Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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You Might Find My New U.S. & World History Class Blogs Useful

ushistory

worldhistory

I’ll be teaching English Language Learners World History, United States History, Geography, and English this year (along with my IB Theory of Knowledge classes).

I’ll be revising and updating my very extensive U.S. History class blog and creating an entirely new one for World History (I’m just beginning to add content to that one now).

You can also find a list of all my blogs here.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Arne Duncan’s Statement Today On Testing — Rhetoric Or Real?

Arne Duncan came out with a big statement on testing today that you’re going to want to read.

Here’s an except, followed by AFT President Randi Weingarten’s response:

I-believe-testing-issues

Here’s the Huffington Post’s take on his statement.

And here’s Barnett Berry’s take on it.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“A shocking statistic about the quality of education research”

Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post picked up my original post on the lack of replication in education research (This Is Interesting & Depressing: Only .13% Of Education Research Experiments Are Replicated) and wrote a much more complete piece on it. She titled it A shocking statistic about the quality of education research.

I think it’s quite important, and worth a “read.”

I’m adding her post to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I’ve recently begin a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2013). I also sometimes include tech tools that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Tackk is a neat tool for creating online “posters” and is on The “All-Time” Best Ways To Create Online Content Easily & Quickly list. They’ve just announced a special education page with class-related templates and examples.

Formatically is a new free online tool I haven’t really explored it yet, but they see that it “will actually format an entire essay in MLA, excluding the individual citations. Here’s a video about it:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Research & Citation Skills.

Reading Recs is a new feature of the extraordinary site, SAS Curriculum Pathways. It’s a new tool that allows students to orally read and record passages that teachers can listen to at a later time. You can read about other similar tools, and the concerns I have about them, here.

TechCrunch writes about a new site that’s designed to reduce the college drop-out rate called Get Set. It:

is taking an algorithmic approach to the drop-out problem, building a natural language processing (NLP) engine that asks students to feed it with data about their college aims and problems which it uses to match students to others who have similar goals/backgrounds or who had the same sort of issues previously and overcame them.

I’m very pessimistic about its chances of success because I don’t think these kinds of challenges can be helped much via anonymous computer screens but, at the same time, I think it’s very, very intriguing. And the reason I feel that way is because it’s a creative tech solution that seems to mirror a successful research project that used a similar tactic done face-to-face, and which I wrote about in my Washington Post piece, The manipulation of Social Emotional Learning. You’ll see a lesson taking this research into account for high-schoolers in my upcoming third book on student motivation.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Three Good Resources On Race & Racism

Regular readers (and not-so-regular readers, since the posts have been so popular) know that I’ve been collecting resources daily on the shooting death of Michael Brown — How Many Of Our Students Feel This Way? (Resources On The Shooting Death of Michael Brown).

Those Michael Brown resources are part of a broader “The Best” list that has also become very popular — A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism.

Here are three valuable additions to that broader list:

The racism of the US criminal justice system in 10 charts is from Vox.

America’s Racial Divide, Charted is from The New York Times.

Ferguson, Watts and a Dream Deferred is also from The New York Times.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Excellent Redesign For Site Highlighting UK Museum Interactives

showme

Show.me, the popular site that collects interactives from museums throughout the United Kingdom, has just unveiled a brand-new (and sorely needed) redesign.

It looks great!

I’m adding it to The Best Collections Of Online Educational Games.

August 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Watch This Video That Uses Legos To Illustrate U.S. Economic Inequality…& Get Depressed

Here are new additions to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality:

The Brookings Institution has created this video to illustrate the lack of economic mobility in the United States to accompany this report:

Rich Kid, Poor Kid: For 30 Years, Baltimore Study Tracked Who Gets Ahead from NPR is a good piece to read their shares similar conclusions.

August 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two Good Videos On How We Learn & How I Plan To Use Them In Class

The Khan Academy (you might want to see The Best Posts About The Khan Academy) recently unveiled three new videos that they have apparently developed with the help of Carol Dweck.

Their main new one is pretty decent and titled “You Can Learn Anything.” It’s the first video embedded below.

The one I really like, though is of John Legend. I don’t agree with his education politics, but he tells a great story of how and what he learned on his way to success. It’s called “Success Through Effort.” That’s the second video embedded below.

I’m not as thrilled with their third video, which has Sal Khan talking with Carol Dweck. You can find better videos of her explaining the growth mindset at The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

At some point during this school year, as a reinforcing activity for our lessons on how we learn and the growth mindset, I plan on showing these two short videos and have students respond to this prompt:

According to these videos, how do we learn? Do you agree with what the videos are saying? To support your opinion you may use examples from your own experiences, your observations of others, and any of your reading.

I’m adding this post to:

My Best Posts On Writing Instruction

The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”


The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures

You might also be interested in Here’s The “Growth Mindset” Article & Prompt We’re Using As Part Of Our Semester Final

August 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Good Resources On Asking Questions

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners is a nice piece by Warren Berger that appeared in Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

Here’s a short video of Warren Berger talking about the importance of questions. I’m adding it to The Best Videos Showing The Importance Of Asking Good Questions:

August 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Is Sure Interesting: “Google May Start Handing Out Gmail Accounts to Kids”

Google May Start Handing Out Gmail Accounts to Kids just appeared in the Atlantic.

Here’s how it begins:

Google may be going kid-friendly. The tech giant is allegedly planning to offer accounts to children under the age of 13 for services like Gmail and YouTube, according to reports.

The unprecedented move would allow children to navigate fully online (without doing so anonymously or lying about their ages, as many have done on sites like Facebook), and allow Google access to the lucrative education market.

The company would also be wading into controversial waters. If the search giant were to open its doors to children under 13, it would have to comply with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), which currently mandates that Internet companies storing data on children must first seek parental consent, and controls how that data is used for targeted advertising. In other words, Google will have to insert parents into the fold in the rumored initiative.

August 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For World Humanitarian Day

UN

The United Nations has declared today to be World Humanitarian Day:

World Humanitarian Day is a time to recognize those who face danger and adversity in order to help others. The day was designated by the General Assembly to coincide with the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq.

World Humanitarian Day is also an opportunity to celebrate the spirit that inspires humanitarian work around the globe

Here are some related resources:

The official website has a ton of resources.

World Humanitarian Day: voices from the field is an interactive from The Guardian.

Here’s a post from last year: Did You Know That Today Was Declared By The UN To Be “World Humanitarian Day”? Beyonce Did