Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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SAS Curriculum Pathways Introduces A Ton Of New Free Activities

 

SAS Curriculum Pathways, my favorite online site (see I Really Like How SAS Curriculum Pathways Site Incorporates Knowledge Transfer In Social Studies and SAS Curriculum Pathways, Just About The Best Online Ed Site, Has Gotten Even Better…) has just unveiled a ton of new free online interactives.

The new exercises are for just about every subject, and they’re too numerous to list here. You can see them all here.

The only negative is now I’ve got to take time and add a bunch more links to them in our class blogs 🙂

February 20, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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I Really Like How SAS Curriculum Pathways Site Incorporates Knowledge Transfer In Social Studies

I’ve often written about how much I like SAS Curriculum Pathways, a free site with tons of interactive lessons that students can complete and then email to their teacher.

One particularly impressive feature they’ve added to a number of their U.S. History lessons is a task where students have to apply what they learned to a different fictional scenario. They talk about it in a blog post as an element of Bloom’s Taxonomy “apply” level, and it’s also an opportunity for students to “transfer” their knowledge (see The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More). More specifically, it’s an example of “near transfer” (applying knowledge to a similar situation) as opposed to “far transfer” (applying it in a substantially different arena).

If you’d like to learn more about transfer, check out the previously-mentioned “Best” list, as well as an excerpt from one of my books that appeared in The Washington Post, The real stuff of schooling: How to teach students to apply knowledge.

I’ll also be publishing a series on the topic later this spring at my Education Week Teacher column, which will include an experiment they’re doing – an animated video explaining the issue.

August 4, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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SAS Curriculum Pathways, Just About The Best Online Ed Site, Has Gotten Even Better…

sassas

I’ve previously written a lot about how much I like SAS Curriculum Pathways, a free site with tons of interactive lessons that students can complete and then email to their teacher.

It’s just gotten even better….

One, today they unveiled a big upgrade to the design of their site, and it looks great.

Secondly, they have a nice new feature called Explore Primary Sources, which provides lots of creative lessons for students to access…primary sources.

August 6, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two Great Sites – SAS Curriculum Pathways & Awesome Stories – Upgrading Big Time This Month

'Awesome' photo (c) 2012, Sam Howzit - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I have posted often about two of my favorite sites, SAS Curriculum Pathways and Awesome Stories. They’re both free and are on more of my “The Best…” lists than you can shake a stick at.

And they’re both getting even better this month….

SAS Curriculum Pathways has added a bunch of new activities that I’m looking forward to using with both my ELL and mainstream students. You can read one of my previous posts about it to learn a little more.

Awesome Stories will be unveiling their new website later this month (here’s one of my previous posts about them). Here’s what they say it will include:

New Functionality Launching in August:

Teacher Portal

Student Portal

Standards-based Search

Advanced subject, grade Search

Teacher Accounts linked to Student Accounts

Teacher Assignment, Grading, Communication

Assignable CCSS “Tasks” linked to Story Chapters

Teacher Class Reports

School Reports

District Reports

Great stuff!

October 19, 2011
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“SAS Curriculum Pathways” Looks Like A Winner

Earlier this evening, Mary Ann Zehr, formerly a reporter with Education Week and now a high school ESL teacher in Washington, D.C., sent a tweet recommending something called SAS Curriculum Pathways for history resources.

Since I have always respected Mary Ann’s judgement, I immediately checked it out.

And I’m impressed.

It has a huge amount of interactives in all subjects. In many of them, students complete the activity online, and then send their work electronically to their teacher (it can also be printed out).

Before I continue, I should also mention that it’s free…

I really don’t know who SAS is (I didn’t have time to investigate), but they have set this system up so it’s free to educators and their students. The teacher signs-up and is give a log-in name for all the students in a school. It doesn’t appear that students need their own individual log-in because they have to type in their name before beginning any activity. Let me tell you, that will make using this site immeasurably easy — students won’t have to remember — or forget — individual passwords!

Since I’m teaching US History this year, I mainly focused on those sites, and they looked pretty good and accessible to ELL’s with audio support for the text. The site, though, has resources for all subjects.

In my quick review of the US History sites, they all appeared engaging, though primarily geared to lower-levels of thinking, primarily comprehension and recall. But since I use the Web generally as a reinforcement tool, that works fine for me.

Let me know if you’re familiar with SAS or, if you are just starting out with it, what you think of their other activities.

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About U.S. History.

October 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post or two containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles (& Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2016 – Part Two andThe Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s picks:

10 Ways to Teach Argument-Writing With The New York Times is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For Helping Students Learn To Write Persuasive Essays.

Dangers of (starting with) definitions is from The Science Teacher and offers helpful advice about vocabulary instruction. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

How Teachers And Schools Can Help When Bad Stuff Happens is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Talking With Children About Tragedies.

SAS Curriculum Pathways, one of my favorite online sites, offers a free Math 1 course. You can read more about it here.

USING THE DO NOW FOR RETRIEVAL PRACTICE–AN UPDATE FROM ALEX LANEY is from Doug Lemov. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For “Do Now” Activities To Begin A Class.

Math Class Doesn’t Work. Here’s the Solution is by Jo Boaler and appeared in TIME.

In History Projects, Point of View & Context Matter is a very good piece by Anthony Cody on project-based learning in Social Science classes. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

Resources for Teaching and Learning About the Las Vegas Shooting is from The New York Times Learning Network.

Island in Crisis: Teaching About Puerto Rico After Hurricane Maria is also from The NY Times Learning Network.

RETRIEVAL PRACTICE: A TEACHERS’ DEFINITION AND VIDEO EXAMPLES is from Doug Lemov.

August 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Five Most Popular Posts Of The Week

Here’s the latest edition of this regular feature . These are the posts appearing this blog that received the most “hits” in the preceding seven days (though they may have originally been published on an earlier date).

You might also be interested in Most Popular Posts From This Blog In 2017 – So Far; Tenth Anniversary Of This Blog — What Have Been My Most Popular Posts? (Part One) and Part Two: Tenth Anniversary Of This Blog — What Have Been My Most Popular Posts?

Here are this week’s top posts:

1. Answers To “What Do You Do On The First Day Of School?”

2. SAS Curriculum Pathways Introduces A Ton Of New Free Activities

3. Quizlet Gets Even Better – You Can Now Create “Interactive Diagrams”

4. Teacher Creates “Hurricane Harvey Book Club” Facebook Page Of Kids & Adults Reading Books

5. The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures

August 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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August’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

I regularly highlight my picks for the most useful posts for each month — not including “The Best…” lists. I also use some of them in a more extensive monthly newsletter I send-out. You can see older Best Posts of the Month at Websites Of The Month (more recent lists can be found here).

You can also see my all-time favorites here. I’ve also been doing “A Look Back” series in recognition of this blog’s tenth anniversary this past February.

Here are some of the posts I personally think are the best, and most helpful, ones I’ve written during this past month (not in any order of preference). There are a lot of them this month:

SAS Curriculum Pathways Introduces A Ton Of New Free Activities

“Playbuzz” Has Become A Remarkably Versatile Free Tool For Creating Online Games & Presentations

Quizlet Gets Even Better – You Can Now Create “Interactive Diagrams”

Great Lesson Idea – What Would You Put On Voyager’s “Golden Record”?

“Q & A Collections: Advice For New Teachers”

A Look Back: “We Should Be Obsessed With Racial Equity”

A Look Back: “Here’s My Entire ELL Beginners Seven-Week Unit On Writing A Story (Including Hand-outs & Links)”

Banning Racism With As Much Enthusiasm As Banning Fidget Spinners

Important Advice For White Educators (& Others)

“Don’t Be A Sucker”: Anti-Fascist Video Made By U.S. Military In 1943 Relevant Today

Video: “What to do when you realize classic books from your childhood are racist”

Q & A Collections: Differentiating Instruction

“Time-Travel” With Merriam-Webster To Learn When Words Entered The English Language

Statistic Of The Day: Yes, We Teachers Buy A Lot Of Food For Our Students To Eat

Very Interesting: The Most Important Letters In History

“Writing Sparks” Could Be A Useful Online Writing Tool

Resources For Spanish-Speakers Not Literate In Their Home Language

Eight Free Downloadable Children’s Books In Khmer – More On The Way (Maybe In Other Languages, Too)

New Study Finds VAM Is Biased Against Teachers Of “At Risk” Students

“The Platinum Rule” Is A Key To Effective Differentiation

Good Advice On Talking About Our Colleagues & Our Students

Extrinsic Motivation Strikes Out Again

Guest Post: “Co-Teaching Dos and Don’ts”

Ways To Encourage Our Students To Get Through “The Last Mile”

Guest Post: “PD in your Pjs: How to navigate #EllChat_BkClub on Twitter”

Good Video Showing How NOT To Manage A Classroom

New Study Finds That People Like You More If You Ask Questions

Interesting NY Times Interactive Shows What Occupations Share Similar Skills With Teaching

 

 

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