Search Results for: fotobabble

Rest In Peace, Fotobabble? (I Guess Not!)

Apparently, it’s back up! Fotobabble is working this morning. Shew! Glad I haven’t lost my content. It has been temporarily down often in recent months. — Leslie White (@LeslieAWhite1) January 4, 2018 Fotobabble has been a great tool over the years for students to easily provide audio narration to photos. However, it’s off-line now, and I don’t know if it’s temporary or permanent. Please leave a comment if you know the site’s status. Fear not, however, since plenty of other free tools provide similar features. You can read about many of them at The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English. (I do have to revise and update that list). My “go-to” similar app lately has been “Know Me” (see “KnowMe” Has Immediately Become The Most Useful iPhone App In My Classroom). Number two has been Shadow Puppet (see Wow! Shadow Puppet Is A Great iPhone & iPad App For English Language Learners). Any other suggestions? Share...

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A Look Back: “Using Freire & Fotobabble With English Language Learners”

Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years. You might also be interested in:  A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009   A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog I originally wrote this post in 2013: I’ve written several times about how I use critical pedagogy with English Language Learners, specifically using a Freirian model (see “Freire’s Learning Sequence” from this blog and a New York Times piece I wrote). In addition, I’ve often written about how I use the Fotobabble tool, which lets you post an image and provide a thirty second narration with it (see Student Writing & Metacognition). Well, our student teachers and I put the two together this week with our Beginning English Language Learners. Johnny Doolittle, an art teacher at our school, regularly uses his prep (free) period to help our ELLs, and this week did an art project with them. Along with creating art, our student teachers thought it would be a good time to use some Diego Rivera artwork in the context of a critical pedagogy...

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Using Freire & Fotobabble With English Language Learners

I’ve written several times about how I use critical pedagogy with English Language Learners, specifically using a Freirian model (see “Freire’s Learning Sequence” from this blog and a New York Times piece I wrote). In addition, I’ve often written about how I use the Fotobabble tool, which lets you post an image and provide a thirty second narration with it (see Student Writing & Metacognition). Well, our student teachers and I put the two together this week with our Beginning English Language Learners. Johnny Doolittle, an art teacher at our school, regularly uses his prep (free) period to help our ELLs, and this week did an art project with them. Along with creating art, our student teachers thought it would be a good time to use some Diego Rivera artwork in the context of a critical pedagogy lesson. Students followed this sequence with the art: 1. Show a picture or short video clip portraying a national or international problem, or a common challenge your students face. 2. Next, ask students to share what they believe is happening. What is the problem they think is being portrayed? 3. Ask students what they think caused the problem. 4. This is followed by asking students if they, members of their family, or friends have ever experienced a similar problem. 5. Next, students can share how they responded to the problem. 6. The...

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Using Freire & Fotobabble With English Language Learners

I’ve written several times about how I use critical pedagogy with English Language Learners, specifically using a Freirian model (see “Freire’s Learning Sequence” from this blog and a New York Times piece I wrote). In addition, I’ve often written about how I use the Fotobabble tool, which lets you post an image and provide a thirty second narration with it (see Student Writing & Metacognition). Well, our student teachers and I put the two together this week with our Beginning English Language Learners. Johnny Doolittle, an art teacher at our school, regularly uses his prep (free) period to help our ELLs, and this week did an art project with them. Along with creating art, our student teachers thought it would be a good time to use some Diego Rivera artwork in the context of a critical pedagogy lesson. Students followed this sequence with the art: 1. Show a picture or short video clip portraying a national or international problem, or a common challenge your students face. 2. Next, ask students to share what they believe is happening. What is the problem they think is being portrayed? 3. Ask students what they think caused the problem. 4. This is followed by asking students if they, members of their family, or friends have ever experienced a similar problem. 5. Next, students can share how they responded to the problem. 6. The...

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Making Book Trailers With Fotobabble

I’ve previously posted about the video book trailers we’ll be doing in class during the final week of school next week. As a “warm-up” and for some low-stress practice, we’ve been having students make one minute Fotobabbles about their favorite books of the year. Students just go to Amazon, find the book, right-click on the image, left-click on “View image information” and then copy the “location.” They can then paste that url address into Fotobabble to get the front page of the book. Next, they use the outline I shared in that previous post to say their review. You can see a some excellent examples at our class blog. I’m adding this post to My Best Posts On Books: Why They’re Important & How To Help Students Select, Read, Write & Discuss Them. Share...

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