Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

March 10, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

We learn about the scientific method in IB Theory of Knowledge classes, and especially talk about its application in all areas of life – not just science. I’ve previously posted about this topic, and thought readers might find it useful to see some of the videos I use, depending on the time available. Feel free to suggest more!

Here’s another version:

March 12, 2012
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

First Grader Makes Rube Goldberg Machine (& Explicitly Connects It To Scientific Method)

A first grader created a Rube Goldberg Machine. That in itself makes this a neat video to watch. The “kicker,” though, is that he makes some explicit connections to the scientific method, too. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Rube Goldberg Machines.

June 22, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Using The Scientific Method In English & Social Studies

I’ve often used the scientific method in my English and Social Studies classes — both with English Language Learners and with mainstream students.

The MCREL blog just posted a nice related piece titled Generating and Testing Hypotheses is Not Just for Science that’s a good short read.

October 13, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – Part Two

 

This is the first in my annual year-end “Best” lists (you can find all 1,700 Best lists here).

In addition, you can find All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part One ; The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner ; The Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators ; The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More ; The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More! ;  The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More ; The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” and The Best Videos For Teaching & Learning About Figurative Language.

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Showing Good & Bad Classroom Discussions

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos About The Importance Of Practice – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos Explaining Gravitational Waves (In An Accessible Way)

The Best Random Acts Of Kindness Videos

The Best Videos For Learning About Civil Disobedience

The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

I’ve also written a guest post for Edutopia titled 5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Videos for ELL Classrooms. You might find it useful.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – Part Two (some may have been produced prior to this year, but are just new to me):

I know that many educators have read the book “Made To Stick,” by by Chip Heath and Dan Heath.

Here’s a nice summary of it:

A brief history of banned numbers is a new lesson and video from TED-Ed.

Its content reminded me of when the then-military dictatorship governing Argentina banned the use of Venn Diagrams in school. You can read more about that story at The Best Multimedia Resources For Introducing Students To The Advantages Of Charts, Graphs & Infographics.

The PBS News Hour did this video segment interviewing Angie Thomas, the author of the amazing book, The Hate You Give:

I’m adding this brand-new StoryCorps animated video to The Best Resources To Learn About The Vietnam War.

Here’s how they describe it:

After being drafted in 1969, Tom Geerdes served as an Army medic in the 11th Armored Cavalry in Vietnam and Cambodia. Like many veterans, he returned home a changed man. At StoryCorps, Tom shared his long journey toward healing with his daughter, Hannah Campbell.

Space X released a blooper rule of their past failures.

You can see the original here, but I like this edited version from Tech Insider better because it provides more context:

I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

TED-Ed has published this lesson and video. I’m adding it to:

The Best Videos Documenting The History Of The English Language

You might also be interested in The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2016.

Teaching Adolescents to Become Learners: The Role of Noncognitive Factors in Shaping School Performance is an important report that The University of Chicago Consortium on School Research issued a few years ago.

It’s on The Best Summaries/Reviews Of Research On Social Emotional Learning – Let Me Know What I’ve Missed list.

More recently, though, they created this three minute summary of the report’s results. It’s well done and is worth viewing:

Noncognitive Factors from UChicago UEI on Vimeo.

I’m adding this new video from NPR to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

The last part of that list has resources specifically focused on the need for more teachers of color.

A short clip from this video has been making the rounds on social media recently.

I could definitely see showing the first six minutes in class and asking students to reflect on how it might, and might not, connect to events that we are experiencing today.

Here’s a description of the video:

Don’t Be a Sucker! is a short educational film produced by the U.S. War Department in 1943 and re-released in 1947. The film depicts the rise of Nazism in Germany and warns Americans against repeating the mistakes of intolerance made in Nazi Germany. It emphasizes that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into “suckers” by the forces of fanaticism and hatred.

You can read more about the film at this Atlantic article about it.

 

The PBS News Hour included this commentary from author Grace Lin.

I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

Here’s a nice video from Jo Boaler on a growth mindset and its impact on the brain. It specifically talks about math, but would be useful in any subject.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”

The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning

Harry Fletcher-Wood shared this video on Twitter.

I’m adding it to The Best Funny Movie/TV Clips Of Bad Teachers.

I think this is a simple and neat video.

I’m wondering if English Language Learner students could somehow apply this same idea to representing words they are learning? If so, how? What video-creation tool would work? What do readers think?

Words from Enle Li on Vimeo.

I’m adding this new video to The Best Sites To Learn About Street Gangs:

TED-Ed has released this video (and lesson) perfect for IB Theory of Knowledge classes (and for a lot of other courses, too):

ELL teacher Valentina Gonzalez created this video.

Here’s how she describes it:

This video demonstrates instruction that is made comprehensible and instruction that is not comprehensible. The demo uses a different language so viewers can feel what an EL may experience in the classroom.

I think any teacher who has an English Language Learner in his/her class can benefit from watching it. I’ll certainly be using it in the ELL Methods class I teacher in University teacher education programs.

I’m adding it to The Best Videos For Content Teachers With ELLs In Their Classes – Please Suggest More.

I’ve written several posts about the “constraints principle” and how I use it in the classroom (see The “Constraints Principle” Revisited).

TED-Ed unveiled a new lesson and video related to this idea.

I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity.

Thanks to Renee Moore, I learned about the video of a 1967 address Martin Luther King, Jr. gave to junior high school students in Philadelphia.

It’s titled “What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” and I haven’t been able to find a full transcript on line.  Here’s a very partial one, but much is missing.  A full transcript apparently is available in a book.

It’s impressive, to say the least, and would be very useful in class:

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King.

June 4, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2017 – So Far

 

I’ve created a public Twitter list of IB Theory of Knowledge teachers. Send a tweet to me letting me know you’re an IB teacher, or leave a comment on this post, and I’ll add you to the list!

It’s time for another “Best” list to add to All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place.

I’ll also be adding this post to All Of My Theory Of Knowledge “Best” Lists In One Place!

Here are my previous TOK-related “Best” lists:

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources — 2010

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – So Far

The Best Commentaries On The New IB Theory Of Knowledge Teaching Guide

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Movies For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes – What Are Your Suggestions?

The Best Posts On IB Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Posts On Teaching TOK “Knowledge Questions”

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2016 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2016 – Part Two

Here are my picks from the past six months:

Read, Listen, Watch New Orleans Mayor’s Speech On The Removal Of Confederate Monuments

This new PBS News Hour segment would be great for an IB Theory of Knowledge class or any Social Studies course to initiate a discussion of what is worth remembering/memorializing and for what reason:

“History does not move on the machinations of a select group of great people”

The Best Resources For Learning About Cognitive Bias

This is a very interesting short video.

It would be useful in IB Theory of Knowledge class when we examine math and statistics.

And it would also be helpful in science classes.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

Here’s an excellent and practical interpretation of IB’s rubric for the Theory of Knowledge oral presentation (I’m adding it to The Best Posts On IB Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations):

Speaking of IB Theory of Knowledge Oral Presentations, this is a video of Michelle’s presentation. She’s given me permission to share it here.

I’m giving her a 7 on the (in my opinion) somewhat weird IB Presentation Rubric.

What do you think? (by the way, you can find all our class materials on the Oral Presentation, including many other videos, here).

I’m adding this new video to our Theory of Knowledge class blog post exploring Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. That post also includes student-created videos of modern versions of the Allegory:

3 ways to spot a bad statistic is the title of data journalist Mona Chalabi’s new TED Talk (you can see the TED Talk video and transcript here).

I think it would be fine to skip the first few minutes of it, but after the first five minutes she does a great job teaching about how statistics can mislead. Even better, she includes examples related to pee and poop, so you know students are going to be engaged 🙂

It would be great to show IB Theory of Knowledge classes when studying math and/or human sciences.

Here’s the YouTube version of the talk:

Richard Byrne, who I assume everybody who is reading this blog knows and reads, shared this video last month. He wrote about using it when teaching about social media browsing.

I plan on adding it to a series of videos I use in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when learning about perception.

You can see all those videos at Videos: Here’s The Simple Theory of Knowledge Lesson On Perception I Did Today.

TOK and “fake news”: 3 tips, 2 downloads, and 3 resources is a helpful resource for Theory of Knowledge and other classes. I’m adding it to The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy – Help Me Find More.

I might be the last person in the world to learn about the “Google Explore” feature that was integrated into Google Docs last fall. You can read all about it here. There’s a little button on the bottom right of a Google Doc. Click on it and, as you write, related search items appear in a column. My Theory of Knowledge students found it useful while working on their Oral Presentation outlines and essays.

Here Are Some Of The Knowledge Questions My TOK Students Are Using For Oral Presentations This Year

The Simple “New Paradigm Project” We Did In Theory Of Knowledge Class (& Which Could Be Done In Other Classes, Too)

Four New Resources On Indigenous Peoples

New Study: The Milgram Experiment Is Replicated

Exemplar Slideshows For Our “Ways Of Knowing” Project

I’m adding this new video from Wireless Philosophy to The Best Online Resources For Teaching The Difference Between Correlation & Causation:

The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

Here’s My Absolutism/Relativism Project For TOK – Help Me Make It Better

New “What If?” History Presentations

“What If?” History Projects

Though I’ve not been a fan of all of Derek Sivers’ videos (see my article, Dancing Guy Doesn’t Teach Good Leadership Lessons), I like this short one that Jen Adkins, my talented colleague at school, showed me this year.

It was made in 2009, but I don’t remember seeing it before.  I think it would be useful in many situations, including IB Theory of Knowledge classes:

Why cute baby animal photos are actually toying with your brainfrom The Washington Post is great for use in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when studying perception.

Play-Doh & IB Theory Of Knowledge: Student Hand-Out & Videos

TED-Ed has just released a new lesson and video on the famous Trolley Problem.

The Trolley Problem, of course, is a key part of any discussion of Ethics in an IB Theory of Knowledge classroom, which is why I have a The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” list.

When we study Perception in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes, I ask students how they would describe the color red to someone who has never had vision. This new video just was published:

Here’s a new and short video on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

I’m not sure if it’s necessary to use a video to teach the Hierarchy, but it could be a nice change-of-pace. Most Theory of Knowledge include it in the course, particularly when covering Human Sciences.

May 21, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – So Far

Time for another mid-year “Best” list.

I’ll be adding this post to All Mid-Year 2017 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2015

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – Part Two

The “All-Time” Best Science Sites

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Science Sites Of 2011

The Best Science Sites Of 2011 — So Far

The Best Science Websites — 2010

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009

The Best Science & Math Websites — 2008

The Best Science Websites For Students & Teachers — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – So Far (not in any order of preference):

NPR has just announced their first show geared towards kids – a science podcast called “Wow In The World.” Here’s how they describe it:

NPR is thrilled to announce the launch of Wow in the World, a new podcast for kids ages 5-12 that illuminates the wonders of science, technology, discovery and inventions….Starting May 15, NPR’s Guy Raz and SiriusXM’s Mindy Thomas will take kids and their grown-ups on a journey into the most incredible science and kid-friendly news stories of the week.

One would think it could also have potential for use in the classroom.

The Best Resources On The Cassini Spacecraft

Here are two new (to me) sites providing very accessible science resources to teachers and students:

Reachout Reporter (you can learn more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog)

Young Person’s Trust For the Environment (you can more about it at TopMarks).

Apollo 13 Explosion Occurred On This Day In 1970 – Here’s The Story Behind The “Hack” That Saved Them

Legends of Learning is a new site that provides custom-built games organized by learning objectives. Teachers can create “playlists” they want their students to access and then monitor their progress. They only have science-related games right now, but plan on adding more related to other subjects soon. You can read more about it at USA Today’s article, ‘Spotify for learning games’ coming to classrooms, and I’ve embedded a video about the site at the bottom of this post. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress It appears the site is free for a month or so after registration (longer if you have fewer students) and then you have to review games, perform other services for the site, or pay per student.

The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Space & Planets

“How small are we in the scale of the universe?” is the title of a new TED-Ed video and lesson.

I’m adding it to The Best Web Tools That Show You Objects To Scale.

Vanishing: The Extinction Crisis Is Far Worse Than You Think is an important – and depressing – new CNN multimedia interactive. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For World Biodiversity Day (& Endangered Species Day).

 

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