Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

June 24, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Two Ongoing Discussions On This Blog: Sugata Mitra & Ruby Payne

Readers might be interested in revisiting two of my previous posts that have ongoing lively discussions in their comment sections:

A Response To Questions About Sugata Mitra is a guest post written by Rory Gallagher, which was written after I raised questions about Mitra’s approach to education. Professor Mitra is participating in that discussion in the comments section.

There are now 67 — yup, count ’em, 67 — comments at my post, The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne.

Join in either or both!

January 24, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
176 Comments

The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne

Ruby Payne is a popular consultant to school districts around the United States and, perhaps, the world. I have major concerns about her “deficit” view of low-income students and their families — it smacks of a “blaming the victim” mentality.

I’ve written extensively about the concept of “blame,” and you might be interested in The Best Resources For Helping Students (& The Rest Of Us) Learn The Concept Of Not Blaming Others.

I thought it might also be important, though, to create a “The Best…” list specifically related to Ms. Payne. Her popularity is a fact (you can read this fawning New York Times Magazine article about her to confirm that statement).

There have been some good critiques written about her, though there have also been ones that are not particularly accessible and written in “academic-ese” and others which I think have been overly ideological. Here’s a comment I left on Scott McLeod’s blog a few years ago during a conversation about Payne:

I agree that the most effective long-term strategy for dealing with many of the problems facing low-income communities (and the children who live in them) is to organize for better housing, employment, health, etc.). I would also add that schools and their staff should work as partners with parents and other local neighborhood institutions to push for those changes.

At the same time, though, I don’t necessarily believe that this kind of strategy is the only avenue to pursue, just as I don’t believe that most teachers are attracted to Ruby Payne’s deficit model because it’s “comfortable.”

I believe that there is much that can be done day-and-day-out in the classroom by teachers. And that many of these teachers are desperate to learn any kind of instructional strategies and classroom management tactics that they can apply effectively to respond to the many challenging situations that can be found in inner-city schools.

Saul Alinsky, the father of modern-day community organizing and the founder of the organization that I worked for during my organizing career, once said, “The price of criticism is a constructive alternative.”

I believe that those of us who are critics of Ruby Payne need to do a far better job of offering constructive alternatives that teachers can use today and tomorrow — right in their classroom — if we want more to see the fallacies of Payne’s approach.

One of the things I try to do in this blog and in my books is to offer practical strategies for teachers to use instead of getting sucked into “blaming the victim.”

But there have been some good accessible critiques written, and I thought I’d share a few of what I think are the best ones:

The Myth of the Culture of Poverty by Paul Gorski at Educational Leadership.

A Framework for Understanding Ruby Payne by Anita Bohn at Rethinking Schools.

Savage Unrealities by Paul Gorski at Rethinking Schools.

Revisiting Ruby Payne by Anita Bohn at Rethinking Schools.

Poverty and Payne: Supporting Teachers to Work with Children of Poverty is by Mistilina Sato and Timothy J. Lensmir.

Shifting from Deficit to Generative Practices: Addressing Impoverished and All Students is by Paul Thomas. And thanks to Paul for helping me find some of the articles on this list.

The Corrosive Power of Stereotypes in Politics and Education is also by Paul Thomas.

Return of the Deficit is by Curt Dudley-Marling.

Questioning Payne is a good piece from Teaching Tolerance.

More resources can be found at Debunking Ruby Payne’s Framework of Poverty.

The Payne of Confronting Stereotypes about Poverty as Educators is by Paul Thomas.

Questioning Payne is from Teaching Tolerance.

Feedback and/or Additional suggestions are always welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the over 800 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

May 22, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
72 Comments

Another Good Critique Of Ruby Payne

Readers of this blog know that I”m definitely not a fan of Ruby Payne, the high-priced consultant and speaker to school districts who has a decidely “deficit” view of low-income families.

I’ve recently discovered another good critique of her perspective. It’s called Miseducating Teachers about the Poor: A Critical Analysis of Ruby Payne’s Claims about Poverty.

It’s worth a visit.

December 28, 2008
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

Ruby Payne Discussion

Alice Mercer alerted me to a lively discussion going on about educational consultant Ruby Payne over at the Dangerously Irrelevant blog.

Regular readers of this blog know that I’m pretty critical of Ms. Payne’s “deficit” approach to low-income students.

You might find it interesting to visit the conversation going on at Scott McLeod’s blog. For what it’s worth, here’s the comment I left there:

I’m coming to this conversation late (it IS Christmas break, after all!), but as a longtime critic of Ruby Payne (and an admirer of Paul Gorski for being an even earlier and far more insightful critic than me) it’s certainly an engaging one.

I’m also coming to it after a nineteen year community organizing career that has preceded my newer career (five years and counting) as a teacher in Sacramento’s largest inner-city high school.

I agree that the most effective long-term strategy for dealing with many of the problems facing low-income communities (and the children who live in them) is to organize for better housing, employment, health, etc.). I would also add that schools and their staff should work as partners with parents and other local neighborhood institutions to push for those changes.

At the same time, though, I don’t necessarily believe that this kind of strategy is the only avenue to pursue, just as I don’t believe that most teachers are attracted to Ruby Payne’s deficit model because it’s “comfortable.”

I believe that there is much that can be done day-and-day-out in the classroom by teachers. And that many of these teachers are desperate to learn any kind of instructional strategies and classroom management tactics that they can apply effectively to respond to the many challenging situations that can be found in inner-city schools.

Saul Alinsky, the father of modern-day community organizing and the founder of the organization that I worked for during my organizing career, once said, “The price of criticism is a constructive alternative.”

I believe that those of us who are critics of Ruby Payne need to do a far better job of offering constructive alternatives that teachers can use today and tomorrow — right in their classroom — if we want more to see the fallacies of Payne’s approach.

Larry Ferlazzo

June 13, 2007
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Ruby Payne

I just learned through Charles Olson’s blog about a recent laudatory New York Times Magazine article about Ruby Payne, a writer and workshop leader on education issues.  Charles has a very different take on it than I do, but I would like to thank him for pointing out the article.

I have serious concerns about Ruby Payne’s perspective on the challenges facing low-income families, one that I would characterize as “blaming the victim.”I believe that many School Districts, teachers, and, most importantly, students, are ill-served by the advice she offers.

This, I think, is a particular concern to readers of this blog since so many English Language Learners come from low-income communities.

I would encourage people to read an excellent critique of Ruby Payne’s work that recently appeared in Rethinking Schools and was written by Paul Gorski.

I, however, don’t believe I have a monopoly on the truth, so would be very interested in hearing other perspectives about her work.

May 1, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2015 – Part Two):

FIVE SIMPLE STEPS TO READING POLICY RESEARCH is from The Great Lakes Center. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

The Formative Evaluation of Teaching Performance is by Dylan Wiliam. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

New U.S. rules for standardized testing have been drafted. Here’s what they mean for kids. is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

Report: ‘College prep for all’ mandate may block some students from graduating is from Ed Source.

Want Your Kids to Get a Good Education? Support Their Teachers’ Workplace Rights is from The Nation.

Karen Lewis may play with fire, but she didn’t start it is from The Chicago Sung Times.

The Payne of Confronting Stereotypes about Poverty as Educators is by Paul Thomas. I’m adding it to The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne.

Results from the latest National Assessment of Educational Progress tests were released this week. Here are some useful reactions on them:

Proficiency and NAEP scores: Let’s stop talking about trivial distinctions and focus on ending inequality instead is from The Hechinger Report.

Reactions to 12th Grade NAEP Declines? Mostly Tempered is from Ed Week.

These tweets point out that scores might be lower or flat, but that also more students took the test. In other words, it’s not an “apples to apples” comparison to previous years.

January 16, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Resources On Race & Racism

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Here are new additions to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More:

Schools, black children, and corporal punishment is from Brookings.

The telling way white Americans react to pictures of dark-skinned immigrants is from The Washington Post.

Morning Video: Controversial Atlanta Teacher-Student Dance Video is from Alexander Russo, who then links to a very interesting post by Christopher Emdin.

‘Please-don’t-riot’ statements are the exact wrong response to the Tamir Rice news is from The Washington Post.

Here’s a lesson plan from the Anti-Defamation League: Anti-Muslim Bigotry and Being an Ally

Questioning Payne is a good piece from Teaching Tolerance. I’m adding it to The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne.

May 5, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More

'Stop Racism' photo (c) 2012, zeevveez - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

If you are coming here from my Education Week Teacher column on the importance of recruiting and retaining teachers of color, I have grouped links related to that topic near the bottom of this post.

Check out this series at my Education Week Teacher column: ‘It is Long Past Time to Meet the Needs of Students of Color’

The Value of Diversity is the topic of this topic of my NY Times interactive for ELLs.interactive for ELLs.

Issues of race and racism are critical for us to discuss and act on in our classrooms, among the teaching profession, and in society.

I’ve posted a number of useful related resources over the years, and I thought this would be a good time to bring them all together and to also invite readers to contribute more.

Here are my choices, so far, for inclusion in A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism:

All My “Best” Lists On Race, Racism & The Civil Rights Movement – In One Place

The Best Posts, Articles & Lesson Plans On The Jordan Davis Tragedy & Verdict: Our “Classrooms Are Full Of Him”

The Best Resources For Lessons On Trayvon Martin

The Best Commentaries On The 60th Anniversary Of Brown vs. Board Of Education

How Many Of Our Students Feel This Way? (Resources On The Shooting Death of Michael Brown)

The Best Resources On Ferguson For Use In The Classroom

Useful Resources For Teaching About Eric Garner’s Death

Useful Resources For Teaching About #FreddieGray

Ta-Nehisi Coates On “Elegant Racism”

Quote Of The Day: “Why Are Teachers Of Color Missing In Teacher Of The Year Selection?”

“Looting” In Haiti?

I’ve used these two videos in class:

3 Pitfalls To Avoid When Talking About Race is from NPR.

Why students need more Black and Latino teachers is by José Luis Vilson.

US teachers nowhere as diverse as their students is from The Associated Press.

America’s real racism problem doesn’t look like Donald Sterling is from Vox.

Text to Text | ‘Huckleberry Finn’ and ‘In Defense of a Loaded Word’ is from The New York Times Learning Network.

Race Still Matters: Why class-based affirmative action won’t heal our racial disparities is from Slate.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: How To Tell If You’re a Racist Like Donald Sterling is from TIME.

Paul Thomas has posted some good Toni Morrison videos on her blog.

Racism 101: Let’s Talk About Diversity and Prejudice in America’s Public Schools
is from The Pacific Standard.

The 9 Most Influential Works of Scientific Racism, Ranked is from io9.

The Ultimate, Crystal-Clear Guide to What Racism Is is from GoKicker.

What-Im-talking-about-is

You may have already heard about, or read, Ta-Nehisi Coates’ article in The Atlantic titled “The Case for Reparations.”

It’s an amazing article, and Bill Moyers just aired an interview with him about it, which I’ve embedded below:

In addition, Moyers posted These Eight Charts Show Why Racial Equality Is a Myth in America on his site.

You might also find The New Republic’s piece, Get Ready for a National Debate About Slavery Reparations, useful.

Also, this: How To Tell Who Hasn’t Read The New ‘Atlantic’ Cover Story, from NPR.

Slavery reparations are workable and affordable is from Vox.

Eric Holder wants to talk about ‘subtle’ discrimination. This is what he means. is from The Washington Post.

Does It Matter if Schools Are Racially Integrated? is from NPR.

You can be a beneficiary of racism even if you’re not a racist is from Vox.

Six times victims have received reparations — including four in the US is from Vox.

Why white folks shouldn’t fear reparations is from The Week.

For Black Kids in America, a Degree Is No Guarantee is from The Atlantic.

Over at Vox, Ezra Klein interviews Ta-Nehisi Coates about his article, “The Case for Reparations.”

I’ve embedded the video below, but Vox has a nice interactive table of contents that might make it more useful — especially if you don’t have an hour to watch the whole thing.

 

White People Think One Black Person’s Success Proves Racism Is Over is from The Huffington Post.

What Is Your Race? For Millions Of Americans, A Shifting Answer is from NPR.

Are Reparations Due to African-Americans? is from The New York Times.

Q&A: Ta-Nehisi Coates on Reparations, Ignorant Journalism, and Whether He Talks to President Obama appeared in The New Republic.

If Affirmative Action Is Doomed, What’s Next? is from The New York Times. Here’s a commentary on that piece:

 

In Landmark Decision, U.S. Patent Office Cancels Trademark For Redskins Football Team is from Think Progress.

Here’s a related video:

Advocacy in the Age of Colorblindness is by Stephanie Rivera.

How Race-Studies Scholars Can Respond to Their Haters


How Racism Invented Race in America
is from The Atlantic.

Dress Codes For Success is from Latino USA.

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers is from The Washington Post.

Why we still need affirmative action for African Americans in college admissions is from The Washington Post.

The Major Disadvantage Facing Black Students, Even In Kindergarten is from The Huffington Post.

Everyone does drugs, but only minorities are punished for it is from Vox.

Most Americans Think Racial Discrimination Doesn’t Matter Much Anymore is from Mother Jones.

Here’s some good advice for those of us who are not members of an ethnic minority:

 

A basic flaw in the argument against affirmative action is from The Washington Post.

The Rise of Respectability Politics is from Dissent.

Why I don’t hyphenate Chinese American is from TIME.

The Black and Smart blog is a must-read.

Student: My school district hires too many white teachers is from The Washington Post.

Pulitzer-prize winning author Junot Díaz on the power of culture.

The Return of School Segregation in Eight Charts is from PBS.

15 Charts That Prove We’re Far From Post-Racial is from The Huffington Post.

10 Quotes That Perfectly Explain Racism To People Who Claim They’re Colorblind is from The Atlanta Black Star.

NEA Report: Lack of Teacher Diversity Jeopardizes Student Achievement is from NEA Today.

My son has been suspended five times. He’s 3. is from The Washington Post.

On the Importance of Mirrors for Students (and Teachers) appeared in The Huffington Post.

White People Are Fine With Laws That Harm Blacks is from Slate.

Telling white people the criminal justice system is racist makes them like it more is from Vox.

White people are winning the war on whites is from The Washington Post.

War Against Whites? I Think Not is by Charles M. Blow in The NY Times.

How Boston Public Schools Can Recruit and Retain Black Male Teachers is from The Shanker Blog.

What ‘War On Whites’? is from The Washington Post.

How Many Of Our Students Feel This Way? (Resources On The Shooting Death of Michael Brown)

Poverty and Race in America, Then and Now is a very useful interactive.

“Please Don’t Ask Me That Question Again!” is from Black & Smart.

Why Educators Need to Step Up and Address Racial Injustice is by Melinda Anderson.

The racism of the US criminal justice system in 10 charts is from Vox.

America’s Racial Divide, Charted is from The New York Times.

Ferguson, Watts and a Dream Deferred is also from The New York Times.

The black-white gap in life expectancy is narrowing — but it’s still too wide is from Vox.

Gordon Parks’ 1950s Photo Essay On Civil Rights-Era America Is As Relevant As Ever is from The Huffington Post.

Three quarters of whites don’t have any non-white friends is from The Washington Post.

For first time, minority students expected to be majority in U.S. public schools this fall is from The Washington Post.

Is Everyone a Little Bit Racist? is by Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times.

Navajo Kindergartener Told to Cut his Hair, Sent Home on First Day of School is from Color Lines.

 

 

 

 

Teachers, T-Shirts & The Messages That They Send

When Whites Just Don’t Get It, Part 2 is by Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times.

White People’s Obsession with Reverse Racism Three quarters of whites don’t have any non-white friends is from The Washington Post.

Mapping the counties where public-school children still remain segregated is from The Washington Post.

Here’s an important video:

And here’s some additional information related to the video.

The New Racism is from Slate.

Negrophobia: Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and America’s Fear of Black People is from TIME.

What The Economist should have read before suggesting that US slavery wasn’t always so bad

Racial Profiling Curriculum, Resources & Know Your Rights is from the NAACP. I’m using some of their resources here in my IB Theory of Knowledge class when we examine racial profiling.

Study finds range of skills students taught in school linked to race and class size is from Eureka Alert.

You really can get pulled over for driving while black, federal statistics show is from The Washington Post.

America’s Unspoken Education Issue: Black Kids Need Black Teachers is by Melinda Anderson.

Florida Man Is Convicted of Murdering Teenager in Dispute Over Loud Music is from The New York Times. I’m also adding this to The Best Posts, Articles & Lesson Plans On The Jordan Davis Tragedy & Verdict: Our “Classrooms Are Full Of Him.”

Teaching In Black and White is a great issue of Rethinking Schools.

Racial Disparity in Imprisonment Inspires White People to Be Even More Tough on Crime is from The Pacific Standard.


Can This Grassroots Movement Change the Way Teachers Think About Race?
is from Take Part.

New Federal Guidelines Aim to Rid Schools of Racial Inequality is from The New York Times.

White people are more likely to deal drugs, but black people are more likely to get arrested for it is from The Washington Post.

Race, Trust, and Split-Second Judgments is from The Pacific Standard.

Why early voting is about so much more than convenience is from The Washington Post.

How college ed programs try, fail to recruit teachers of color is from The Hechinger Report.

Why teachers must reflect student diversity is from The Seattle Globalist.

A Super-Simple, Step-by-Step Guide to Determine if Your Team Mascot Is Offensive is from The New York Times.

Why White People’s Awareness of Racism Isn’t Enough is from The Nation.

When Whites Just Don’t Get It, Part 3 is by Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times.

Overthinking It: Using Food As A Racial Metaphor is from NPR.

Whites riot over pumpkins in NH and Twitter turns it into epic lesson about Ferguson is from Raw Story.

Don’t tell young black males that they are ‘endangered’ is from The Washington Post.

Whites think discrimination against whites is a bigger problem than bias against blacks is from The Washington Post.

This is what the legacy of ‘white privilege’ looks like in Bill O’Reilly’s hometown is from The Washington Post.

 

Why We Have So Many Terms For ‘People Of Color’ is from NPR.

Panic, Shame, and Cuffs: An Account From an Arrested Black Teacher is from Education Week.

The Economic Impact of School Suspensions is from The Atlantic.

Regarding teachers of color: Boston Public Schools system is set to lead once again is from The Hechinger Report.

When whites are guilty of colorism is from The Washington Post.

“It’s symbolic annihilation of history, and it’s done for a purpose. It really enforces white supremacy”: Edward Baptist on the lies we tell about slavery is from Salon.

Millions of black students attend public schools that are highly segregated by race and by income is from The Urban Institute.

The N-Word is an impressive interactive from The Washington Post.

Eschew the Taboo: The pernicious effects of banning words. is an older piece by Christopher Hitchens.


Politics and the African-American Human Language
appeared in The Atlantic.

Who Can Use The N-Word? That’s The Wrong Question is from NPR.

 

 

Text to Text | ‘Little Things Are Big’ and ‘Students See Many Slights as Racial ‘Microaggressions’ is from The New York Times Learning Network.

What Happened in Ferguson? is a New York Times interactive.

The Gospel of Rudy Giuliani: Why is no one talking about American-on-American crime? is by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Newspaper ‘Erred’ In Publishing Cartoon Of Immigrants Crashing Thanksgiving is from Talking Points Memo.

Why whites don’t understand black segregation is from The Washington Post.

Five Charts That Show Why a Post-White America Is Already Here is from The New Republic.

High School Powder-Puff Football Team’s Blackface Photo Goes Viral is from The Root.

Can White Teachers Be Taught How to Teach Our Children? is by Melinda D. Anderson.

By shifting focus, Whiteness Project aims for deeper discussion of race in America is from Current.

Dear White People: Mayor Betsy Hodges is Not in a Gang is from The Minneapolis Star Tribune.

TV station accuses mayor of ‘flashing a known gang sign,’ sparks ‘#pointergate’ is from Poynter.

When Whites Just Don’t Get It, Part 4 is by Nicholas Kristof.

A Majority of Middle-Class Black Children Will Be Poorer as Adults is from The Pacific Standard.

Giuliani should remember America is a very different place for whites and blacks is from The Washington Post.

Very Interesting Feature At USA Today On School Diversity

A Brief History Of Racial Protest In Sports is from NPR.

When Educators Understand Race and Racism is by Melinda D. Anderson.

The Worth of Black Men, From Slavery to Ferguson is from The New York Times.

The National Education Association’s statement On grand jury’s decision to decline to indict police officer who killed Eric Garner.

Taking the Color Blinders Off is by Valeria Brown.

We Need Teachers of Color is from Education Week.

The White Conversation on Race is from Color Lines.

Montgomery County launches teacher diversity initiative in schools is from The Washington Post.

Teachers undo personal biases to help students of color engage is from Colorado Public Radio.

The Difficult Conversations on Race is by Leo Casey.

Schools’ Discipline for Girls Differs by Race and Hue is from The New York Times.

Why White High School Drop Outs Have More Wealth Than Black College Graduates is from Demos.

The Wealth Gap Between Whites And Minorities Is Growing
is from Five Thirty Eight.

How to Improve Discussion of Race in the Classroom is from The Chronicle Of Higher Education.

Where have all the black and brown teachers gone? is from The Hechinger Report.

The Perfect Response For Kids With ‘Hard-To-Pronounce Ethnic’ Names is from Upworthy.

New book cites slavery as cause for US wealth is a video from MSNBC.

Our Teacher Diversity Problem Is Not Just About Recruitment. It’s About Retention. is from Slate.

White Kids Will Be Kids is from The Pacific Standard.

Rich countries and the minorities they discriminate against, mapped is from Quartz.

The Birth of a New Civil Rights Movement is from Politico and is very good.

How ‘Selma’ Diminishes Dr. King is also from Politico.

Segregation Now is from ProPublica.

‘Selma’ Ignores the Radical Grassroots Politics of the Civil Rights Movement is from The New Republic.

A Brutal Loss, but an Enduring Conviction is from ProPublica.

Why I Am Optimistic About the Future of Race Relations in America is by Jamelle Bouie at Slate.

Racial Bias, Even When We Have Good Intentions is from The New York Times.

Chris Rock is right: White Americans are a lot less racist than they used to be. is from The Washington Post.

School districts respond to growing fury over police shootings, black male achievement gap is from The Hechinger Report.

Teach About Mike Brown. But Don’t Stop There. is from Rethinking Schools.

The Misremembering of ‘I Have a Dream’ is from The Nation.

A Revolution of Values: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Poor People’s Campaign is from Bill Moyers.

Maureen Dowd’s clueless white gaze: What’s really behind the “Selma” backlash is from Salon.

Black teens who commit a few crimes go to jail as often as white teens who commit dozens is from The Washington Post.

On Racism and White Privilege is from Teaching Tolerance.

The sources of wealth is a Washington Post interactive.

A People’s History of Muslims in the United States is from The Zinn Education Project.

Approaching Racial and Cultural Sensitivity is from Edutopia.

Why so many Americans still deny racism exists when the evidence is everywhere is from Vox.

The Secret History of South Asian & African American Solidarity is from NBC News.

Letter from a Region in My Mind is by James Baldwin.

America’s yawning racial wealth gap, explained in 9 charts is from Vox.

Why mentors need to stop trying to fix black and brown students is by Andre Perry.

Middle-age blacks have less in their 401(k)s than young whites is from The Washington Post.

This may be the way to eliminate the biases white students don’t even know they have​ is from The Washington Post.

Race and Overreaction: On the Streets and in Schools is from The Atlantic.

School = Jail: Sending the Wrong Message to Black Students is by Renee Moore.

Starbucks Wants To Talk To You About Race.But Does It Want to Talk To You About Racism? is from Medium.

Education Is Not Great Equalizer for Black Americans is from NBC News.

White Privilege, Quantified is from The Atlantic.

How white parents should talk to their young kids about race. is from Slate.

5 ways that blacks and whites are still not equals, 50 years after Selma is from The Washington Post.

“Acting white”: The most insidious myth about black kids and achievement is from Vox.

Diversity Explosion: The cultural generation gap mapped is an interactive from The Brookings Institution.

4 charts that show how race makes a difference in the lives of working families is from Vox.

The Economist’s chili pepper cover gets Hispanic Americans all wrong is from Vox.

No, DeAndre. It’s Not Your Imagination: What the DOJ Report Tells Us about Implicit Bias and Validation is by Zaretta Hammond.

Why are white people expats when the rest of us are immigrants? is from The Guardian.

What Is Your American Flag? is by Monita Bell.

3 Tips to Make Any Lesson More Culturally Responsive (and it’s not what you think!) is by Zaretta Hammond.

Starbucks’ critics are making a big mistake is by Van Jones.

What does justice sound like? A personal civil rights playlist is from Fusion.

What Selma Got Right appeared in Medium.

Why racism is not backed by science is from The Guardian.

Study: lighter-skinned black and Hispanic people look smarter to white people is from Vox.

The education-reform movement is too white to do any good is by Andre Perry.

Text to Text | ‘What Would Malcolm X Think?’ and ‘After the Bombing’ is from The New York Times Learning Network.

This chart explains why black people fear being killed by the police is from Vox.

Native American Actors Walk Off Set of Adam Sandler Movie Over Racist Jokes is from NBC News.

Teachers more likely to label black students as troublemakers, Stanford research shows is from Stanford.

Students’ Race Affects How Teachers Judge Misbehavior, Study Says is from Ed Week.

This insanely detailed map proves race is a social construct is from Vox.

This is what made researchers call a paper on race and the death penalty “#BlackLivesDon’tMatter” is from Vox.

Quote Of The Day: “Nonviolence As Compliance”

Video: “First Lady Michelle Obama Commencement Speech”

Our Biased Brains is by Nicholas Kristoff at The NY Times.

Read This: “Teachers More Likely to Label Black Students as Troublemakers” is by Renee Moore.

A Teacher’s Role in Fighting Racism is from Education Week.

Uncomfortable Conversations: Talking About Race In The Classroom is from NPR.

How Western media would cover Baltimore if it happened elsewhere is from The Washington Post.

A Talk To Teachers is by James Baldwin.

The most racist places in America, according to Google is from The Washington Post.

Dear White Teacher… is from Rethinking Schools.

In 10 Years, America’s Classrooms Are Going To Be Much More Diverse Than They Are Now is from The Huffington Post.

Racism and Discrimination Kill—Literally is from The Pacific Standard.

The only good news about the McKinney pool party is the white kids’ response to racism is from Vox.

Educate to Liberate: Build an Anti-Racist Classroom is from Edutopia.

The Flexibility of Racial Bias is from Scientific American.

Is It An ‘Uprising’ Or A ‘Riot’? Depends On Who’s Watching is from NPR.

Teaching While White is from Teaching Tolerance.

The #BlackLivesMatter Movement: Marches And Tweets For Healing is from NPR.

40 Reasons Why Our Jails Are Full of Black and Poor People is from The Huffington Post.

Statistic Of The Day: Half Of Whites See No Racism

Here are some useful stories on the Rachel Dolezal controversy:

Why Rachel Dolezal Needed To Construct Her Own Black Narrative is from BuzzFeed.

And, of course, Jon Stewart:

To understand race in the U.S. today, it’s Kalief Browder’s story, not Rachel Dolezal’s, that really matters. is by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Some #CharlestonSyllabus Highlights

Sources For Updated News On Charleston Shooting

How Educators Can Respond to Charleston is from Bright.

Attitudes Toward Racism And Inequality Are Shifting is from Five Thirty Eight.

Confronting Racial Injustice in Schools is from Ed Week.


via John Holland

The Dylann Roofs I Have Known is by Liz Prather at the Center For Teaching Quality.

StoryCorps unveiled a new animated video.

Here’s how they describe it:

Alex Landau, an African American man, was raised by his adoptive white parents to believe that skin color didn’t matter. But when Alex was pulled over by Denver police officers one night in 2009, he lost his belief in a color-blind world—and nearly lost his life. Alex tells his mother, Patsy Hathaway, what happened that night and how it affects him to this day.

Are Americans More Pessimistic About Race—or More Realistic? is from The Atlantic.

White People 101 is also from The Atlantic.

Half of Black, Latina Scientists Mistaken For Janitors, Assistants is from NBC News.

White Educators: Do You Recognize State Trooper Encinia? is from The Synapse.

Why “All Lives Matter” instead of “Black Lives Matter” is such a stupid thing to say is from Boing Boing.

Americans say racism is a bigger problem today than at any point in the past 20 years is from The Washington Post.

So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What? is from NPR.

When Schools Are Forced to Practice Race-Based Discipline is from The Atlantic.

What Is Privilege? is from BuzzFeed.

10 Ways Well-Meaning White Teachers Bring Racism Into Our Schools is from Everyday Feminism.

What Happens When Minority Kids Are Taught Not to Talk About Race is from Slate.

Statistic Of The Day: Discrimination In Adolescence Results In Bad Health As An Adult

Color-Blindness Is Counterproductive is from The Atlantic.

Handcuffed for Making Clock, Ahmed Mohamed, 14, Wins Time With Obama is from The New York Times.

‘Racial Mismatch’ Changes Teacher Expectations for Students, Study Finds is from Ed Week.

Quote Of The Day: More Students Of Color Equals Less Funding For Their Schools

Quote & Video Of The Day: Junot Díaz On Seth Meyers’ Show

Black Workers Really Do Need to Be Twice as Good is from The Atlantic.

Racial inequality even affects how long we wait for the doctor is from The Washington Post.

This powerful video shows how racism manifests in America today is from Vox.

Video & Articles About South Carolina Policeman Violently Arresting Student – Awful!

Travis Bristol “talks about the role of gender in the classroom and the ways to engage boys in the school environment.” You can read his contributions to my Ed Week column at The Teachers of Color ‘Disappearance Crisis’ and Strategies for Recruiting Teachers of Color :

The Racial Inequality of Sleep is from The Atlantic.

Here’s a new video from The New York Times. If you go to the Times itself, you’ll also find links to previous videos in their series on race, many of which are already on my Best list:

Teacher Biases Differ for Low- and High-Achieving Minority Students is from Ed Week.

Asian-American Students Launch ‘Open Hands, Open Minds’ to Celebrate Identity is from NBC News.

The Objectification of Muslims in America is from The Atlantic.

The Future of Native American Imagery in Sports is from The Atlantic.

The next time someone blames Islam for ISIS, show them this is from The Washington Post.

Racism is so deeply embedded in our psyche is from CNN.

Anti-Muslim Is Anti-American is from The New York Times.

Are you guilty of these 12 microaggressions? is from Mashable.

Quote Of The Day: Attorney Journal Loretta Lynch On Anti-Muslim Bullying In Schools

Growing Up in a Time of Fear: Confronting Stereotypes About Muslims and Countering Xenophobia is from The New York Times Learning Network.

When History Repeats: What Leaders Can Learn from Anti-Asian Laws in U.S. History is from NBC News.

How should schools respond to anti-Muslim actions against students? is from The Washington Post.

Why white people see black boys like Tamir Rice as older, bigger and guiltier than they really are is from The Washington Post.

Race In America: Your Stories is from The New York Times.

Understanding Implicit Bias: What Educators Should Know is from the AFT.

‘Racial Mismatch’ May Affect Which Students Are in Class is from Ed Week.

Schools, black children, and corporal punishment is from Brookings.

The telling way white Americans react to pictures of dark-skinned immigrants is from The Washington Post.

Morning Video: Controversial Atlanta Teacher-Student Dance Video is from Alexander Russo, who then links to a very interesting post by Christopher Emdin.

‘Please-don’t-riot’ statements are the exact wrong response to the Tamir Rice news is from The Washington Post.

Here’s a lesson plan from the Anti-Defamation League: Anti-Muslim Bigotry and Being an Ally

Questioning Payne is a good piece from Teaching Tolerance. I’m adding it to The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne.

Video & Transcript Of President Obama’s Speech At Mosque

This is what white privilege is is from The Washington Post.

An Unknown Latino Tuskegee Airman Has Been Discovered is from The Atlantic.

Creating Reparations: How Might We Nurture the Unreasonable Imagination?
is from My Year of Teaching Dangerously.

Resources for Teaching Black History Month and Black History Year Round! is from Boston Public Schools. I’m also adding this to The Best Websites To Teach & Learn About African-American History.

Unpublished Black History is from The New York Times. I’m also adding it to the same list.

Civil Rights: Then and Now is from PBS. That goes to the history list, too.

The history behind Black History Month is from Vox.

3 Ways White Kids Benefit Most From Racially Diverse Schools is from Mother Jones.

This 17-year-old is a rising voice in Baltimore’s Black Lives Matter movement is from The Washington Post.

Principals Share Advice on Addressing Racial Bias in Schools is from Education Week.

Teacher perceptions and race is from The Brookings Institution.

The Best MuckReads on America’s Troubled History With Race is from ProPublica.

This photo of Obama and a little visitor at a Black History Month celebration is remarkable is from The Washington Post.

The Black History of Housing in America: How the Dream Was Deferred is from Home Matters.

For Preservice Teachers, Lessons on Cultural Sensitivity is from Ed Week.

Threats, harassment, vandalism at mosques reach record high is from CNN.

The television series “Black-ish” had a powerful episode on police brutality and racism.

Here’s one clip (you can read a short analysis of it at Vox).

Unfortunately, it doesn’t appear to work on Chrome, but was fine on Firefox.

Black History Isn’t Just About February is from Ed Week.

Poor white kids are less likely to go to prison than rich black kids is from The Washington Post.

The Untold Stories Of Black Girls is from NPR.

Nixon official: real reason for the drug war was to criminalize black people and hippies is from Vox and is connected to the first tweet below.

Depressing Statistic Of The Day: Many White Teachers Have Low Expectations Of Black Students

Statistic Of The Day: College Drop-Out Rate Of African Americans

The Lemonade Syllabus is a:

a free syllabus of hundreds of references to works that accompany and help explain Lemonade’s meaning has been created and released online.

New PBS News Hour Report: “Teaching ‘different is okay’ to combat Islamophobia in U.S. schools”

What Young Men Of Color Can Teach Us About The Achievement Gap is from NPR.

Film Club | ‘A Conversation With Asian-Americans on Race’ is from The New York Times Learning Network.

The disturbing racial bias in who we help when they need it most is from The Washington Post.

Text to Text | ‘The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian’ and ‘On the Reservation and Off, Schools See a Changing Tide’ is from The New York Times Learning Network.

Can Computer Programs Be Racist And Sexist? is from NPR.

Black and white students score far apart on a new test of technology skills is from Chalkbeat.

Today’s teens are more skeptical that racism will go away than teens in 1966 is from Vox.

Naming this era of racial contradictions is from The Boston Globe.

Funny, & I Think Effective, Video On Islamophobia: Cure It With Chewing Gum!

This initial list is just the tip of the iceberg. Please contribute your ideas for additions to this list….

Here are links specifically related to recruiting and retaining teachers of color:

Quote Of The Day: “Why Are Teachers Of Color Missing In Teacher Of The Year Selection?”

Why students need more Black and Latino teachers is by José Luis Vilson.

US teachers nowhere as diverse as their students is from The Associated Press.

Student: My school district hires too many white teachers is from The Washington Post.

Pulitzer-prize winning author Junot Díaz on the power of culture.

NEA Report: Lack of Teacher Diversity Jeopardizes Student Achievement is from NEA Today.

On the Importance of Mirrors for Students (and Teachers) appeared in The Huffington Post.

How Boston Public Schools Can Recruit and Retain Black Male Teachers is from The Shanker Blog.

America’s Unspoken Education Issue: Black Kids Need Black Teachers is by Melinda Anderson.

How college ed programs try, fail to recruit teachers of color is from The Hechinger Report.

Why teachers must reflect student diversity is from The Seattle Globalist.

Regarding teachers of color: Boston Public Schools system is set to lead once again is from The Hechinger Report.

We Need Teachers of Color is from Education Week.

Montgomery County launches teacher diversity initiative in schools is from The Washington Post.

Where have all the black and brown teachers gone? is from The Hechinger Report.

Our Teacher Diversity Problem Is Not Just About Recruitment. It’s About Retention. is from Slate.

The Woodrow Wilson Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color

America’s Leaky Pipeline for Teachers of Color is from The Center For American Progress.

Quote Of The Day: The Need For More Teachers Of Color

America’s Kids Are Getting More Diverse, but Its Teachers Aren’t is from Take Part.

The Benefits of Minority Teachers in the Classroom is from Real Clear Education (thanks to Andre Perry for the tip).

Differentiating PD for Male Teachers of Color is by Travis Bristol.

The Classroom Racial Gap Hits an All-Time High is from Governing (thanks to Alexander Russo for the tip).

Recruiting More Minority Teachers Could Do Wonders For Minority Students, Study Says is from The Huffington Post.

Why Our Classrooms Benefit From Minority Teachers is from Ed Week.

Second Statistic Of The Day: “Where Are The Teachers Of Color?”

Why we should diversify the overwhelmingly white U.S. teaching force — and how appeared in The Washington Post.

Black male teachers: There aren’t enough of them is by Travis Bristol.

Tough Tests for Teachers, With Question of Bias is from The New York Times.

What Happened After New Orleans Fired All of Its Teachers—and Why It Still Matters to Diversity in the Classroom is from Slate.

Do American Indian Students Perform Better When They Have American Indian Teachers? is from Slate.

Increasing The Diversity Of America’s Teachers is the last in a series “guest-hosted” by Travis Bristol and Terrenda White at my Ed Week column.

Report: Minority Teachers Are Quitting at Rapid Rates is from NBC News.

The number of black teachers has dropped in nine U.S. cities is from The Washington Post.

More Minority Students, Fewer Teachers of Color is from The Atlantic.

Male teachers of color take a lesson from each other is by Travis Bristol.

The Role of Teacher Diversity in Reducing Implicit Bias is from The Shanker Blog.

Keeping Black Men In Front Of The Class is an NPR interview with Travis Bristol.

Black Male Teachers a Dwindling Demographic is from Education Week.

What It’s Like To Teach While Black appeared in The Huffington Post. (thanks to Alexander Russo for the tip)

There’s One Cause in Education That Everyone Supports: America’s Teachers Need to Be More Diverse is from Slate.

Where are the male African-American teachers?

Why Is Education Leadership So White? is from Education Week.

Why so many people are worried about teacher diversity, in two charts is from The Washington Post.

The invisible tax on teachers of color is from The Washington Post.

‘Added Value’ Why Increasing the Number of Latino and Black Public School Teachers Matters is from The Latin Post.

The troubling shortage of Latino and black teachers — and what to do about it is from The Washington Post.

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