Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

September 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“What Is Metacognition? Let’s Think About It” Is My New BAM! Radio Show

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What Is Metacognition? Let’s Think About It is the title of my latest ten-minute BAM! Radio Show.

Matt Renwick, Laura Robb and Teresa Diaz join me in the discussion, and they have also all contributed written commentaries on the topic for a future Education Week Teacher column.

I’m adding it to All My BAM Radio Shows – Linked With Descriptions.

September 17, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Look Back: Student Metacognition & Instructional Strategies

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009.

I originally shared this post in 2010. You might also be interested in The Best Posts On Metacognition

I’ve written a lot about Kelly Young, who provides extraordinary training in instructional strategies, plus great curriculum, to schools throughout the United States.

On one of the pages of his Pebble Creeks website, he gives a short overview of the primaryinstructional strategies we use at our school, and at the other ones with whom he works (unfortunately, his website is now off-line).

We recently completed a lesson he developed where students describe each strategy after having spent two months using them. We then have students explain if and how it helps them learn, and then they make a poster out of what they’ve written.

This year, I had my ninth-grade students convert their poster into an essay and post it on our class blog. There are twelve or thirteen essays there now. I always find it interesting to see what students have to say — it helps me see if I have done a good job at helping them see how it’s in their self-interest to do what we do in the class. One of my goals this year was to make a priority of helping students see the “why” behind what we do, so these essays are a good indicator on how successful, or unsuccessful, I’ve been. This kind of metacognition on their part should contribute to their becoming better writers and readers.

Of course, students can always write what they think I want to hear instead of what they really think. But I hope I contribute towards a classroom culture where that isn’t the case.

But I don’t think I can ever know for sure…

Either way, I think the essays are worth a look.

October 27, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Metacognition, Learning Strategies And Student Autonomy” Is My New British Council Post

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Metacognition, Learning Strategies And Student Autonomy is the title of my latest Teaching English – British Council post.

It describes a four-step process I use with my English Language Learners to help them apply metacognition and learning strategies in order to develop more student autonomy.

I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Metacognition.

You can see my all my previous (and there are quite a few of them) Teaching English – British Council posts here.

August 12, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Studies Show, Unsurprisingly, That Stress Reduces Self-Control & Metacognition

In an unsurprising development, on recent study has found that experiencing stress reduces self-control and another research report found that stress has the same effect on metacognition.

These findings reinforce why it’s important to help our students develop strategies to cope with stress (see The Best Resources For Learning About Teens & Stress).

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control

The Best Posts On Metacognition

June 23, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Movie Clips On Metacognition

Since I posted my request for video clips demonstrating metacognition a few hours ago, I’ve received lots of suggestions.

I have turned that post into The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More and added these to it:

Here’s one from Krissy Venosdale:

Jim Windisch recommended Sherlock’s “Mind Palace.” Here’s a link to a good clip (it’s not embeddable).

Leigh Woznick suggests this scene from The Princess Bride:

Leigh also suggests this scene from The Big Bang Theory when Sheldon teaches Penny physics. The most useful part is at about the 4:00 minute mark when Penny tells him she needs for him to slow down:

Metacognition researcher Steve Fleming suggests this Big Bang Theory clip:

I’m wondering if the Beatles song “Help” might work as an example, too:

June 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More

This post was originally just a request to readers for suggested videos.  Though I continue to look for more, I immediately received a number of great recommendations and have turned this post into a “Best” list including videos.

I write a lot about metacognition on this blog (see The Best Posts On Metacognition) and in my books, and help my students develop metacognitive strategies. I’d like to use short clips from TV shows and movies that demonstrate metacognition in action, and was hoping that readers might help me find some.

This post includes several reader-suggested clips – and  can always use more!  Here are links to a few other similar Best video lists on different learning topics, like:

The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More!

The Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit” – Help Me Find More

The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More

The Best Video Clips & Full-Length Movies For Helping To Teach Persuasive Techniques (Help Me Find More)

The Best Video Clips On The Benefits Of Writing Well — Help Me Find More

Here are The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition:

Paul Bruno shared this perfect one:

Here’s one from Krissy Venosdale:

Jim Windisch recommended Sherlock’s “Mind Palace.” Here’s a link to a good clip (it’s not embeddable).

Leigh Woznick suggests this scene from The Princess Bride:

Leigh also suggests this scene from The Big Bang Theory when Sheldon teaches Penny physics. The most useful part is at about the 4:00 minute mark when Penny tells him she needs for him to slow down:

Metacognition researcher Steve Fleming suggests this Big Bang Theory clip:

I’m wondering if the Beatles song “Help” might work as an example, too:

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