Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

September 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Hans Rosling Video: “How not to be ignorant about the world”

TED Talks just released a new Hans Rosling video (done with his son) called “How not to be ignorant about the world.”

You can see it on the TED Talk site with all its bells and whistles, including a transcript, but I’ve embedded the YouTube version below.

I’m, of course, adding it to The Best Hans Rosling Videos:

November 4, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Hans Rosling Videos

'SEB seminar: China's Challenge' photo (c) 2010, Swedish Pavilion at Shanghai Expo 2010 - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

You may, or may not, be familiar with Hans Rosling’s famous videos explaining world demographics and their economic and social implications.

He just published a new one, and I figured I’d take the opportunity to his previous videos that I’ve in blog:

Here’s his newest one:

His latest TED Talk is called Religions and Babies:

A PBS News Hour report about him is embedded here. You can also get the transcript at their site:

Watch Rosling Brings Life, Sword-Swallowing to Health Statistics on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

And here’s his amazing video on the world:

Here he uses Legos to explain population growth and climate change:

June 8, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Video: “Hans Rosling explains population growth and climate change”

I’ve previously posted many of Hans Rosling’s great video explanation of world demographics and their economic and social implications.

Thanks to Flowing Data, I just learned about this new one, where he uses Legos to explain population growth and climate change:

February 1, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

PBS Report On Hans Rosling

If you’ve seen the amazing video “Hans Rosling’s 200 Countries, 200 Years, 4 Minutes,” (and if you haven’t, I’ve embedded it at the end of this post — you can also find it on Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010) you’ll want to see yesterday’s PBS News Hour report, which is embedded here. You can also get the transcript at their site:

Watch Rosling Brings Life, Sword-Swallowing to Health Statistics on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

And here’s his amazing video on the world:

December 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two

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Another day, another year-end annual “Best” list (you can find all 1,400 Best lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators ; The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More ; The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More! and The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two:

Neil deGrasse Tyson responds to six-year-old – “How can first graders help the earth?”:

In The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom, which is — by far — the most popular post I’ve ever published, I include videos using Star Wars, Finding Nemo, Pirates of the Caribbean, and other movies to teach Bloom’s.

Here’s another such video, and this one uses scenes from Harry Potter. Unfortunately, it has embedding disabled, so you’ll have to go to the link on YouTube.

Here’s a well-done video that provides an excellent short video of Carol Dweck’s research. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students. It’s also the only video on this list that I’m adding to The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators:

Thanks to Wendi Pillars for sharing this video on Twitter. I’m adding it to The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar.

Bill Ferriter, whose blog has been one of the few on my blog roll for many years (and it should be in your RSS Reader, too), recently shared this video. I suspect this video will be played far-and-wide among English (and other subject) classrooms (it sure received lots of retweets on Twitter). It’s about a star football player’s engagement with reading.

I’m adding it to The Best Videos & Articles Where Athletes Explain How Reading & Writing Well Has Helped Their Career.

Here’s a good one titled “What Is Literature For?”:

What is Literature for? from Marcus Armitage on Vimeo.

Here’s a fun video on reading:

This interactive video, a book trailer for “Does Santa Claus exist?” is an amazing one on many different levels. I’ll certainly be having my IB Theory of Knowledge students watch it:

Sesame Street released a video called “The Power Of Yet” — a message on the growth mindset idea that even if you haven’t succeeded now, it’s just a matter of “not yet.” I’m adding this video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

Tavis Smiley has a new book out titled “Death of a King: The Real Story Of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Final Year.”

He did a terrific interview on the Daily Show, and I’m adding this video to The Best Resources To Remember Dr. Martin Luther King’s Death (& Life).

TED Talks released a new Hans Rosling video (done with his son) called “How not to be ignorant about the world.” You can see it on the TED Talk site with all its bells and whistles, including a transcript, but I’ve embedded the YouTube version below. I’m, of course, adding it to The Best Hans Rosling Videos:

I’m adding this great video segment to The Best Resources For Learning About The Children Refugee Crisis At The U.S. Southern Border:

Two film-making students:

created an animated simulation of life through the eyes of a non-verbal child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) “and her constant struggle to cope with the world around her,” as they write in their artist statement.

That description comes from an article in the New York Times headlined Look At Life Through Autistic Eyes. Here’s the video:

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Walking In Someone Else’s Shoes, which contains other similar resources.

Check out this Kid President video. I originally posted it with this title: “I Don’t Hear Students Thanking This Retiring Teacher For Helping Them Score Well On Standardized Tests”:

TED Talks now has an updated playlist of The 20 most popular talks of all time.

Donna Brazile announced the formation of Democrats For Public Education at the American Federation of Teachers Convention in Los Angeles. It’s designed to support effective and teacher-supported education efforts. You’ve got to watch this of her speech at the Convention:

We’ve all seen dogs barking at each other through fences.

But I doubt you’ve ever seen them do this….

If you feel like it, leave a comment completing this sentence:

“This is an allegory for…….”

June 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

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Another day, another mid-year “Best” list (you can find all 1,300 Best lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators and The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far:

Over at Vox, Ezra Klein interviews Ta-Nehisi Coates about his article, “The Case for Reparations.” I’ve embedded the video below, but Vox has a nice interactive table of contents that might make it more useful — especially if you don’t have an hour to watch the whole thing. I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism.

Who’s not familiar with the famous Schoolhouse Rock video, I’m Just A Bill? Just in case, though, it’s the second video after this description. The first video is an updated version by Vox that is more cynical and more accurate (I’m not sure of that one will show-up in an RSS Reader).

I added this video to The Best Hans Rosling Videos:

I added this video to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research:

I’ve previously posted the video and links to the full text of George Saunders’ well known commencement speech on “The Importance of Kindness.”

Now, this animation of part of it has been created….

I added this next video from Business Insider to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures:

I added this amazing video to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About World History:

Watch as 1000 years of European borders change (timelapse map) from Nick Mironenko on Vimeo.

I added this video to The Best “Language Maps”:

TED Talks unveiled a new animation titled “The Long Reach Of Reason.”

Here’s how Chris Anderson at TED describes it:

Two years ago the psychologist Steven Pinker and the philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, who are married, came to TED to take part in a form of Socratic dialog. Steven Pinker and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein: The long reach of reasonSteven Pinker and Rebecca Newberger Goldstein: The long reach of reasonShe sought to argue that Reason was a much more powerful force in history than it’s normally given credit for. He initially defended the modern consensus among psychologists and neurologists, that most human behavior is best explained through other means: unconscious instincts of various kinds. But over the course of the dialog, he is persuaded by her, and together they look back through history and see how reasoned arguments ended up having massive impacts, even if those impacts sometimes took centuries to unfold.

They turned it into a “talk in animated dialogue form.” I’ve embedded it below, and you can read more about it here.

This next video is only a little over two minutes. Watch it til the very end…

Neil deGrasse Tyson shared this great video showing effective teaching in action. I’ve added it to The Best Places To Learn About (And View Video Clips Of) Teachers In The Movies:

Here are two good videos. Make a point of reading Joe Bower’s analyses of the South African reading commercial (the first video) and of the video of the young girl learning to ski. You won’t be disappointed.

John McCarthy shared this short video clip of U.S. Olympic bobsledder Lolo Jones. She begins by sharing her favorite quote (though doesn’t cite the source and I can’t find it online, either):

“A failure isn’t a failure if it prepares you for success tomorrow”

I showed the video to my students, along with writing that quotation on the board. Then, I asked them to respond to this writing prompt:

What is Lolo Jones saying about how we should view failure? What do you think of her view? To develop your position, be sure to include specific examples. These examples can come from the video, anything else you’ve read, and/or your own observations and experiences.

I added this to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures and to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction (where I collect all my writing prompts).

I’m Not Sure You’ll Find A Better Video Illustrating The Importance Of Libraries Than “El Bibliotecario”:

The Librarian / El Bibliotecario from Facebook Stories on Vimeo.

This is a very creative video from TED-Ed. You can see the whole lesson here.

Ann Foreman shared this Life of Brian video on Facebook. It’s a classic scene of how NOT to teach grammar:

TED Ed shared a nice lesson and video called “Who Invited Writing?” You can see the entire lesson here:

Do we teach like cats or dogs? This video was shared by Daniel Coyle on Twitter:

I’ve added this video to The Best Online Resources For Teaching & Learning About World War II (Part Two):

I don’t think I’d use this with students, but, as Greg Toppo said when he shared this on Twitter, it seems like a “spot-on take on bullying.”

Because of that, I’m adding it to A Very, Very Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Bullying.

April 18, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Guest Post: Commentary On Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations

'spring 2012 hackNY student hackathon presentations' photo (c) 2012, hackNY.org - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

I’ve been publishing guest commentaries on all the changes this year in International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge classes, and you can see them all here.

And here’s another one!

Today’s piece is from Brad Ovenell-Carter. Brad is the director of educational technology and TOK department head at Mulgrave School, an independent, coed K12 IB World School in Vancouver, Canada. Like Mark Twain, he thinks the ancients stole all out good ideas. And he wants them back:

I really like the general move towards more holistic learning and assessment in TOK. The old, analytic approach lead to monolithic interpretations of the areas of knowledge and to so-called “naked ways of knowing.” The essay, in particular, is much improved by the new global impression marking.

The oral presentation guide never had quite the same flaw as its assessment tool was always more global. Still, it too is made better in the new guide and I especially appreciate the renewed emphasis on finding practical applications of TOK.

Nevertheless, I am quite bothered by a thought experiment:

Suppose after working with her teacher and following the new TOK oral presentation guide, a student submits a perfect planning document for her TOK oral presentation. Then suppose at the last minute she ditches her original idea and documentation and on the day of her presentation delivers an inspired and brilliant session on something completely different–without any supporting documents.

Now, would she write her planning document retroactively? Even if that were permissible, why would I ask her to do that? When I hear a great lecture I don’t ask to see the planning document, I just listen. I have Hans Rosling’s planning notes for a lecture he gave to 1600 people and they are literally only a thin sketch of his characteristically compelling presentation. Would I have to fail her on the grounds that she didn’t tell me what she was going to say? That makes no sense for the same reason. Can a TOK presentation be made without a planning document? The guide says no.

I am not at all suggesting there should be no planning. I do question whether the heightened importance of the planning document in the new guide effectively asks us to assess how well the the presentation matched the planning document, not the presentation itself.

December 1, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

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Here’s the latest in annual The Best…” posts….

This post includes my choices for videos since I posted The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far six months ago.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators and The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two:

Perseverance (grit) is one of the key qualities researchers have found to be essential in a successful language learner, as well as other learners.

Here’s a video demonstrating that quality that I’m adding to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

As I constantly tell my students, the ability to identify patterns is a key to higher-order thinking and to language-learning.

This would be a great video to play — at first, without sound — and have students try to identify the pattern in the images they see…

This is from Yahoo News and is a great illustration of “thinking outside the box”:

Here’s another “thinking outside the box video:

I’ve written in my New York Times column about how I use optical illusions with English Language Learners, and I certainly use them when teaching perception in my Theory of Knowledge class. You can many that I’ve previously posted here.

Here’s a new neat one created by Honda and puts many different illusions into one short video:

Here’s the newest Hans Rosling video:

I’ve written extensively in my books and in this blog about the lessons I use with students to help them want to develop more self-control.

And I’ve also shared new videos from Sesame Street highlighting their emphasis on teaching self-control, grit, and respect this season.

My high school students love the Sesame Street videos, which I use as a short “refresher” during the year after we do our initial lesson on self-control.

This one on “The Waiting Game,” though, is the best one yet. In it, Cookie Monster demonstrates each of the strategies that Dr. Walter Mischel recommends that people use (and that he saw children apply in the marshmallow test) to enhance their self-control.

I’ll be showing the video to students and having them identify each of those strategies:

I’m adding this great video from The Center For Teaching Quality to The Best Resources On Being A Teacherpreneur:

I Wonder How Many Of Our Students Hear This When We Go Over Classroom Rules?:

I’ve previously shared a thirteen minute version of Bloom’s Taxonomy According to Andy Griffith, which you can find at The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

The video’s creator has now edited its length down considerably. Here’s the new version:

Last year, John T. Spencer began a great Twitter hashtag called #saidnoteacherever.

I brought together a collection of them at A Sampling Of The Best Tweets With The #SaidNoTeacherEver Hashtag.

Now, some teachers have done a short video person — unfortunately, without giving credit to John and the original source. But it is pretty funny. And if you go to watch it on YouTube, people have made some pretty nice additions in the comments.

This next video is the best one I’ve Seen On Perseverance & Resilience.

This video is part of a new TED-Ed Lesson titled There’s no dishonor in having a disability. You can see the entire lesson here.

All I can say is…Wow.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit.”

Tom Whitford was kind enough to share this fun video on Twitter. It’s the first in a series (you can see the rest by going directly to YouTube).

Everybody will enjoy it, but especially ESL teachers:

I’m adding this next video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

I’ve previously posted about George Saunders’ recent commencement speech. Here’s a video of his address:

I’m adding this video to A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics:

You can read more about NASA’s latest video on climate change showing what happens to the United States.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

This is a short video on scaffolding from Beyond The Bubble, a history site about which I’ve previously posted.

Thought it talks about history, its scaffolding recommendations can be helpful in any subject.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

“I shall either find a way or make one” has been attributed to Hannibal, though he probably didn’t say it.

This goat seems to exemplify that expression — no matter who said it.

I’m adding it to The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting.

Edublogs has created this video on “What Is A Blog?”

I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Teachers (And Others!) On How To Be Better Bloggers and to My Best Posts For Tech Novices (Plus A Few From Other People).

You might also be interested in the other 1,200 “The Best…” lists I’ve posted.

November 27, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

November’s “The Best…” Lists — There Are Now 1,207 Of Them

November 1, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

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Here’s the latest in annual The Best…” posts….

This post includes my choices for videos since I posted The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far six months ago.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators and The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two:

Perseverance (grit) is one of the key qualities researchers have found to be essential in a successful language learner, as well as other learners.

Here’s a video demonstrating that quality that I’m adding to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

As I constantly tell my students, the ability to identify patterns is a key to higher-order thinking and to language-learning.

This would be a great video to play — at first, without sound — and have students try to identify the pattern in the images they see…

This is from Yahoo News and is a great illustration of “thinking outside the box”:

Here’s another “thinking outside the box video:

I’ve written in my New York Times column about how I use optical illusions with English Language Learners, and I certainly use them when teaching perception in my Theory of Knowledge class. You can many that I’ve previously posted here.

Here’s a new neat one created by Honda and puts many different illusions into one short video:

Here’s the newest Hans Rosling video:

I’ve written extensively in my books and in this blog about the lessons I use with students to help them want to develop more self-control.

And I’ve also shared new videos from Sesame Street highlighting their emphasis on teaching self-control, grit, and respect this season.

My high school students love the Sesame Street videos, which I use as a short “refresher” during the year after we do our initial lesson on self-control.

This one on “The Waiting Game,” though, is the best one yet. In it, Cookie Monster demonstrates each of the strategies that Dr. Walter Mischel recommends that people use (and that he saw children apply in the marshmallow test) to enhance their self-control.

I’ll be showing the video to students and having them identify each of those strategies:

I’m adding this great video from The Center For Teaching Quality to The Best Resources On Being A Teacherpreneur:

I Wonder How Many Of Our Students Hear This When We Go Over Classroom Rules?:

I’ve previously shared a thirteen minute version of Bloom’s Taxonomy According to Andy Griffith, which you can find at The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

The video’s creator has now edited its length down considerably. Here’s the new version:

Last year, John T. Spencer began a great Twitter hashtag called #saidnoteacherever.

I brought together a collection of them at A Sampling Of The Best Tweets With The #SaidNoTeacherEver Hashtag.

Now, some teachers have done a short video person — unfortunately, without giving credit to John and the original source. But it is pretty funny. And if you go to watch it on YouTube, people have made some pretty nice additions in the comments.

This next video is the best one I’ve Seen On Perseverance & Resilience.

This video is part of a new TED-Ed Lesson titled There’s no dishonor in having a disability. You can see the entire lesson here.

All I can say is…Wow.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit.”

Tom Whitford was kind enough to share this fun video on Twitter. It’s the first in a series (you can see the rest by going directly to YouTube).

Everybody will enjoy it, but especially ESL teachers:

I’m adding this next video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

I’ve previously posted about George Saunders’ recent commencement speech. Here’s a video of his address:

I’m adding this video to A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics:

You can read more about NASA’s latest video on climate change showing what happens to the United States.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

This is a short video on scaffolding from Beyond The Bubble, a history site about which I’ve previously posted.

Thought it talks about history, its scaffolding recommendations can be helpful in any subject.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

“I shall either find a way or make one” has been attributed to Hannibal, though he probably didn’t say it.

This goat seems to exemplify that expression — no matter who said it.

I’m adding it to The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting.

Edublogs has created this video on “What Is A Blog?”

I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Teachers (And Others!) On How To Be Better Bloggers and to My Best Posts For Tech Novices (Plus A Few From Other People).

This is a wonderful video, and great, engaging English practice!

Here’s a very good video I’m adding to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction:

I’ve written in my books and here on my blog how I use the concept of “gratitude” in class (see The Best Resources On “Gratitude”).

My colleague Katie Hull did a simple and powerful lesson using one of the resources on that “Best” list and I thought I’d share it here.

It’s based on an experiment and video that “Soul Pancake’ did (the video is on that list, but I’ve also embedded again in this post).

Katie gave her students this writing prompt (which is very similar to the question used in the video):

Close your eyes and think of somebody who is really influential in your life and/or who matters to you. Why is this person so important?

She also shared what she had written about her father as a model. After students wrote it, and shared in partners, she showed the video. Then, she encouraged people to to share what they wrote with the person they wrote about — in fact, some students felt they wanted to share it right then by calling.

Tears were shed.

You might also be interested in the other 1,200 “The Best…” lists I’ve posted.

June 17, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far

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Here’s the latest in my mid-year“The Best…” posts….

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – So Far:

Jason Flom shared this great video on the importance of making mistakes. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

This demonstrates both the disadvantages of extrinsic motivation and the importance of helping our students develop creativity. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students and to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity:

Here’s a cute video that would be a fun introduction to the lesson on self-control in my book, Helping Students Motivate Themselves (and it could be used with any of the other ideas I share in The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control).

A willingness to take risks is an important quality of a language learner, which is why I’m adding this video to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

Story, Imagery, & the Art of 21st Century Presentation is a very good video of Garr Reynolds on presentation skills. I’m adding it to The Best Digital (& Non-Digital) Storytelling Resources.

Here’s a great video animation created by Scott McLeod where he imagines a conversation between a policy maker and an educator about “teacher accountability.”

I’m adding it to A Collection Of The Best “Laugh While You Cry” Videos.

Dan Pink has posted a nice and short video demonstrating the importance of asking good questions.

I’m adding it to….The Best Videos Showing The Importance Of Asking Good Questions.

You may have heard about the late David Foster Wallace’s amazing commencement address from several years ago at Kenyon College. A video, using his audio, was unveiled on the Web, and has since been seen millions of times. Here’s the video (you can read the transcript here). Here are previous posts where I’ve also highlighted particularly notable commencement addresses:

This TED Talk video from Rita Pierson on “Every Kid Needs A Champion” is a great one. I had never heard of Rita Pierson before, but she makes great points. I wonder how and why she got connected to Ruby Payne? (see The Best Critiques Of Ruby Payne).

I’m adding the video to The Best Resources On The Importance Of Building Positive Relationships With Students.

This is a great entertaining video, and it got me wondering if it could be a model for some class projects — would it make sense for students to create similar videos demonstrating the historical transitions in, let’s say, the rule of law, or how children were treated (or, as one reader suggested, changing scientific beliefs)? You’d want to be very, very careful (and I’d probably avoid it) with using it to examine racial and gender attitudes, but there may very well be other attitudes that would be worth examining. At the very least, the video will offer a few minutes of enjoyable entertainment:

What a great video to help teach “Perception” to IB Theory Of Knowledge students:

Here’s another short video that would be great to teach “perception” in IB Theory of Knowledge classes. Thanks to Michelle Henry for the tip:

The PBS News Hour aired an impressive report on project-based learning in a Kentucky school district. I’m embedding the video below, but it might not come through on an RSS Reader:

Watch School District Uses Project Based Learning Over Testing on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

The report refers to an interesting program in that state called “districts of innovation. You can read more about them here and here.

I’m adding this info to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas and to The Best Articles Describing Alternatives To High-Stakes Testing.

The Anti-Defamation League has launched an “Imagine a World Without Hate” video and action campaign with the posting of this pretty amazing video. It can be used in many ways, including as part of a “what if?” history lesson. That’s why I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons:

Rick Wormeli shared these two very useful videos of education researcher John Hattie:

I’m adding this excellent video on how African men are stereotyped in Hollywood movies to The Best Geography Sites For Learning About Africa. It’ll be a great way to also get my ESL students to start talking about how they feel their cultures have also been stereotyped.

The wonderful StoryCorps stories on NPR are great pieces to read and listen to on the radio. They also have converted a number of them into short video animations, and many of them (though not the one I’ve embedded below) are closed-captioned.

Here is one of my favorites — with the late, great Studs Terkel:

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality:

The well-regarded documentary The Finland Phenomenon is now online for free and is embedded below. I learned about its availability via a tweet by Pasi Sahlberg, which also included a radio interview. I’m adding it to The Best Resources To Learn About Finland’s Education System.

The Gates Foundation  released a new one of Hans Rosling’s “magic” world data videos (you can see his previous ones I’ve posted here). Check it out:

The eagle in this video certainly illustrates an example of perseverance. I’m adding it to The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner:

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

NASA released this video showing temperature changes in the world since 1880 and including 2012 — it’s an updated version of one they’ve released in previous years. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

What A Great Video To Show The Importance Of Modeling & Support:

Dan Pink was interviewed on CBS, and it really gets at some key elements of motivation and goal-setting. There’s nothing new there for people familiar with his work, but it’s a great piece to show to colleagues and to students. I’ve embedded it below, though am not sure if it will show-up in an RSS Reader:

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students and to The Best Posts On Students Setting Goals.

Eduardo Briceño is the Co-Founder, with Dr. Carol Dweck, of Mindset Works:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

I wouldn’t put this next video in the same class as the other ones on this list, but I think readers might still find it useful. Eye On Education, the publisher of my new books on student motivation, Helping Students Motivate Themselves and Self-Driven Learning, have just posted a short video clip from a webinar I did for them.

In it, I share three strategies that can help students develop intrinsic motivation:

Feedback is welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to look at the 1,100 other “The Best…” lists and consider subscribing to this blog for free.

December 5, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Even More Population Resources

Here are the newest additions to The Best Resources For Learning About Our World’s Population Of 7 Billion:

Explore your world is an amazing interactive. Here’s how it describes itself:

We live in a world of 7 billion people, living in seven continents and more than 200 countries. Though family size (fertility) continues to decline in most places, our numbers are projected to rise for years to come. This dashboard allows you to take a closer look at the world population in 2011 and beyond: Check out populations by region or country. Look at the proportion of young and old. See what various paths the future population growth may take.

Population Control, Marauder Style is a really interesting infographic from The New York Times.

World population still growing, but slowing is an historical interactive from the CBC.

Hans Rosling on global population growth is a TED Talk

October 26, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

The Best Resources For Learning About Our World’s Population Of 7 Billion

Countries_by_population_density.svg

The seven billionth person in the world is projected to be born on Monday, and I thought that this event called for a “The Best…” list.

Here are my choices for The Best Resources For Learning About Our World’s Population Of 7 Billion:

A global push to 7 billion people is a Washington Post interactive.

Explore Your World is an amazing interactive. Here’s an explanation of it.

The World at 7 Billion is a special TIME Magazine report.

The World Of Seven Billion is from National Geographic.

7 billion: World’s population reaches new milestone is an Associated Press interactive.

Population Seven Billion is a photo gallery from The Atlantic.

Population to Hit 7 Bllion on Halloween is from Breaking News English.

How big was the world’s population when you were born? is an interactive from The Guardian.

Fear of a 7 Billion Population Planet is from The Atlantic.

The upsides of overpopulation is from The Washington Post.

The buzz behind 7 billion people: A milestone and a warning is from CNN.

Country Population: Past, Present, Future
is another interactive from The Guardian.

How the world population got to 7 billion – interactive is yet another interactive from The Guardian, and I think it’s particularly interesting.

World Population: 7 Billion is a photo gallery from The Boston Globe.

The world at seven billion is a fascinating interactive from the BBC, which includes the option of figuring out which “number” you were in that 7 billion.

The making of 7 billion is a Washington Post slideshow.

Visualizing How A Population Grows To 7 Billion is from NPR.

Well, Hello There, Seven Billion is a Wall Street Journal slideshow.

The World’s Top 50, Over Time is an interactive chart from the Journal projecting how different countries population is projected to change over the next fifty years.

Crowded Planet is a special feature from The Guardian.

Picturing 7 Billion is from The New York Times.

Making Sense of 7 Billion People is from Wired.

Bringing Up the Issue of Population Growth is from The New York Times.

World Population Hits 7 Billion is an interactive from USA Today.

We are 7 billion is a video from The Economist.

Who Is The World’s Seve Billionth Person? is a TIME slideshow.

Feeding 7 billion and our fragile environment is a photo gallery from The Boston Globe.

Explore your world is an amazing interactive. Here’s how it describes itself:

We live in a world of 7 billion people, living in seven continents and more than 200 countries. Though family size (fertility) continues to decline in most places, our numbers are projected to rise for years to come. This dashboard allows you to take a closer look at the world population in 2011 and beyond: Check out populations by region or country. Look at the proportion of young and old. See what various paths the future population growth may take.

Population Control, Marauder Style is a really interesting infographic from The New York Times.

World population still growing, but slowing is an historical interactive from the CBC.

Hans Rosling on global population growth is a TED Talk.

Pictured: A World at 7 Billion is an amazing New York Times project.

Do the dead outnumber the living? is from The BBC.

I’ve previously shared videos of Hans Rosling, data magician.

He has a new TED Talk out, and it’s called Religions and Babies. I’m embedding it below:

Beyond 7 billion is a pretty impressive interactive from The Los Angeles Times.

World Population Data Sheet 2013
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Young Vs Old: Which Countries Have The Youngest Populations? is an interactive from Radio Free Europe.

2014 World Population Digital Visualization

Feedback and additional suggestions are welcome.

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You might also want to explore the 800 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

April 3, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

March’s Best Tweets — Part Two (A Few Days Late)

Every month I make a short list highlighting my choices of the best resources I shared through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog. Now and then, in order to make it a bit easier for me, I may try to break it up into mid-month and end-of-month lists (and sometimes I’m a bit late).

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in this post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page or subscribe to their RSS feed.

Here are my picks for March’s Best Tweets — Part Two (not listed in any order):

What the now-found Bronx zoo cobra tweeted, NY Times

“Pay-4-Performance: Individual vs. Group Incentives” by Larry Cuban

“There are encouraging signs that the right’s war on labor is backfiring” Salon

“research finds a shift in emphasis in pop song lyrics over the decades, from “we” to “me.”

Impressive slavery interactive

Guide to Clouds, NY Times slideshow

“NCELA Quarterly Review: Spring 2011 – English Learners with Special Needs”

“Gadgets You Should Get Rid Of (or Not)” NY Times

“Hans Rosling and the magic washing machine” new TED Talk

LEGO Comic Builder

Famous Inboxes (Thanks to Stephen Davis for the tip)

You might also be interested in seeing a list of favorite tweets at:

Shelly Terrell’s blog

Kalinago English

Eye On Education

December 16, 2010
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

Yesterday, I posted The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010.

Today, I’d like to share “Part Two,” which includes videos that didn’t quite “make the cut,” but which I think readers will find useful, anyway. In addition, this list includes some clips that weren’t actually produced in 2010, but which I learned about this year.

Here are my choices for Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010:

Ellen Galinsky has created a great new video titled “Focus And Self Control” on the famous “marshmallow” test. You can read how I have used this in classroom at my previous post, “I Like This Lesson Because It Make Me Have a Longer Temper” (Part One).

There are two things that make this video stand-out (it’s a nice compliment to the one I’ve used in the past). One, it shows Dr. Walter Mischel, the originator of the experiment, actually saying what the long-term implications of the test might be. Since students read about him in the lesson, it will have a double impact. Secondly, the video shows a fun “reverse Simon Sez” activity designed to help children develop self-control skills. It’s obviously designed for small children, but I’m sure even high school students would enjoy doing it for a few minutes after they see the video.

The only existing moving images of Anne Frank were discovered this year. It’s only a few seconds but, if you’re studying her in class, just showing that she was truly a living and breathing person can have an impact on students.

Here’s how Mashable describes it: At the 9 second mark in the clip, you can see Anne Frank leaning out of a second-story window as she watches a bride and groom exit a neighboring address. The Guardian reports that the scene dates back to July 22, 1941 and was provided to the museum by the couple in the 1990s.

Nature By The Numbers is an incredible video “inspired on numbers, geometry and nature”:

This year, I watched the movie “Dangerous Minds” (I might have been one of the few teachers out there who hadn’t seen it earlier). It’s an engaging movie, but it’s one in a long line of nauseatingly paternalistic hero teacher films out there. However, it does have a great two minute clip of a teacher home visit that shows the importance of telling parents positive news about their children:

Volkswagen sponsors a site that shows videos designed to encourage people to do activities that promote social good by making them fun — an idea that all of us teachers might want to keep in mind. You can see all of them at The Fun Theory, and here’s the one that started it off:

Will Richardson highlighted this short clip from the movie “Apollo 13.” You couldn’t find a better one that would show what problem-based learning was all about:

I suspect many people saw “Famous Failures” before I did this year, and it’s a good one:

And everybody has got to see Hans Rosling’s 200 Countries, 200 Years, 4 Minutes:

As a bonus, two years ago Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach wrote an excellent post including this extraordinary video on John Dewey and progressive education:

Additional contributions are welcome!

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You might also want to explore the nearly 600 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.