Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

March 27, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Important Reminder That We Need To Praise Process To Support A Growth Mindset

Sarah Sparks over at Ed Week has a great write-up about a new study finding that praising effort alone is not enough to promote a growth mindset among teenagers – we have to praise specific strategies/actions they took.

As Sarah points out, educators often talk about growth-mindset praise as focusing on effort, so this study is a good reminder we need to also include talking about “process.”

My suspicion, however, is that many educators are like me – we use the “praise effort, not intelligence” mantra as a way to describe what we should do, but that our actual practice also includes emphasizing the specific actions/strategies the students used.

Here’s a piece adapted from one of my books where I wrote about this very topic:

Teacher feedback should focus on praising effort, hard work and specific learning strategies (“I noticed that you were practicing pronouncing the words and asking your partner for advice before you read that passage to the class, and it really showed”). This type of feedback has also been called “process praise” Just encouraging students to try harder can fall into the rut of “If the only tool you have is a hammer, then everything looks like a nail.” Without the appropriate learning strategies even the hardest working student might not be successful.

As David Yeager, Gregory Walton and Geoffrey L. Cohen wrote in their article, “Addressing Achieving Gaps With Psychological Interventions”: “Effective growth mindset interventions challenge the myth that raw ability matters most by teaching the fuller formula for success: effort + strategies + help from others.”

You should read Sarah’s article. However, if you can’t get past the paywall (I would encourage you to subscribe – it’s worth it!), another important part she writes about are recommendations from Professor Mary Murphy for other ways to help students develop a growth mindset:

Providing opportunities for students to reflect on their own learning.

Highlight mistakes in the everyday practice of learning.

Use group work where peers discuss what they each struggled with and explore individual strengths of different students.

I’m adding this post to:

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students

You might also be interested in:

The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures

The Best Resources On Student & Teacher Reflection

March 17, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“A Warm-Up ‘Mindset’ Helps Students & Teachers”

A Warm-Up ‘Mindset’ Helps Students & Teachers is the headline of my latest Education Week Teacher column.

In it, Matthew Homrich-Knieling, Dr. Nancy Sulla, Michele L. Haiken, Jim Peterson, Rachel Baker, and Louise Goldberg write about their suggestions for Do Now activities (also known as Warm-Ups).

Here are some excerpts:

March 4, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Results Just Unveiled Of Big New Growth Mindset Study Co-Authored By A Ton Of Well-Known SEL Researchers

 

Thanks to Benjamin Riley, this morning I learned about the results of a big new growth mindset study that was released yesterday, Where and For Whom Can a Brief, Scalable Mindset Intervention Improve Adolescents’ Educational Trajectories? (happily, not behind a paywall).

It’s written by a zillion of the biggest names in Social Emotional Learning Research (David Yeager, Paul Hanselman, David Paunesku, Christopher Hulleman, Carol Dweck, Chandra Muller, Robert Crosnoe, Gregory Walton, Elizabeth Tipton, Angela Duckworth).

Using a representative sample of U.S. schools and their students, they found that students doing two twenty-five minute online lessons about a growth mindset resulted in a small but important academic gain (measured by GPA’s), with larger improvements found among students who had a track record of experiencing academic and socio/economic challenges.

They also found greater gains in schools they say “support greater challenge-seeking or academic effort.” That makes sense to me, though their measurement of that climate seems a little odd (if students chose to do more challenging math problems on a test).

Though they don’t really describe the content of the online lessons in detail, they fortunately point to a previous paper that does – Using Design Thinking to Improve Psychological Interventions: The Case of the Growth Mindset During the Transition to High School (and that paper also is not behind a paywall!). The content is pretty well described there between pages 377-379).

I’m going to review that paper and the most recent version of the growth mindset lesson I teach (My Growth Mindset Lessons Usually Go Well, But What I Did Today Was The Best Yet (Student Hand-Outs Included)to see what, if any changes, I might want to make to it.

I suspect that most teachers and schools teaching about the growth mindset don’t need a study to know that it’s effective, but it’s really nice to know that to-notch research like this paper supports our beliefs.  And, with luck, it will bring even more people on-board….

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

 

January 1, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Great Clip From “Lady Bird” On A Growth Mindset

My daughter, granddaughter and I went to see the movie, “Lady Bird,” this afternoon.

It’s a great movie, and I say that not because it’s very Sacramento-centric.

There’s also a great clip in it about a growth mindset.

Here’s the quote itself in text form, followed by the video clip itself (I’ve embedded the trailer, and it should be set to start at the 2:17 mark when the growth mindset piece takes place):

 

I’m adding this to:

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Apps, Online Tools & Other Resources For Math

December 29, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: My Best Ever Growth Mindset Lesson

Over the next ten days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

The headline of this post was originally My Growth Mindset Lessons Usually Go Well, But What I Did Today Was The Best Yet (Student Hand-Outs Included)

I’ve done a variety of different types of lessons over the years about a growth mindset, and you can see most of them at The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” – along with a ton of other related resources.

The one I did today, though, was probably the best one yet.

Our school emphasizes Social Emotional Learning, and a growth mindset is our focus for September.  A number of us are responsible for giving formal SEL lessons to our classes, while other teachers are provided with professional development about how to support it in their classes.

Today, I did the lesson with my English Language Learner United States History class.  Truth-be-told, I was probably a bit more motivated than usual to do something new and creative for two reasons  – one, because, even though the lesson I had done for the past two years was a good one, I a bit tired of it and, two, members of the California State Board of Education were coming in to observe it.

Here’s what I did:

I first began by providing a definition of a growth mindset.  I asked students what “grow” meant, and then what “mind” meant.  I continues by explaining it meant to grow our mind by looking at problems as just another thing to get through, and not to feel stopped by them – they were opportunities to “grow our mind.”

I then showed each of these three video clips (which I’ve used in prior lessons).  After each one, I had student think for a moment about what the video clip might be saying about what a growth mindset meant. Students shared with a partner, and then I called on students to share with the entire class.  Below the clips, I’ve included a picture of the easel paper showing what students came up with….

I then distributed, and read aloud, these three stories showing a growth mindset. I explained that as I read them, students should be thinking of their own examples since they would be writing them next. You can download it here.

GROWTH MINDSET STORIES-19tapjv

Next, I gave students this writing frame (you can download it here). I asked them to think about what we wrote on the easel paper about the elements of a growth mindset, and try to remember a time when they acted like that. We went through each section one-at-a-time, and then students copied them down into a paragraph. Everyone was very engaged.

Almost everyone finished their story (many, though not all, were about learning English). Tomorrow, students will be sharing them with each other and, eventually, posting them on our class blog. The sharing should be a good community-building experience.

In addition, we now have a common growth mindset vocabulary which enables me to not have to say, “Jose, please put your head up.” Instead, I will be able to say, “Jose, remember our growth mindset lesson?” That should help students, and will be much more energizing for me, too!

September 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Study Suggests That Motivation & Growth Mindset Are Most Important Factors For Student Success

McKinsey & Company, who doesn’t have the greatest track record when it comes to education-related studies, just came out with a new study examining PISA results from around the world.

It’s titled How to improve student educational outcomes: New insights from data analytics.

They suggest that student motivation and having a growth mindset are the most important factors related to student success:

They even make this claim, which I think is somewhat questionable (see The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher (& Outside Factors) Have On Student Achievement):

Our conclusion: after controlling for all other factors, student mindsets are twice as predictive of students’ PISA scores than even their home environment and demographics (Exhibit 1). This finding, and its magnitude, is consistent across all five regions, which amplifies its importance.

Nevertheless, even if they are over-stating their case, this research provides more evidence to those of us who support helping students develop intrinsic motivation (see  Best Posts On “Motivating” Students) and a growth mindset (see The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” ).

September 26, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Growth Mindset Lessons Usually Go Well, But What I Did Today Was The Best Yet (Student Hand-Outs Included)

I’ve done a variety of different types of lessons over the years about a growth mindset, and you can see most of them at The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” – along with a ton of other related resources.

The one I did today, though, was probably the best one yet.

Our school emphasizes Social Emotional Learning, and a growth mindset is our focus for September.  A number of us are responsible for giving formal SEL lessons to our classes, while other teachers are provided with professional development about how to support it in their classes.

Today, I did the lesson with my English Language Learner United States History class.  Truth-be-told, I was probably a bit more motivated than usual to do something new and creative for two reasons  – one, because, even though the lesson I had done for the past two years was a good one, I a bit tired of it and, two, members of the California State Board of Education were coming in to observe it.

Here’s what I did:

I first began by providing a definition of a growth mindset.  I asked students what “grow” meant, and then what “mind” meant.  I continues by explaining it meant to grow our mind by looking at problems as just another thing to get through, and not to feel stopped by them – they were opportunities to “grow our mind.”

I then showed each of these three video clips (which I’ve used in prior lessons).  After each one, I had student think for a moment about what the video clip might be saying about what a growth mindset meant. Students shared with a partner, and then I called on students to share with the entire class.  Below the clips, I’ve included a picture of the easel paper showing what students came up with….

I then distributed, and read aloud, these three stories showing a growth mindset. I explained that as I read them, students should be thinking of their own examples since they would be writing them next. You can download it here.

GROWTH MINDSET STORIES-19tapjv

Next, I gave students this writing frame (you can download it here). I asked them to think about what we wrote on the easel paper about the elements of a growth mindset, and try to remember a time when they acted like that. We went through each section one-at-a-time, and then students copied them down into a paragraph. Everyone was very engaged.

Almost everyone finished their story (many, though not all, were about learning English). Tomorrow, students will be sharing them with each other and, eventually, posting them on our class blog. The sharing should be a good community-building experience.

In addition, we now have a common growth mindset vocabulary which enables me to not have to say, “Jose, please put your head up.” Instead, I will be able to say, “Jose, remember our growth mindset lesson?” That should help students, and will be much more energizing for me, too!

Skip to toolbar