Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

October 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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October’s (2014) Best Tweets — Part Four

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2014 — So Far.

October 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Character Education: A Cautionary Note”

Brookings has just published a collection titled Essays On Character and Opportunity.

I haven’t got a chance to review them all, but I did read — and liked — Mike Rose’s piece titled “Character Education: A Cautionary Note.”

Here’s an excerpt:

rose

I’m adding this info to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources and to The Best Articles About The Study Showing Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough.

October 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I’ve recently begin a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2013). I also sometimes include tech tools that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

We Top Ten is a simple list-making tool that can be used for books, movies and other items. You can’t leave commentary on your list, but can do so in the comments (which aren’t moderated). It’s easy to use, though, and you can create some nice-looking lists, so it may be worth looking at….

The Edublogs Reader is a handy tool that lets you search all the Edublog-hosted blogs.

ELT Jam offers a list of useful Microsoft Word “hacks.”

Facebook has just unveiled a new app called “Rooms” that lets you easily create a discussion board on a topic of your choice. It’s only accessible via a mobile device, and it’s unclear to me if a room can be made private, but it certainly has made quite a splash. Here are some articles about it:

Facebook’s Rooms App Is a Flashback to Internet Bulletin Boards is from The New York Times.

Facebook Launches Pseudonymous App “Rooms” That Lets You Create Forums About Any Topic is from TechCrunch.

Facebook Takes A Stab At Anonymity With Rooms is from Read Write.

October 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video Of The Month (If Not The Year): “That Came Natural — I Had To Work To Read”

Bill Ferriter, whose blog has been one of the few on my blog roll for many years (and it should be in your RSS Reader, too), recently shared this video.

I suspect this video will be played far-and-wide among English (and other subject) classrooms (it sure received lots of retweets on Twitter). It’s about a star football player’s engagement with reading.

I’m adding it to The Best Videos & Articles Where Athletes Explain How Reading & Writing Well Has Helped Their Career.

October 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Resources From All My Blogs

In addition to this blog, I regularly post at several other sites:

Engaging Parents In School:

Larry Ferlazzo's Engaging Parents in School Site
Weekly Posts At Classroom Q & A With Larry Ferlazzo:

Monthly Posts At The New York Times Learning Network on Teaching English Language Learners:

New York Times Learning Network
Periodic Posts at Edutopia:

Edutopia
Monthly Posts At The British Council – Teaching English

All My Class Blogs:

October 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“We’re hooked on easy answers and undervalue asking good questions”

“Google makes us all dumber: The neuroscience of search engines: As search engines get better, we become lazier. We’re hooked on easy answers and undervalue asking good questions” is a very long headline for an interesting article in Salon.

Here’s an excerpt:

When-the-researchers

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

October 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy

October 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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PhotoMath & Reactions To It From Around The Web

photomath

You may have already heard about PhotoMath, the new iPhone app that lets you point it at a math problem on a textbook and then solves it while showing all the work involved.

Some are immediately reacting by citing it’s potential use in “cheating,” while others cheer that it might force math teachers and textbook publishers to be more creative in how they teach math. In some ways, it may force them to do what some of us in other subjects have been looking at — creating unGoogleable questions.

Here are some useful posts about the app, along with a video. I’m adding this post to The Best Sites For Beginning iPhone Users Like Me.

PhotoMath Could Change the Way We Think About Teaching Math is by Richard Byrne and, I think, is the first post you should look at.

We Should Wish PhotoMath All The Success In The World is by Dan Meyer.

PhotoMath from MicroBLINK on Vimeo.

October 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My New BAM! Show: “How Can We Make Math More Engaging and Accessible to Students?”

mathmathmath

How Can We Make Math More Engaging and Accessible to Students? is the topic of my newest BAM! Radio Show.

Dr. Anne M. Collins and Sue O’Connell are my guests in this ten minute conversation. You’ll be able to read their written responses in my weekend post at Education Week Teacher.

October 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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How Can We Teach Math Besides ‘Drill The Skill’?

October 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Why A Teacher’s Willingness to Say “I’m Sorry” Matters….

I’ve written a lot about the importance of teachers being able to apologize to students when we mess-up (see The Best Resources On The Importance Of Saying “I’m Sorry”).

Here’s another reason why it’s important. It’s — more or less — a transcript of a story that my colleague and co-author Katie Hull had this morning:

I want to tell you about something that Joan (a student that we have in common — not her real name) told me yesterday. She came to me and said “You and Mr. Ferlazzo write books together, right?”

I told her, “Yes.”

She said, “It’s about how to be a good teacher, right?”

I told that it was, more or less.

Joan then said, “I can tell – you both teach the same way. If Mr. Ferlazzo gets upset at the wrong student for talking, he apologizes. You do, too. Most teachers never say they’re sorry about anything!”

 

October 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Halloween Resources

October 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Some School Districts Resist Enrolling New Refugees From Central America

Four-months-after

The New York Times has published two articles this week about school districts in New York and elsewhere who have been resisting enrolling new refugees from Central America:

Rules and Paperwork Keep Long Island’s Immigrant Children From Classroom

School District on Long Island Is Told It Must Teach Immigrants

Compassion, along with respect for the law, appears to be in short supply in these places.

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources For Learning About The Children Refugee Crisis At The U.S. Southern Border.

October 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Classroom Instruction Resources Of The Week

Each week, I publish a post containing three or four particularly useful resources on classroom instruction, and you can see them all here.

Here are this week’s picks:

I’m adding this tweet to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism:

Time to Debunk Those PBL Myths is by Suzie Boss at Edutopia. I’m adding it to
The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

Aha Moments on the Road to Better Teaching is by Myron Dueck and appeared in Middleweb.

October 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Great Infographic, “A Taxonomy of Halloween Monsters,” Provides Idea For Higher-Order Thinking Lesson

I’ve written a lot about inductive learning, and this neat infographic provides an excellent idea for a higher-ordering thinking Halloween lesson.

As my Beginning and Intermediate English Language Learners study Halloween, they can start categorizing the different monsters and Halloween costumes they learn about — including writing/discussing them and providing reasons for their categorization decisions. I’m sure they’ll enjoy it, and there will be plenty of language-learning involved.

I’m adding this info to The Best Websites For Learning About Halloween.

A Taxonomy of Halloween Monsters

Thanks to Big Group for the infographic.

October 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

What A Shock! Study Finds That Student Reflection Helps Learning

I’ve written a lot about the importance of reflection in learning (see The Best Resources On Student & Teacher Reflection).

A new study reinforces that perspective. You can read about it at Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests.

Here’s an excerpt:

brain-scans-found-that

October 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

More Useful Resources On Race and Racism