ; The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” and The Best Videos For Teaching & Learning About Figurative Language.

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Showing Good & Bad Classroom Discussions

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos About The Importance Of Practice – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos Explaining Gravitational Waves (In An Accessible Way)

I’ve also written a guest post for Edutopia titled 5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Videos for ELL Classrooms. You might find it useful.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – So Far (some may have been produced prior to this year, but are just new to me):

“Pro Tips: How to Study” does not allow embedding, but it’s a good one.  I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Helping Students Learn How Best To Study.

I think this video is a great one to show to students — it’s short and sweet, and could really help with student presentations. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Making Good Presentations:

I’ve previously posted about Jo Boaler’s work (see Great New Video: “When People Make Mistakes Their Brains Grow, More Than When They Got Work Right”). Her TEDx Talk was recently posted. It’s titled “How you can be good at math, and other surprising facts about learning” and it’s definitely not just applicable to math. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning:

And here’s her earlier animated video:

I’m adding this video to The Best Sites For Learning About Protests In History:

Mai Xi Lee has done a tremendous job working with schools in our district to implement Social Emotional Learning. In this video, you’ll hear what it looks like (and, you’ll see a few clips of me and my classroom :) ):

I’m adding it to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

Police Body Cameras: What Do You See? is a new very impressive interactive at The New York Times. After first soliciting the reader’s general feelings about the police, the interactive shows several staged police encounters from different cameras and angles – asking you to judge what you think you saw. Then, those judgments are compared to other what others said and their feelings about the police. It’s extraordinarily useful to just about any class, and will be a superior addition to my Theory of Knowledge lesson on perception, Videos: Here’s The Simple Theory of Knowledge Lesson On Perception I Did Today. That post shares several other videos showing the same event from different angles.

I’m adding this video to The Best Sites That Show Statistics By Reducing The World & The U.S. To 100 People, which I’ve just updated and revised. The video is from GOOD:

Human appears to be a full-length movie and a YouTube channel with short personal stories from around the world. Here is how they describe it:

Filmmaker and artist Yann Arthus-Bertrand spent 3 years collecting real-life stories from more than 2,000 women and men in 60 countries. Working with a dedicated team of translators, journalists and cameramen, he captures deeply personal and emotional accounts of topics that unite us all; struggles with poverty, war, homophobia, and the future of our planet mixed with moments of love and happiness.

Here’s one amazing example (that was made into a TED-ED lesson):

I’m adding Human to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

Fig. 1 by University of California is a YouTube Channel offering short, accessible science animations with closed-captioning.

Here are some samples:

I’ve previously posted about an intriguing study on curiosity (see “Curiosity improves memory by tapping into the brain’s reward system”). Now, this video has just come online that provides a short explanation of the same study.

I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Curiosity.

The Sacramento Bee asked me to give ninety-seconds of tips for new teachers. Here’s the video:

I’m adding it to The Best Advice For New Teachers.

I’ve previously posted a lot about the work of Harvard professor Michael Sandel.

Here’s an older video clip
of an interview he did on NBC. I use it in my IB Theory of Knowledge class when we’re studying Ethics.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

I’m always trying to learn new classroom discussion strategies, particularly using the sequence of big-to-small-to-big (pose question,assignment and sequence to the entire class; have them break into small groups; then come back to the entire class to share and discuss). This kind of strategy works great for English Language Learners and, I think, for just about everybody else, too. So I was excited to see this short video on The Teaching Channel (embedded below and here’s the direct link to it at The Channel).

I hadn’t heard of the “Wingman” strategy before (call me “PC,” but I’d probably call it “Wingperson.” Basically, students go into small groups (for example, a group of three) and one person is designated as the “Wingman.” That person’s job is to listen to the discussion between the classmates in the group and use a sheet to evaluate the quality of the work (for example, if they are using certain sentence starters or if they are talking excessively) and then to write down their own thoughts and summarize what occurred. Then, that student can provide a report to the class. There are lots of variations, of course. If you register at the Teaching Channel (it’s free and easy), you then gain access to some nice materials, including a sample Wingman worksheet.

I like it a lot. I’m adding it to The Best Resources Sharing The Best Practices For Fruitful Classroom Discussions.

Here’s the video:

Brainwaves has issued another great video — this time a short interview of Jonathan Kozol. Actually, there are two. The first is five minutes, and the second is one minute of him talking about the great Fred Rogers. As a bonus, I’ve also included an NPR video of him from last year. Here’s an excerpt from the new video, followed by all the videos themselves:

After-all-these-years

I, and many others, always look forward to the infrequent release of an RSA Animated talk. They are visualizations of talks given by authors/writers/scientists on important topics. You can see all of them at their YouTube Channel. Their video of Dan Pink might be the one most familiar to educators. They recently released on of a talk by Carol Dweck, and it’s pretty impressive. It’s embedded below, and I’m also adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A Growth Mindset.

I’ve previously posted some comments and videos of writer George Saunders (see Animated Video: George Saunders’ Commencement Speech On “The Importance of Kindness” and Video: “George Saunders Commencement Speech 2013″). The Atlantic has published a quasi-animated interview with him on “how to tell a good story.” I’m embedding it below. However, be aware that the Atlantic video platform can be a bit cantankerous. It’s really worth viewing. Because of some very slightly off-color language, I probably wouldn’t recommend using it below the high school level.

Because of some comments he makes in it, including the one highlighted below, I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Getting Student Writers To “Buy-Into” Revision – Help Me Find More.

Revision-is-sort-of-an

As all of us teachers know, some students are reluctant to ask for help. I’ve collected resources on this challenge at The Best Research On Why Some Students Ask For More Or Less Help Than Others. One of the items on that list is a post I wrote about a recent study about how asking for help creates a good impression (see Quote Of The Day: “Asking Advice Makes a Good Impression” & Its Connection To The Classroom). I’ve used that study in a mini-lesson to help students see some benefits to asking for help that they might not have known. Now, New York Magazine has created a very short video illustrating the findings of that same study, which would make a great addition to the text. Here it is:

I’ve added this video to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!:

I’m adding this video to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About U.S. History (Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip):

Here are two important issues we all need to know more about:

Let me know what videos I’m missing….

September 6, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — So Far

As regular readers know, I teach an International Baccalaureate “Theory of Knowledge” class. Our school structures our IB program a bit differently from many others by having a whole lot of students take individual IB classes and we have relatively few who are taking all IB classes in order to get the IB diploma. I really like this set-up, and it opens up my TOK class to a lot more students.

As I’ve said before, I can’t think of a high school class that would be more fun to teach or more fun to take…

You might also be interested in:

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources — 2010

Here are my choices for The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — So Far:

My collection of resources for IB Theory of Knowledge classes has grown to 1200 categorized links.  TOK teachers and students might also find our class blog useful.

“much of what seems real to us is governed by our own perceptions”

The TOK Oral Presentation is a key part of all Theory Of Knowledge classes, and Jeff Taylor, who I assume is a TOK teacher, has created an amazingly helpful Prezi slideshow on TOK Presentation Tips.  I’ve embedded it over at our Theory of Knowledge class blog.

‘What Money Can’t Buy’ and What it Shouldn’t Buy is a terrific interview of Harvard professor Michael Sandel about his new book, “What Money Can’t Buy.” It appeared on the PBS News Hour tonight (Part Two will be online tomorrow and I’ll post it here). I’ve embedded the video below, though I don’t know if it will show up in an RSS feed. If you go to the previous link you can also read the transcript. I’ve previously written about Professor Sandel’s new book and what he has to say about schools. I also use his work when we study ethics in our IB Theory Of knowledge class.

Watch ‘What Money Can’t Buy’ and What it Shouldn’t Buy on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

The Stories We Think We See Are Not Always The Real Ones

“Let’s Play ‘History As A List’” Is A Fascinating Idea

Teaching Students To Teach (& What School Reformers Are Missing)

“Facial Coding For Super Bowl Ads”

NPR’s Robert Krulwich Provides Another Excellent Idea For A History Lesson

Creating An Internet Meme With Makr.io

Thinking “Inside Out” — How Could I Use This In A Lesson?

The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons

Good Video Series On Critical Thinking

VERY Useful Analysis Of Bill Nye’s Video On Creationism

“Teenage Philosopher Defends Missing Her Curfew” is a must-read, very funny piece from McSweeney’s Magazine. It is perfect for an IB Theory of Knowledge class! I’m going to have students read it, and then work in pairs to find the meaning of each philosophical allusion in the article. It will be a fun activity near the end of the school year, and I’ll probably even make it a contest (I’m obviously not a fan of extrinsic rewards, but, in this case, I’ll make a very silly one).

I titled the post where I published this comic “There Are Dangers To Always Doing What You’re Told To Do….”:

Source: gocomics.com

Additional contributions are welcome!

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the 900 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

August 20, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — So Far

As I’ve mentioned previously, I’m doing mid-year lists to make it easier for me to do my end-of-year final lists.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — So Far:

Here’s a short video demonstrating Bloom’s Taxonomy through scenes from the movie, “Finding Nemo.” It only has still scenes for each level with a description, but it would be easy enough to show the scenes from a DVD or via Netflix and use this video as a guide:

And here’s Bloom’s Taxonomy (Revised) According to Homer Simpson. I’ve embedded the video below, though if it doesn’t show up on an RSS Readers you might have to click through to see it. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom, where it joins similar videos using clips from Star Wars, Seinfield and Pirates of the Caribbean to provide a similar light-hearted, but educational, perspective.I’ve written a lot about the work of Harvard Professor Michael Sandel. Here’s short video where he’s considering the question “Should we pay children to read?” He gets to the crux of the matter in the final couple of minutes:

I titled this video “Sometimes You Just Have To Take The Risk, Jump In, & Grab An Opportunity Because It May Not Be There For Long…”:

First, congratulations to LeBron James on his first NBA Championship.

Second, thanks to LeBron for spending so much reading and making it so public.

Here’s a video on why and what he’s reading, and an ESPN article about it — LeBron James, open book.

Justin Reich posted Don’t Use Khan Academy without Watching this First, and it’s a very important post where he shared this video two teachers (and an important commentary about it), Dave Coffey and John Golden, created:

Bill Ferriter found this video and wrote a must-read commentary about it — Learning about Grading from the Baljeatles.

Let’s not turn our students into this, please. This video make a great case for why we need to help our students develop intrinsic motivation.

This really is an extraordinary video, and is tailor-made to use in an ESL class — it’s extremely engaging and has lots of different activities that students can describe and discuss. In fact, it’s engaging for anyone…. Unfortunately, it’s also a commercial for Coke, but the advertising part is very small at the end:

PBS released this wonderful remix of Mister Rogers:

Thanks to an excellent post by Jennifer Brokofsky, I learned about this short video of Sir Ken Robinson. He makes an excellent point about the importance of helping students motivate themselves (and I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students):

“Farmers and gardeners know you cannot make a plant grow….The plant grows itself. What you do is provide the conditions for growth. And great farmers know what the conditions are and bad ones don’t. Great teachers know what the conditions for growth are and bad ones don’t.”

In this video, some ducklings were able to get over the curb on their own. However, several found that it was just too high. Look at how someone provides assistance to those having trouble, and how he doesn’t tell them what to do. Instead, he offers it as an option, as a choice they can make. It’s an example of an old community organizing axiom, “If you don’t give people the opportunity to say no, you don’t give them the opportunity to say yes, either.”

Diane Ravitch calls this video clip the “greatest single commentary on flaws of data-driven school reform today.” It is pretty darn good, I have to agree:

Perpetual Ocean is a NASA video showing ocean currents over a two year period. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Oceans.

Check-out the just-released Symphony of Science video about dinosaurs. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Dinosaurs:

This is a very good short video on how our brain learns. It also reinforces the importance of deliberative practice. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning:

This is a hilarious video using the often-used Hitler video clip to comment on school testing. I’m adding it to A Collection Of The Best “Laugh While You Cry” Videos. Thanks to Bill Ferriter for finding it.

We Are All Connected is a great one minute film from The World Wildlife Fund.

You could have English Language Learners say/write what is happening in the film, compare the two screens, and explain how they are similar.

Donalyn Miller, The Book Whisperer, shared this video from Kathy Collins of Choice Literacy:

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 900 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

June 11, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“‘What Money Can’t Buy’ and What it Shouldn’t Buy”

‘What Money Can’t Buy’ and What it Shouldn’t Buy is a terrific interview of Harvard professor Michael Sandel about his new book, “What Money Can’t Buy.”

It appeared on the PBS News Hour tonight (Part Two will be online tomorrow and I’ll post it here). I’ve embedded the video below, though I don’t know if it will show up in an RSS feed. If you go to the previous link you can also read the transcript.

I’ve previously written about Professor Sandel’s new book and what he has to say about schools. I also use his work when we study ethics in our IB Theory Of knowledge class.

Watch ‘What Money Can’t Buy’ and What it Shouldn’t Buy on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

May 23, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Great Example Demonstrating The Pitfalls Of Extrinsic Rewards

Regular readers of this blog are well aware of my concerns about using extrinsic rewards.

Here’s another great example of why they can be so damaging…

Michael Sandel has recently written a book about the values of the market invading all aspects of our lives (see “What Isn’t for Sale?”). I have it on my nightstand, but haven’t gotten to it yet.

The Boston Globe published a short excerpt
today — it’s worth reading the whole post. Here’s the excerpt:

For years, Switzerland had been trying to find a place to store its radioactive waste…. One location designated as a potential site was the small mountain village of Wolfenschiessen (population 2,100). In 1993, shortly before a referendum on the issue, economists surveyed the residents of the village, asking whether they would vote to accept a nuclear waste repository in their community if the Swiss parliament decided to build it there. Although the facility was widely viewed as an undesirable addition to the neighborhood, a slim majority (51 percent) of residents said they would accept it. Apparently their sense of civic duty outweighed their concern about the risks. Then the economists added a sweetener: suppose parliament proposed building the nuclear waste facility in your community and offered to compensate each resident with an annual monetary payment. Then would you favor it?

The result: support dropped to 25 percent. What’s more, upping the ante didn’t help. When the economists increased the monetary offer, the result was unchanged. The residents stood firm even when offered yearly cash payments as high as $8,700 per person, well in excess of the median monthly income.

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