Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 1, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Great Clip From “Lady Bird” On A Growth Mindset

My daughter, granddaughter and I went to see the movie, “Lady Bird,” this afternoon.

It’s a great movie, and I say that not because it’s very Sacramento-centric.

There’s also a great clip in it about a growth mindset.

Here’s the quote itself in text form, followed by the video clip itself (I’ve embedded the trailer, and it should be set to start at the 2:17 mark when the growth mindset piece takes place):

 

I’m adding this to:

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Apps, Online Tools & Other Resources For Math

December 29, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: My Best Ever Growth Mindset Lesson

Over the next ten days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

The headline of this post was originally My Growth Mindset Lessons Usually Go Well, But What I Did Today Was The Best Yet (Student Hand-Outs Included)

I’ve done a variety of different types of lessons over the years about a growth mindset, and you can see most of them at The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” – along with a ton of other related resources.

The one I did today, though, was probably the best one yet.

Our school emphasizes Social Emotional Learning, and a growth mindset is our focus for September.  A number of us are responsible for giving formal SEL lessons to our classes, while other teachers are provided with professional development about how to support it in their classes.

Today, I did the lesson with my English Language Learner United States History class.  Truth-be-told, I was probably a bit more motivated than usual to do something new and creative for two reasons  – one, because, even though the lesson I had done for the past two years was a good one, I a bit tired of it and, two, members of the California State Board of Education were coming in to observe it.

Here’s what I did:

I first began by providing a definition of a growth mindset.  I asked students what “grow” meant, and then what “mind” meant.  I continues by explaining it meant to grow our mind by looking at problems as just another thing to get through, and not to feel stopped by them – they were opportunities to “grow our mind.”

I then showed each of these three video clips (which I’ve used in prior lessons).  After each one, I had student think for a moment about what the video clip might be saying about what a growth mindset meant. Students shared with a partner, and then I called on students to share with the entire class.  Below the clips, I’ve included a picture of the easel paper showing what students came up with….

I then distributed, and read aloud, these three stories showing a growth mindset. I explained that as I read them, students should be thinking of their own examples since they would be writing them next. You can download it here.

GROWTH MINDSET STORIES-19tapjv

Next, I gave students this writing frame (you can download it here). I asked them to think about what we wrote on the easel paper about the elements of a growth mindset, and try to remember a time when they acted like that. We went through each section one-at-a-time, and then students copied them down into a paragraph. Everyone was very engaged.

Almost everyone finished their story (many, though not all, were about learning English). Tomorrow, students will be sharing them with each other and, eventually, posting them on our class blog. The sharing should be a good community-building experience.

In addition, we now have a common growth mindset vocabulary which enables me to not have to say, “Jose, please put your head up.” Instead, I will be able to say, “Jose, remember our growth mindset lesson?” That should help students, and will be much more energizing for me, too!

September 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Study Suggests That Motivation & Growth Mindset Are Most Important Factors For Student Success

McKinsey & Company, who doesn’t have the greatest track record when it comes to education-related studies, just came out with a new study examining PISA results from around the world.

It’s titled How to improve student educational outcomes: New insights from data analytics.

They suggest that student motivation and having a growth mindset are the most important factors related to student success:

They even make this claim, which I think is somewhat questionable (see The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher (& Outside Factors) Have On Student Achievement):

Our conclusion: after controlling for all other factors, student mindsets are twice as predictive of students’ PISA scores than even their home environment and demographics (Exhibit 1). This finding, and its magnitude, is consistent across all five regions, which amplifies its importance.

Nevertheless, even if they are over-stating their case, this research provides more evidence to those of us who support helping students develop intrinsic motivation (see  Best Posts On “Motivating” Students) and a growth mindset (see The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” ).

September 26, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Growth Mindset Lessons Usually Go Well, But What I Did Today Was The Best Yet (Student Hand-Outs Included)

I’ve done a variety of different types of lessons over the years about a growth mindset, and you can see most of them at The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” – along with a ton of other related resources.

The one I did today, though, was probably the best one yet.

Our school emphasizes Social Emotional Learning, and a growth mindset is our focus for September.  A number of us are responsible for giving formal SEL lessons to our classes, while other teachers are provided with professional development about how to support it in their classes.

Today, I did the lesson with my English Language Learner United States History class.  Truth-be-told, I was probably a bit more motivated than usual to do something new and creative for two reasons  – one, because, even though the lesson I had done for the past two years was a good one, I a bit tired of it and, two, members of the California State Board of Education were coming in to observe it.

Here’s what I did:

I first began by providing a definition of a growth mindset.  I asked students what “grow” meant, and then what “mind” meant.  I continues by explaining it meant to grow our mind by looking at problems as just another thing to get through, and not to feel stopped by them – they were opportunities to “grow our mind.”

I then showed each of these three video clips (which I’ve used in prior lessons).  After each one, I had student think for a moment about what the video clip might be saying about what a growth mindset meant. Students shared with a partner, and then I called on students to share with the entire class.  Below the clips, I’ve included a picture of the easel paper showing what students came up with….

I then distributed, and read aloud, these three stories showing a growth mindset. I explained that as I read them, students should be thinking of their own examples since they would be writing them next. You can download it here.

GROWTH MINDSET STORIES-19tapjv

Next, I gave students this writing frame (you can download it here). I asked them to think about what we wrote on the easel paper about the elements of a growth mindset, and try to remember a time when they acted like that. We went through each section one-at-a-time, and then students copied them down into a paragraph. Everyone was very engaged.

Almost everyone finished their story (many, though not all, were about learning English). Tomorrow, students will be sharing them with each other and, eventually, posting them on our class blog. The sharing should be a good community-building experience.

In addition, we now have a common growth mindset vocabulary which enables me to not have to say, “Jose, please put your head up.” Instead, I will be able to say, “Jose, remember our growth mindset lesson?” That should help students, and will be much more energizing for me, too!

August 9, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Good Short Growth Mindset Video

Here’s a nice video from Jo Boaler on a growth mindset and its impact on the brain. It specifically talks about math, but would be useful in any subject.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning

July 17, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: “An Introduction to Growth Mindset”

It’s not like there’s a shortage of videos about a growth mindset, and you can find a bunch of them at The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

I’m adding this short one from Angela Duckworth’s Character Lab to the list:

An Introduction to Growth Mindset from Character Lab on Vimeo.

January 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Study Connects Growth Mindset & “Bouncing Back” From Mistakes

Kids should pay more attention to mistakes, study suggests is the headline of a Science Daily report on a new study.

The study finds, to no one’s surprised, that people with a growth mindset bounce back from mistakes more easily than those with a fixed mindset.

Here’s an excerpt:

Here’s more on what the researchers say:

Many parents and teachers shy away from addressing a child’s mistakes, telling them “It’s OK, you’ll get it the next time,” without giving them the opportunity to figure out what went wrong, Schroder said.

“Instead they could say: ‘Mistakes happen, so let’s try to pay attention to what went wrong and figure it out.'”

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

 

January 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “Opportunities & Dangers Of Big New Growth Mindset Study”

In February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

This post originally appeared in 2016:

Danger Deep WaterCreative Commons License Michael Reilly via Compfight

As regular readers know, I’m a big fan of the growth mindset concept (see The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”) , though not entirely an uncritical one (see Our Students Are Not Supermen & Superwomen and The Limits To The Power Of A Growth Mindset (& The Dangers When We Don’t Recognize Them) )

Carol Dweck, Susana Claro and PERTS Lab founder David Paunesku just published a big new study – today – on the use of a growth mindset with students in country of Chile.

Education Week has a nice summary of it. You can read the study here, though it’s behind a paywall.

My layperson’s analysis of it is that it offers, as this blog post’s headline says, “opportunities and dangers.”

OPPORTUNITIES

It certainly provides support to those of us who want to spend time in the classroom teaching about and reinforcing a growth mindset with our students.  The study says that students having a growth mindset  from families with an income in the lowest ten percentile achieved comparable test scores to students with a fixed mindset who came from families with the 80th family income percentile.

That seemed way too good to be true, even for a believer like me.  I wondered if, perhaps, one factor mitigating this kind of leap could be if income inequality was considerably less there than here (that issue has been found to influence many aspects of people’s lives – see The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality — Help Me Create A Simple Lesson Plan Using Them).  Much to my surprise, I learned that Chile is one of the few countries in the world with a higher degree of income equality than the United States!

So, unless I’m missing something, and I’m open to being told I am, it seems like an impressive result demonstrating the potential positive impact of emphasizing a growth mindset in school.

The study also found that “the lowest-income Chilean students were twice as likely as the highest income students to report a fixed mindset…” It suggests that, as other research has shown (see The Best Articles About The Study Showing Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough ), some of the difficulties some people who come from low-income communities have in applying certain Social Emotional Learning skills to academic endeavors are as a consequence of the socio-economic challenges they face, not the other way around.  I do wish, though, the researchers had put a little more “meat” into that explanation.

DANGERS

Unfortunately, the “Let Them Eat Character” crowd could very well use these kinds of results to push for growth-mindset lessons instead of providing adequate support for schools, students and their families.

The researchers end with – what seems to me, at least – this attempt to inoculate themselves against being accused of supporting that kind of strategy:

“To be clear, we are not suggesting that structural factors, like income inequality or disparities in school quality, are less important than psychological factors. Nor are we saying that teaching students a growth mindset is a substitute for systemic efforts to alleviate poverty and economic inequality. Such claims would stand at odds with decades of research and our own data. Rather, we are suggesting that structural inequalities can give rise to psychological inequalities and that those psychological inequalities can reinforce the impact of structural inequalities on achievement and future opportunity. As such, research on psychological factors can help illuminate one set of processes through which economic disadvantage leads to academic underachievement and reveal ways to more effectively support students who face additional challenges because of their socioeconomic circumstances.”

I’m not sure when your entire paper can be easily interpreted as saying that having a growth mindset can eliminate most of the achievement (or better, “opportunity”) gap, this short paragraph is enough…

If you can get though the paywall, or if you can at least read the Ed Week summary, let me know what you think of my analysis….

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