Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Month’s ASCD “Ed Leadership” Is Out — Here Are 3 Articles I Recommend

ascd2

Most months, I highly recommend two-to-four articles that appear online in ASCD’s “Educational Leadership,” one of the best ed journals that are out there. You can see my recommendations from previous months here.

The May issue on “Professional Learning: Reimagined” just came online.

Here are my recommendations:

Rethinking Classroom Observation by Emily Dolci Grimm, Trent Kaufman and Dave Doty is excellent. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers.

Research Says / Keep Professional Learning Groups Small, But Connected is by Bryan Goodwin (who always writes great stuff). I’m adding it to the same list.

Power Up! / Your 1:1 Program: Can You Answer These 10 Questions? is by Doug Johnson. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “One-To-One” Laptop/Tablet Programs.

April 2, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Our New ASCD Educational Leadership Article: “Teaching Argument Writing to ELLs”

One-of-our-guiding

My colleague Katie Hull-Sypnieski and I wrote wrote a lengthy and, if I say so myself :) , excellent article that has just been published by ASCD Educational Leadership.

It’s titled Teaching Argument Writing to ELLs, and it discusses very practical ways to teach writing to Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced English Language Learners — especially in light of the new Common Core Standards. But I think it offers helpful advice even if you’re teaching in a country not using CCSS.

I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For Helping Students Learn To Write Persuasive Essays and to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

February 5, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Three Excellent Articles From ASCD On Teacher Morale

November 3, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Month’s ASCD’s “Educational Leadership” Is Now Online — Here Are My Recommendations

Tackling Informational Text is the theme of this month’s ASCD Educational Leadership, and it’s now online.

Here are the articles there I’d particularly recommend:

One to Grow On / Invitations to Read is by Carol Ann Tomlinson. Here’s how she ends it:

its-essential-to-avoid

You Want Me to Read What?! is by Timothy Shanahan.

Points of Entry is a typically excellent piece by Nancy Frey and Douglas Fisher.

I’m adding these articles to The Most Useful Resources For Implementing Common Core.

September 4, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Issue Of ASCD Educational Leadership Is Out – Here Are Some Articles Worth Reading

ASCD has just published the September issue of their periodical, Educational Leadership. Its theme is “Resilience and Learning.”

Here are some highlights:

The Significance of Grit: A Conversation with Angela Lee Duckworth doesn’t really have anything new to people familiar with Duckworth’s work, but it does provide a good overview. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit.”

Research Says / Grit Plus Talent Equals Student Success by Bryan Goodwin and Kirsten Miller is good. I’m adding it to the same list.

Havens of Resilience by Nan Henderson is a good piece.

I also like a piece on Research on Resilience.

Art and Science of Teaching / Cognitive Verbs and the Common Core by Robert Marzano is not connected to resilience, but it’s a useful piece. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

May 3, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Good New Issue Of ASCD’s “Educational Leadership”: “The Faces Of Poverty”

ASCD has just placed their new issue of Educational Leadership online. It’s theme is “Faces Of Poverty.” Here are the articles that I think are particularly useful and are not behind a paywall:

The Widening Income Achievement Gap is by Sean Reardon (you might remember that he wrote an excellent column in The New York Times last week on a similar topic). His EL piece provides some great data tracing the gap’s history, though I think he misses some important points in his suggested solutions. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Achievement Gap”


How Poverty Affects Classroom Engagement
is by Eric Jensen. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On Student Engagement.

Research Says / Teaching Self-Regulation Has Long-Term Benefits is by Bryan Goodwin and Kirsten Miller.

Art and Science of Teaching / Targets, Objectives, Standards: How Do They Fit? is by Robert Marzano.

February 2, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

ASCD Has Just Published Some Great Articles On Nurturing Creativity & Curiosity

Creativity Now! is the theme of the February issue of ASCD Educational Leadership, and it’s a good one.

Several are behind a paywall, but here are some great ones that are freely available now:

I’m adding these next four to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity:

I especially like Assessing Creativity by Susan M. Brookhart.

Creativity on the Brink? is by Alane Starko.

Creativity Requires a Mix of Skills is by Bryan Goodwin and Kirsten Miller.

Fundamentals of Creativity is by Ronald A. Beghetto and James C. Kaufman.

I’m adding these next to articles from the same issue to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions:

The Case for Curiosity is by Susan Engel.

Asking Questions—At Four Different Levels
is by Robert Marzano.

March 27, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

Report: ASCD Conference In San Francisco — Share Yours!

I really enjoyed my time at the ASCD Conference in San Francisco today, though had to leave early to get back to play in my regular Sunday night basketball game :) The next time I attend one I plan to make arrangements to attend the whole thing — it would certainly be worth it!

The best places to get thoughtful reports on the conference are at Alice Mercer’s blog and at the posts written by David B. Cohen at the InterAct blog. David also has some nice photos there.

I’d love it if others left comments here with their reactions to the workshops and speakers. Or just leave links to what you have written on your own blogs.

I, on the other hand, hung out at the Exhibit Hall and chatted with the great people at the Eye On Education (they’re publishing my next book in April) booth and elsewhere. It was fun meeting Bill Bigelow and Jody Sokolower from Rethinking Schools, one of my longtime favorite publications. I was also able to meet Jason Buell, Dave Orphal, Bill Ferriter, Judie Haynes, Angela Maiers and Eric Sheninger (who lives near where I grew-up in Staten Island). And it was nice to see Marjorie McAneny from Jossey-Bass.

Here are a few photos:

Alice Mercer, David B. Cohen and me

This is @alicemercer getting ready for a webcast at ascd

Alice Mercer getting ready to do a webcast from the Eye on Education exhibit

Larry ferlazzo and Angela maiers at ascd

Angela Maiers and me

Janice silva from Monterrey in Mexico

I’m standing with Janice Silva, who teaches at a school in Monterrey, Mexico. Look  for an interview with her on this blog this spring.

March 26, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

I’d Love To Meet You Sunday At The ASCD Conference!

Just a reminder that I’ll be at the ASCD Conference in San Francisco this Sunday (tomorrow), and would love to meet readers of this blog!

You’ll find me at the Eye on Education booth #2423 from 11:45 AM — 2:00 PM (they’re the publishers of my new book coming out next month, Helping Students Motivate Themselves. Alice Mercer is also going to try to do a live webcast from the same place at 11:00 AM that day, and I’ll be there then, and she’ll be hoping to have other drop-in visitors speak. So come on by!

Other than that, I’ll be doing whatever Alice tells me to do, unless people have other suggestions!

March 23, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

I’d Love To Meet You At The ASCD Conference!

I’ll be at the ASCD Conference in San Francisco this Sunday, and would love to meet readers of this blog!

Unfortunately, I’ll only be there on Sunday. You’ll be able to find me at the Eye on Education booth #2423 from 11:45 AM — 2:00 PM (they’re the publishers of my new book coming out next month, Helping Students Motivate Themselves. Alice Mercer is also going to try to do a live webcast from the same place at 11:00 AM that day, so if that works well I’ll be there then, too, and she’ll be hoping to have other drop-in visitors speak.

The rest of the time that day, I’ll either be wandering aimlessly, doing what Alice tells me to do (which is what usually happens at these conferences), or going to events/workshops that any of you recommend. Feel free to leave a comment with suggestions.

You can see a list of other people who will be blogging and twittering about the conference, too, at this ASCD post

March 14, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Live” From The ASCD Conference

Angela Powell, a member of our group blog, In Practice, is blogging live from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development’s annual conference in Orlando, Florida.

ASCD produces some great stuff, and I’m sure its conference is of a similar quality.

You can got to In Practice to find-out what Angela is learning.

November 5, 2008
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Website For ASCD

The Association For Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), one of the best resources around for educators, yesterday unveiled their new website. It’s impressive.

I rated the ASCD SmartBrief daily newsletter as number-one on The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current Education Issues list.  This newsletter consistently provides thought-provoking articles from around the country.

August 18, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Thinking Like A Scientist Can Help Overcome Allure Of Appearances”

As regular readers of this blog and my books know, I’m a big believer in inductive learning (see More Info On Why Inductive Learning Is So Effective and Is This The Most Important Research Study Of The Year? Maybe).

One effective way to use inductive learning is through the use of data sets. You can see examples of these in my ASCD article, Get Organized Around Assets and in a couple of pieces I’ve written for The New York Times.

A key element of inductive learning is having students put the items or passages into categories — that’s a given.

However, a step that many teacher miss is having students provide evidence to support their decision to put something into a particular category. It can be as simple as highlighting a word or phrase, or just writing a sentence explaining a student’s reasoning.

NPR just published a piece this morning on some research that reinforces the importance of this step. The study itself is a bit convoluted so, instead of describing it here, I’m just going to suggest you go over to their site and read Thinking Like A Scientist Can Help Overcome Allure Of Appearances.

Here’s an excerpt:

The-act-of-explaining

July 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

July’s Infographics & Interactives Galore – Part One

There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.”

You can see others at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics and by searching “infographics” on this blog.

I’ll still be publishing separate posts to individually highlight especially useful infographics and interactives, but you’ll find others in this regular feature.

Here goes:

Global Land Temperatures tracks temperatures around the work since 1900, but is not your typical climate change interactive. Check it out and you’ll see what I mean.

ASCD’s Whole Child Snapshots are quite impressive. It gives you one infographic for each state identify child-related statistics.

A Disappearing Planet is a great interactive from Propublica. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For World Biodiversity Day (& Endangered Species Day).

I’m adding this next infographic to The Best Resources For Learning About Our World’s Population Of 7 Billion:

Here’s a slideshow from KQED that I’m adding to The Best Resources On Why Raising The Minimum Wage Is Important:

July 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
5 Comments

Can You Help? Looking For Stories Of People Learning Self-Control Or Grit From Challenging Circumstances

Regular readers know I’m a big believer in teaching Social Emotional Learning (see The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources) and that I also have a healthy skepticism of how it’s sometimes used (see The manipulation of Social Emotional Learning).

Readers also know that I have a particular interest in focusing on the assets students bring to the table rather than their deficits (see Get Organized Around Assets and A Lesson Highlighting Community Assets — Not Deficits).

I’m preparing a new lesson that I’m going to try-out in the fall, and student assets are going to be a key part of it. Of course, I’ll be writing more about it…

I’m looking for stories of students/adults sharing particular instances when growing-up in challenging circumstances helped them develop grit (perseverance) and/or self-control.

These could be passages from books, articles,movies, videos, stories your own students have written, etc.

Any ideas?

July 2, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Excellent (& I Mean EXCELLENT) Differentiation Infographic

carol

Carol Tomlinson participated in an @ASCD chat on Twitter yesterday, and shared a great infographic.

Here are a couple of tweets with it, followed by a few tweets I was invited to send about differentiation and ELLs.

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

June 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Favorite Posts In 2014 — So Far

'faves' photo (c) 2005, sheldonschwartz - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Every year I identify my personal favorite posts, and it’s time for my mid-year selection.

You can see my choices for each of the past seven years here.

Here are My Favorite Posts In 2014 — So Far:

Here are some of my favorite “The Best…” lists from this year (by the way, the total lists I’ve published reached 1,300 this year):

The Best Posts & Articles Highlighting Why We Need To Be Very Careful Around Ed Tech

The Best Research Demonstrating That Lectures Are Not The Best Instructional Strategy

The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners (I did a number of these “all-time” lists — you can see links to all of them within that post).

I’ve published weekly posts at The New York Times — each one including a student interactive and teaching ideas for English Language Learners.

And I’ve published two-to-three posts each week at my Education Week Teacher advice column – over this summer I’ll be putting together my annual posts bringing together links to those that share a common theme, as well as sharing a list of the most popular ones. My suspicion is that Response: ‘The Grading System We Need to Have’ and Response: Ways to Cultivate ‘Whole-Class Engagement’ will top that list.

I also began publishing a monthly post over at the British Council about teaching English Language Learners.

And I’ve had a lot of fun doing a weekly ten minute radio shown for BAM!, where I’ve been interviewing guests who have contributed responses to my Ed Week column.

I’ve written several articles for other publications over the past few months. My favorites are probably The manipulation of Social Emotional Learning, which was published at The Washington Post (my title for it was “Let Them Eat Character”) and Teaching Argument Writing to ELLs at ASCD Educational Leadership.

Here are some favorite blog posts divided by category:

Education Policy

This Is One Of The Best Pieces I’ve Read On Teacher Evaluation: “The Problem with Outcome-Oriented Evaluations”

I Am Tired Of “School Reformers” Using The Civil Rights Movement Legacy To Support Their Agenda

The Problem With Including Standardized Test Results As Part Of “Multiple Measures” For Teacher Evaluation

“The Education Department’s strange new report on teaching”

Classroom Instruction

John Lewis: “You Must Find A Way To Get In Trouble”

More TOK & ELL Student Instagram Videos

“Sentence Navigator” Is Jason Renshaw’s Gift To ESL/EFL/ELL Teachers Everywhere!

Excellent (& I Mean EXCELLENT!) Post On Asking Questions

More “What If?” History Projects — Plus, What Students Thought Of Them….

Classroom Management

Study: Gratitude Increases Self-Control

How To Turn A Negative Consequence Into A Positive Classroom Management Strategy