Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

October 19, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New & Absolutely Delightful Playing For Change Music Video: “Everyday People”

I’ve often shared videos from Playing For Change.

They just released a new one that is absolutely delightful.

Here’s how they describe it:

We are proud and honored to reshare this video, produced by Playing For Change in partnership with Turnaround Arts.

Turnaround Arts infuses struggling schools with arts as a strategy for reform. The program was founded by President Obama’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities and is now run by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Turnaround Arts currently works in 73 schools, 38 districts, and 17 states and the District of Columbia.

“Everyday People” features Turnaround Arts students alongside their Turnaround Artists including Jack Johnson, Jason Mraz, Paula Abdul, Misty Copeland, Elizabeth Banks, Keb’ Mo, Forest Whitaker,and many more performing this timely song by Sly and the Family Stone.

This video was created to inspire the idea that all children deserve access to the arts in school and that the arts have the power to create change.

Learn more about Turnaround Arts at http://turnaroundarts.kennedy-center.org

October 19, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – Part Two

 

Time for another end-of-year “Best” list.

I’m adding this post to All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

You might also be interested in:

The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2015

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – Part Two

The “All-Time” Best Science Sites

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Science Sites Of 2011

The Best Science Sites Of 2011 — So Far

The Best Science Websites — 2010

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009

The Best Science & Math Websites — 2008

The Best Science Websites For Students & Teachers — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Science Sites Of 2017 – Part Two (not in any order of preference) – these also include new science-related “Best” lists:

The Best Resources For Learning About The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

The Best Sites Where Students Can Ask Science Questions & Receive Responses

NASA Space Place is good site sponsored by…NASA. It has lots of very accessible info about all things space-related and, with a click on the globe on the top right of the English or Spanish page, it will take you to the version in the other language. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Planets & Space. I’m also adding it to The Best Multilingual & Bilingual Sites For Math, Social Studies, & Science.

A couple of years ago, The NY Times published an excellent climate change “explainer” – a list of questions about it with short and simple answers. They’ve just put a band-new, updated and more attractive interactive version headlined Climate Change Is Complex. We’ve Got Answers to Your Questions. I think it’s perfect for classrooms. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

The BBC has launched Grand Challenges II to examine what they consider the major problems facing the world. It seems like it could be a very useful resource for teachers and students. You can read their announcement here. It’s an ongoing series, and they’ll be regularly updating all their new reports here. As I mentioned, this project is called “Grand Challenges II.” Earlier this year, they published Grand Challenges I, which seems to me to have the same purpose as this second edition. Grand Challenges I has lots of related interactive content.

It’s been forty years since the Voyager spacecraft were launched, and there has been a lot of coverage about the anniversary (see The Best Sites For Learning About Voyager 1 & Its Departure From Our Solar System).

The New Yorker has come out with several features, but their most intriguing one was an invitation to readers to share their nominations of what should go on a Golden Record today:

If a second Voyager mission were launching next week, what mementos of Earth would it contain? How would we represent our past, our present, and our hopes for the future? In short, what would a Golden Record look like in 2017?

They want readers to share specific recommendations about “sights, sounds and everything else.” I think this has the potential of being an excellent lesson for IB Theory of Knowledge classes when we study language.

And, speaking of Voyager, I’m adding this new video from Vox to The Best Sites For Learning About Voyager 1 & Its Departure From Our Solar System:

I’m adding this new National Geographic video to The Best Sites For Learning About Planets & Space:

I’m adding this neat new video from NASA to The Best Resources On The Cassini Spacecraft:

This is a wild and depressing interactive called “Temperature anomalies arranged by country 1900 – 2016.” It was created by Antti Lipponen and you can read more about here. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change:

Temperature anomalies arranged by country 1900 - 2016.

Google Street View now lets you explore every nook-and-cranny of the International Space Station. You can read about it at TechCrunch and see the video below. I’m adding this info to The Best Sites For Learning About The International Space Station.

Here’s the description of this next video:

Motion Designer Christian worked with his brother and Composer Wolfgang for 18 months on this shortfilm. The foundation were thousands original NASA photographies, taken from the Astronauts during the Apollo Missions, which were released in September 2015. It is an animated collage using different techniques to bring the stills to life.

I’m adding it to The Best Images Taken In Space.

LUNAR from Christian Stangl on Vimeo.

Thanks to Sara K. Ahmed and Katherine Williams, I learned about a series of short videos from National Geographic called “Today I Learned.” They all seem to be two minutes or less on a variety of topics. You can access them all on the National Geographic website or a playlist on its channel on YouTube. I’m not sure, though, if the YouTube channel has all of them.

Here’s an example:

October 19, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Pins Of The Week

pinsoftheweek

I’m fairly active on Pinterest and, in fact, have curated over 12,000 resources there that I haven’t shared on this blog.

I thought readers might find it useful if I began sharing a handful of my most recent “pins” each week (I’m not sure if you can see them through an RSS Reader – you might have to click through to the original post). The first one is my “most popular” one:

October 18, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: “Look Inside One of the World’s Most Colorful Cemeteries”

I’m adding this new National Geographic video to The Best Sites For International Day Of The World’s Indigenous People.

Here’s how they describe it:

Visit the colorful cemetery of Chichicastenango, Guatemala, where every year families repaint the graves of their departed loved ones. To outsiders, the passionate display of color may seem incongruent with loss of life—but according to indigenous Maya tradition, honoring the dead encourages the living to make peace with the inevitability of death.

October 18, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Study Questions Whether Standardized Tests Assess Learning Or Engagement

I’ve previously written about research finding that at least 15 percent, and possibly as much as 30 percent, of a test taker’s success could depend on his or her motivation and other ambiguous factors.

Now new research seems to bolster that position.

Student test engagement and its impact on achievement gap estimates is the headline of an article at Brookings by Jim Soland.

Here’s an excerpt:

He goes on to suggest that there may be an “engagement gap” as well as an “achievement gap.” It’s definitely worth reading the entire short post.

Between this issue and recent questions about how student proficiency with tech affects the new online test scores (see Study: Do Tests On Computers Assess Academic or Technological Abilities?), it seems like there are even more questions about how accurate test scores are for assessing student academic progress.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing

Best Posts On How To Prepare For Standardized Tests (And Why They’re Bad)

The Best Posts On Study Finding That Standardized Tests Don’t Measure Cognitive Ability

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