Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

October 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: On Metacognition

Too-often-we-teach

I’m a big believer in helping students develop metacognitive skills, and have included related lesson plans in my books and have an extensive The Best Posts On Metacognition list.

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has just published a free book, along with a short blog post, on the topic. It’s specifically geared toward using metacognition in math class, but the advice is pretty universal.

It’s worth checking out…..

July 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Three Good Resources On Metacognition

Here are three new additions to The Best Posts On Metacognition:

Metacognition is from The Center For Teaching.

Promoting Student Metacognition is a very nice chart of questions students can ask themselves.

50 Questions To Help Students Think About What They Think is from Teach Thought.

February 19, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Free Book Excerpts — Lesson Plans On Bloom’s Taxonomy & Metacognition

Eye On Education has just made an excerpt from my upcoming book, Self-Driven Learning, available free online. Just go to the link and click on “Click for PDF sample pages.”

It will lead you to a portion of my chapter on higher-level thinking skills, and includes ideas and lessons for Bloom’s Taxonomy and metacognition. It’s not the entire chapter, but it will certainly give you a flavor of the book, as well as some useful lesson ideas.

June 1, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Very Good Article On Metacognition

I’ve previously posted about a very useful study done on metacognition by Dr. Steve Fleming (see Does Getting Better At Metacognition Physically Alter The Brain?) and his follow-up comments (Update On Metacognition Study).

Today, BrainFacts.org published a nice interview with him discussing metacognition. In fact, it’s been one of the most accessible pieces on the topic that I’ve seen — Metacognition — I Know (or Don’t Know) that I Know.

I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Metacognition.

May 13, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Posts On Metacognition

'Thinking' photo (c) 2008, Wade M - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Helping students strengthen their understanding of metacognition — thinking about their thinking — is an important goal of my teaching. And I’ve written a lot about it. I thought it would be helpful to gather all of those posts in one “The Best…” list.

Here are My Best Posts On Metacognition:

ALSO:

How People Learn:Bridging Research and Practice is a new book from The National Academy Of Sciences and can be read for free online. It focuses on three teaching strategies — activating prior knowledge, focusing on big concept ideas and encouraging pattern recognition, and developing awareness of metacognition.

Do Students Know Enough Smart Learning Strategies? is an important post at MindShift that describes a recent Australian study. It highlights the importance of helping students develop metacognitive skills.

Metacognition and Student Learning is from The Chronicle on Higher Education.

Bringing Metacognition into the Classroom is by Lizzie Pinard.

 

The Importance Of Explaining “Why”

My top ten learner autonomy and metacognition resources is from Lizzie Pinard.

Coming up with explanations helps children develop cause-and-effect thinking skills is a report from Science Daily on a new study.

The role of metacognition in language learning is by Lizzie Pinard.

Helping language learners visualise their linguistic development: growing learning is by Lizzie Pinard.

Metacognition is from The Center For Teaching.

Promoting Student Metacognition is a very nice chart of questions students can ask themselves.

50 Questions To Help Students Think About What They Think is from Teach Thought.


Quote Of The Day: On Metacognition

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 900 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

April 24, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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What Is Metacognition?

The Royal Society has just published a journal issue on metacognition.

It’s pretty technical, and I don’t think particularly helpful to teachers.

However, they also published a short video interview with the guest editors of the journal. In it, one of the editors, Christopher Frith, had some useful comments on metacognition. I think most of us know it already, but it was helpful to hear it anyway. It’s just another reminder to me about creating a “The Best…” list on my posts about metacognition.

Here are his two comments that struck me:

Psychologists describe [metacognition] as monitoring and control. An example is when you’re doing something like typing, you monitor what you’re doing so you notice if you’ve made an error and then you slow down — which is the control bit — to prevent the error from happening in the future.

At the very top end of metacognition when we are reflecting on what we’re doing, it has a very important social function. We can actually tell people why we did something. It turns out that most of the time we’re not very good at knowing why we do things. But by actually discussing it with other people we get better.

April 8, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Student Writing & Metacognition

I’ve previously posted about having English Language Learner students write and describe the process they’ve used to write an essay (see A Pretty Darn Good Lesson — If I Say So Myself :) ). They then record themselves using the Fotobabble web tool.

I’ve got to collect all my posts related to metacognition into a “The Best…” list…

Last week, I had my Beginning ELL students do something similar, but a little different.

We’ve been working writing research essays, and using graphic organizers that they construct. Their first one was on an animal of their choosing (we’re going on a field trip to the zoo soon). They’ll be doing another one on a country of their choice and, to further solidify the writing process in their minds, they described the process they used. They’re holding their essays and their graphic organizers in the photos.

It’s a simple exercise that covers all four domains — reading, writing, speaking, and listening (we post them on our class blog and show them to the class).

Here are a couple of examples: