Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Wash. Post Publishes My Annual “Best and worst education news” Of The Year

The Washington Post has just published my annual Best and worst education news of 2014 — a teacher’s list.

My adding it to both The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2014 and to All My 2014 “Best” Lists — So Far — In One Place.

The Post will also be publishing my annual 2015 predictions within the next few days, too.

December 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Three Holiday Gifts To You!

'happy holidays!' photo (c) 2009, melissa brawner - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Here are three Holiday Gifts To Readers:

First, He understood not only what we did but what we were supposed to do is from The Los Angeles Times, and I think it’s the best newspaper story ever written about Christmas.

Second, here’s one of my favorite education-related video. It’s a great example of differentiated instruction. In the video, some ducklings were able to get over the curb on their own. However, several found that it was just too high. Look at how someone provides assistance to those having trouble, and how he doesn’t tell them what to do. Instead, he offers it as an option, as a choice they can make. It’s an example of an old community organizing axiom, “If you don’t give people the opportunity to say no, you don’t give them the opportunity to say yes, either.”


And, third,
several years ago I received a special Christmas gift from Mary Ochs, a good friend who gave me my first job as a community organizer thirty years ago and who was my mentor during my nineteen year organizing career.

It was an older copy of a very small book titled “Axioms For Organizers” by Fred Ross, Sr.

Fred Ross, Sr. was a legendary community organizer. While working for the Industrial Areas Foundation (which I worked for during most of my organizing career) he became Cesar Chavez’s key mentor and adviser. Ross was the author of an extraordinary book that is still available titled Conquering Goliath: Cesar Chavez at the Beginning. In fact, this year, he was selected for the California Hall Of Fame.

Even though the little book that Mary sent me is long out-of-print, a quick Internet search found that it’s still available on a free online PDF.

The book is directed towards organizers, but all of Fred’s axioms offer important advice to teachers, as well.

I’d encourage you to review the entire PDF, which is very short, and here are a few of my favorites:

Short-Cuts –Short-cuts usually end in detours, which lead to dead ends.

Social Arsonist –A good organizer is a social arsonist who goes around setting people on fire.

People – It’s the way people are that counts, not the way you’d like them to be.

Organizing Is –Organizing is providing people with the opportunity to become aware of their own capabilities and potential.

Questions –When you are tempted to make a statement, ask a question.

Enjoy the holidays!

December 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Recent Skeptical Ed Tech Research

December 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

BAM! Radio Redesigns Site – Listen To All Thirty-Three Of My Shows!

newbamradio

BAM! Radio, which hosts my weekly ten-minute conversations with guest who make contributions to my Ed Week teacher advice column, has redesigned their website and it looks great. You can even create your own playlists!

You can find all my shows here (well, most of them — the redesign has put them a little behind in posting shows, but I’m show all of them will be up by next week).

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Education Predictions For 2015

Along with multiple reviews of major education news from the past year (see The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2014), there are also various predictions being made for 2015. I thought I’d begin a collection here.

I usually do my own, and expect to publish it here or elsewhere next week. You can see my previous predictions and assess my qualities of foresight:

Nine educated education predictions for 2014!

10 education predictions for 2012

Education-Related Predictions for 2011

Here are ones I’ve seen so far for 2015 that are worth viewing:

Arne Duncan’s Edu-Predictions for 2015 is from Education Week. Needless to say, they didn’t including anything about stopping the Value-Added Measures attack on teachers.

Education thought leaders forecast 2015 trends is from District Administration. God, I hate the term “thought-leader.”

eLearning Trends to Follow in 2015
Courtesy of: TalentLMS

I’m adding this post to All My 2014 “Best” Lists — So Far — In One Place.

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Resources On Race & Racism

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Quote Of The Day: Fast Food Bad For Student Brains

In a not very big surprise, researchers found that eating junk food means students do worse in school.

Here’s a quote from a story about the study:

Researchers-found-that

The Washington Post goes on to say:

Why exactly fast food could be blunting school children’s brains is unclear. A study conducted last year showed that nutrients like iron, which can be lacking in fast food, are essential for the development of a child’s brain. Diets high in fat and cholesterol have also been linked to poorer memory.

I’m adding this info to The Best Sites For Learning About Nutrition & Food Safety.

I have a lesson plan in my upcoming book on student motivation about this very topic, and this study reinforces it.

While I’m at it, I’m adding The New York Times interactive, What 2,000 Calories Looks Like, to the same list.

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Few Final Excellent Holiday Resources

Here are a few final additions to my already substantial The Best Places To Learn About Christmas, Hanukkah, & Kwanzaa list:

The 12 Days Of Quirky Christmas Foods Around The Globe is from NPR.

America’s Christmas Gift Lists, as Seen by Google is from The New York Times.

Teaching English has lots of great holiday lesson ideas for English Language Learners.

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Have Students See The World Through “Travel By Drone”

drone

Travel By Drone has thousands of videos from around the world that have been made through the use of drones. They’re searchable by geography through a search box, and they are also pins on a map.

I learned about it through an article in today’s New York Times, Seeing the World By Drone.

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning & Teaching Geography.

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Six More Days Left To Contribute! What Was The Best Education-Related Book You Read In 2014?

As I’ve done every December for the past seven years, I invite readers to share what they think was the best education-related book they read during this calendar year. It doesn’t have to have been published in 2014 — you just have to have read it during the past twelve months.

In addition, please share no more than one or two sentences explaining why you think it was the best one. Please leave the info in the comments section.

You have until December 30th to contribute. As usual, I’ll post the final list, along with who contributed the choices, on New Year’s Day.

There are always a ton of books that get listed, and you can see the posts from previous years here:

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2013

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2012

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2011

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2010

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2009

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2008

December 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – Part Two

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This list focuses on sites that ELL students would use directly. Of course, many other sites on my other lists can also be used effectively with ELL’s.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – So Far

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2013 – So Far

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2012 — Part One

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2011

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students — 2010

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students — 2009

The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2008

The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2007

The Best Web 2.0 Applications for ESL/EFL Learners — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – Part Two:

ClipDis a new web and smartphone app that lets you type in any sentence and then provides it to you in a short video with actors from popular movies speaking it. Even better, you don’t have to register in order to create one and be provided a unique url address for linking to it. Here’s one I made.

Incredibox, the incredibly easy music-creating site that’s been on The Best Online Sites For Creating Music list for years, has just announced its annual update. Version Four has even more sounds to mix, and will only make it more fun for students to use. I have my English Language Learners create their tracks and then describe — verbally and in writing — why they made their particular composition and what they want people to visualize when they listen to it.

Write About is a new site co-founded by educator John Spencer (his name may be familiar with readers since I’ve previously shared his work many times here). His co-founder is Brad Wilson. Write About provides many (and I mean many) images with writing prompts. Students can write their response and do an audio recording of it. Teachers can create virtual classrooms and provide individual written feedback to student writing. Student creations can be shared publicly or just with their classmates. Teachers can change prompts or upload their own photos. There’s a lot more, too. Plus, you can’t beat the cost (or non-cost):

Teachers can sign up and participate in the Write About community for free. Up to 40 free student accounts can be created with up to 3 posts each. Unlimited posts can be added with a Classroom account for $4.95/month. Teachers with multiple classes can add up to 250 students with unlimited posts for $7.95/month.

The Emoji Finder invites you to “Search for emoticons, then copy & paste.” I tried a number of words, and it came up with a variety of emoji icons for all of them. I wouldn’t make it a central tool for my teaching, but I could see inviting my Beginning English Language Learners to have fun with it sometime if we had a few minutes left in the computer lab.

The “You Say Potato” accent language map has people all over the world saying the word…”potato.” You can easily add your own voice to it.

Leap.it is a new search engine that portrays search results in a visually attractive way.  One feature that could come in handy for students doing research is that you’re supposed to be able to create something called a “perspective” which appears to just be your own personal collection of sites that could be shared with other. I like that idea, but couldn’t figure out how to make it work.

Thanks to a tweet from Barbara Sakamoto, I learned about site called Unite For Literacy. It has over one-hundred simple books in English that the reader can choose to have narrated in English or their choice of many other languages.

Breaking News is a current events news-reader designed in an intriguing way. You can type in whatever topic you want to read about — soccer, major news, refugees — and you’re provided with a list of headlines to stories about it. Clicking on the headlines will take you to the story. But the real interesting part of the site is that if you click on a globe icon on the upper right of the page, you’ll go to a world map showing you the location of the where the stories are originating. Clicking on the dots will also take you to the story. I’m adding it to The Best Visually Engaging News Sites, which I just completely updated and revised.

 

December 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Tools For Creating “Word Frequency Charts” For Books, Articles & Movies

Google’s Ngram Viewer is the “granddaddy” of tools for creating charts showing the frequency that words are used over time in books. You can see lots of information about that particular tool at The Best Posts To Help Understand Google’s New “Books Ngram Viewer.”

Others now have been implementing their own versions. Here are three that began this year, and I assume more are on the way:

chronicle

The New York Times has created the Chronicle. It’s their version of the Google Books Ngram Viewer, which charts word use over the years in the books they’ve indexed. The Times, though, indexes word usage in its own history. The image at the top of this post shows the results of my charting “love” and “hate.” It looks like love is winning! The Chronicle is very easy to use and no registration is required. It, and the Ngram Viewer, can be used with English Language Learners and other students in a number of ways, ranging from just being a fun and simple way for them to play with words to being a tool to correlate certain word usage with political attitudes (as I did in a recent column at Education Week Teacher).

sacto

london

The same day The New York Times announced their own version of Google’s Ngram Viewer, the online review site Yelp unveiled their own. It’s called Yelp Trends and you can compare how often different words are used in reviews at cities around the world. It’s very easy to use and no registration is required. You can see two examples above that I created – comparing soccer, basketball and jogging in Sacramento and in London. Obviously, soccer isn’t going to be mentioned much in London since they call it football there. I wonder if I shared these with students how many would figure that out? Have students create their own and then challenge their classmates to explain the reason for the differences (after they figure it out themselves) could just be one fun way to use it in class — that is, if Yelp isn’t blocked by school district content filters. You can read more about Yelp Trends at Slate.

bookworm

Bookworm is another addition to this list. Despite its name, it focuses on word use in the movies, and operates in a similar fashion to the other sites I mentioned. Type in a word or phrase and it will search the dialogue in thousands of movies and TV shows and trace differences over the years.

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

December 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Friday Is The Tenth Anniversary Of The Indian Ocean Tsunami – Here Are Related Resources

Friday will be the tenth anniversary of the terrible Indian Ocean Tsunami.

I’ve added some new resources to the post I published on its fifth anniversary — The Best Resources To Learn About The Indian Ocean Tsunami.

December 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Collections Of Infographics, Charts & Maps – 2014

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I still have to post my choices for The Best Infographics of 2014 but, in the meantime, lots of other people are publishing their own choices. So I thought I’d create a separate annual “Best” list of those collections (they also include some that try to explain the year in charts and infographics).

In addition to exploring these lists from others, you can check out my last from last year (which also includes links to those from previous years) — The Best Infographics Of 2013 – Part Two. You can also see A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Infographics.

Look for my choices sometime next week.

Here are The Best Collections Of Infographics, Charts & Maps – 2014:

The Eighteen Best Infographics Of 2014 is from Fast Company/Co-Design.

Our Favorite Maps of the Year is from Wired.

The Best Data Visualization Projects of 2014 is from Flowing Data.

14 Maps That Explain 2014 is from The Atlantic.

14 striking findings from 2014 is from Pew Research.

Four Charts That Defined the World in 2014 is from The New Yorker.

2014: The year in graphics is from The L.A. Times.

December 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

‘Care Is The Catalyst For Learning’

‘Care Is The Catalyst For Learning’ is my latest post at Education Week Teacher.

Sean McComb, P.J. Caposey, Cindi Rigsbee, A. William Place, Jennifer Fredricks and several readers share their thoughts on the role of “care” in the age of standards. This is the last post in a two-part series on this topic.

Here are some excerpts:

A-few-years-ago-a-poll

When-a-student-knows

Teaching-has-changed

Caring-about-the-whole

Researchers-have-found

December 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – Part Two

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Another day, another  “The Best…” list…..

You might also be interested in:

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s — 2010

The Best Sites For Teachers Of English Language Learners — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2014 – Part Two:

All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions — there are three year’s worth, and there are many of them!

Language Travel Tips: How to Talk to Someone Who Doesn’t Speak Much English is from Slate, and could be a very helpful piece for ALL teachers to read.

Picture Word Inductive Model with Highschool Newcomers by Wendi Pillars is an exceptional step-by-step description of how to use one of my favorite ELL teaching strategies.

I’ve written A LOT about the advantages of inductive over deductive learning, and how I also use both in my classroom (You can see many posts here). The British Council shared a short post that Paul Kaye wrote six years ago that does a great job explaining the difference between inductive and deductive, and he provides a number of practical examples from the language-learning classroom. Check out his article, Presenting New Language.

Here’s an extensive list of excellent classroom activities from The British Council.

Literacy Through Photography for English-Language Learners is from Edutopia.

Unlocking Language for English-Learners is an excellent article at Education Week by Justin Minkel.

Teaching learning strategies to ELLs: What, why, when, how is an excellent article from Multi Briefs.

Making reading communicative is a very good post from The British Council.

Interview With People Behind The Most Popular English Language Learning & Teaching Sites In The World

Adam Simpson has also written an excellent three-part series on Socratic Circles.

Do you understand? is from TEFL Reflections.

Here’s a useful post from Ana Cristina on flipping an ESL class. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea.

Julie Goldman, the Coordinator of the great WRITE Institute that creates curriculum for English Language Learners, has written an excellent article on “Research-Based Writing Practices For English Language Learners,” which you can download for free here. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Lizzie Pinard – Course books in the language classroom: friend or foe? is from The British Council.

Core and Quirks has some intriguing ways to diagram verb tenses.

One of my Education Week posts brings together all my pieces posted there from the past three years on teaching English Language Learners — in one place!

Katherine Bilsborough – Taking the stress out of homework: 5 tips and 5 tasks is from The British Council.

To Get Fluent in a New Language, Think in Pictures is from The Wall Street Journal. It might be behind the Journal’s paywall. However, if you do an internet search for the headline and click on it from the search results, you’ll gain access to it. It’s a quirk in how The Journal handles its paywall.

The Disabled Access Friendly Site is for teachers of English Language Learners and “provides teachers with free teaching material that can be used in class, for projects or examination practice, but at the same time stimulates students to put themselves in the shoes of someone with a mobility disability, for a better understanding of their needs and feelings.”

Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners is a website collecting all the resources, including PowerPoints and materials, from a big conference on this topic in July, 2014.

Information gap activities: what does it take to design a successful task? is from A Different Side Of EFL. I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For “Information Gap” Activities.

The Best Resources For Teaching Common Core Math To English Language Learners

I’ve been posting monthly at Teaching English-British Council on very practical issues related to teaching ELLs.

Getting The Least Motivated Students More Motivated By Working With The Most Motivated is a post about an activity that’s been working quite well in my class this year.

Video: My English Language Learners Did A “One-Sentence Project” explains a lesson I did just before winter break that resulted in this video:

The Best Resources For Teaching The Next Generation Science Standards To English Language Learners

Here’s a video of a simple activity my Beginning ELL students did to learn to tell time in English. They created a poster explaining their daily schedule and then explained to the class and on video. You can see more examples at our class blog.

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part Two

I learned about the free Shadow Puppet Edu (what appears to be a premium version of the more commercial Shadow Puppet app) through an article in  ASCD Educational Leadership, and am very, very impressed. It has a bunch of bells and whistles that I haven’t even explored yet but, at its core, it’s an iPhone/iPad app that lets you pick photos and super-easily (and I do mean easily) lets you add audio narration to each photo and create a slideshow.

The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels”

Jimmy Fallon from The Tonight Show keeps on playing new games that are perfect for the language-learning classroom, and I’ve posted about quite a few of them.

Oh, Boy, This Is Great! Researcher’s Scans Show Brain Connections Growing When Learning New Language

Quote Of The Day: “Traditional grammar instruction isn’t effective. Period.”

Here’s A New Reading Activity I Tried Out Today That Went Pretty Well…

Video: Here Is How I Used The Shadow Puppet App Today To Teach Verb Tenses

Here Are Forms My Students Are Using To Evaluate Themselves & Me

A Simple Lesson On Climate Change For English Language Learners

My extraordinarily talented teacher colleague at our high school, Dana Dusbiber, along with the extraordinarily talented bilingual aide Alma Avalos, teach a class of adult English Language Learners once-a-week at our school in the evening. With support from the University of California at Davis, their students have published a “must-read” book that I’m sure will be a model for ESL classes around the country and the world. And the University has made it available free! You can download an eBook version here.  The stories in it are so moving and so well-written. You couldn’t ask for more engaging, and better-written, models for student-writing.

Dreamreader is a new reading site for English Language Learners created by Neil Millington, an English teacher in Japan.

Here’s how he describes it:

There are 25 lessons on the site right now and they cover a variety of topics. I’ll be updating with more free lessons on a regular basis, and by the end of the year I intend to have over 50 free readings on the site. Teachers can have their students read the articles online and do the quizzes or, if they want to use them in their class, they can just download the PDFs and print/copy them. There are also downloadable vocabulary worksheet PDFs that students can use for vocabulary study. The lessons are all graded across a wide range of levels (from beginner through to advanced) and I’ve done my best to develop them by using academic-based criteria (JACET 8000, Flesch Kincaid, etc.) and testing them out with EFL learners. I am planning on adding feedback videos to the site too, and hopefully they will be up and ready next month. I hope that students and teachers will find the site useful.

I’m quite impressed with what he’s done, and I suspect you will be, too….

The Atlantic has published some great pictures at “A Visual History of Kids Being Unimpressed with President Obama.” They’d be perfect to use with English Language Learners to have them talk and write about them.

FluencyTutor For Google is a web app only usable with a Chrome browser that provides a large selection of leveled reading passages that students can read, record, and store on Google Drive. Teachers can then listen at their convenience and correct and note students’ reading fluency. The reading passages provide quite a few supportive features that make them particularly accessible to English Language Learners.

Most of the features are free, but teachers have to pay $99 per year for some “dashboard” services like tracking student progress.

If I was teaching an online class of motivated adult English Language Learners, I could see FluencyTutor’s whole package as an excellent tool.

However, I definitely wouldn’t recommend a classroom teacher using it as a way to track a readers’ progress. I have the same concerns about using it for that as I have about Literably, a web tool in the same vein — having students read to us is as much about building the relationship (if not more so) than getting the data.

On the other hand, though, a site like FluencyTutor could be a super tool for students to practice on their own and compare their reading progress during a school year. It’s less about them tracking exactly how many words they read each minute and more about them seeing how their reading prosody — expressiveness, smoothness — improves. Just having the free features should be enough for accomplishing that goal.

Readers might be interested in three class blogs I maintain for English Language Learners:

English and Geography

United States History

World History

December 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – Part Two

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I continue my end-of-year “The Best…” lists…

The title of this “The Best…” list is pretty self-explanatory. What you’ll find here are blog posts and articles this year (some written by me, some by others) that were, in my opinion, the ones that offered the best practical advice and resources to teachers this year — suggestions that can help teachers become more effective in the classroom today or tomorrow. Some, however, might not appear on the surface to fit that criteria, but those, I think, might offer insights that could (should?) inform our teaching practice everyday.

For some, the headlines provide enough of an idea of the topic and I haven’t included any further description.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2011

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2010

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2009

In addition, you might find these useful:

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice In 2011

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2010

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014- Part Two:

I think teachers will find posts at my Education Week Teacher column very useful, including The Ten Best Classroom Q & A Posts Of 2014. They are all categorized here. My related BAM! Radio show might also be helpful.

Golden Rules for Engaging Students in Learning Activities is from Edutopia.

How to Read Professional Development Books: 7 Tactics You Might Not Be Using is from Teaching The Core.

500 Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing is from The New York Times Learning Network.

56 Examples of Formative Assessment is by David Wees.

Effective teaching: 10 tips on what works and what doesn’t is from The Guardian. It’s a very interesting summary of a meta-analysis on research done over the years.

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds is from Teach Thought. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment.

8 Formative Assessment Data Sources that Help Students Become Better Learners is from Teach Learn Grow. I’m adding it to the same list.

Common Core Reading: The Struggle Over Struggle is from NPR, and I think it’s very good.

50 Ways to Teach With Current Events is from The New York Times Learning Network.

Road Tested / Lesson Closure: Stick the Landing is from ASCD and offers several good idea about ending lessons.

The New York Times Learning Network, one of my long-time favorites for teaching resources (it was the first site listed on The Best Places To Find Free (And Good) Lesson Plans On The Internet — long before I started writing about teaching ELLs for them) has published a list of their most popular posts.  It’s a gold mine!

Talking to Learn is by Elizabeth A. City.

Bryan Goodwin has written an excellent piece in  ASCD Educational Leadership. It’s titled Research Says / Which Strategy Works Best? It’s a concise description of the differences between short-term memory, working memory and long-term memory, with teaching hints for all three.

A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days – a sobering lesson learned appeared in Grant Wiggins’ blog.

Speaking Volumes is by Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey.

Deeper Learning Described and Defined is a useful post from Learning First.

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies is a very good post by Maurice Elias over at Edutopia.

Carol Ann Tomlinson has written a great post over at Peter DeWitt’s Education Week blog. It’s called Inventing Differentiation.

Formative, Summative, Interim: Putting Assessment in Context is from Teach Learn Grow. I’m adding it to A Collection Of “The Best” Lists On Assessment.

Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation and Growth Mindset in Writing is from Edutopia.

It’s Not Just Words: 10 Smart Word Choices of Smart Athletes
is from The Huffington Post, and offers some good advice on word choices that teachers can use, too.

Teaching and Learning with Science Media is from PBS affiliate KQED. I really like some of the PDFs that they offer, and they could be very useful to classes other than science.

Rick Wormeli has a typically great article that’s titled Motivating Young Adolescents. It includes a list of “Top 12 Demotivators” that I think should be taped to every teacher’s desk.

New Study: Engage Kids with 7x the Effect is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On Student Engagement.

Twelve Alternatives to “How Was Your Day?” is by John Spencer. It’s designed as a list of questions for parents to ask their children, but can easily be adapted by teachers for reflection activities. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Student & Teacher Reflection.

Time to Debunk Those PBL Myths is by Suzie Boss at Edutopia.

Reader Idea | Personal Writing Based on The Times’s Sunday Routine Series is a very useful post at The New York Times Learning Network. It’s a simple teacher-suggested lesson plan that includes some very useful student hand-outs.

Two Good Videos On How We Learn & How I Plan To Use Them In Class

Reminder: All Student Hand-Outs From My Student Motivation Book Available Free To Download

Smart Homework: How to Manage & Assess It is by Rick Wormeli. Smart Homework: 13 Ways to Make It Meaningful is also by Rick Wormeli. I’m adding them both to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

No More Language Arts and Crafts is a must-read post by the one-and-only Donalyn Miller, The Book Whisperer.

Combining Creativity and Standards-Driven Instruction is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity.

The Best Posts, Articles & Videos Explaining Why Punishment Is Often Not The Best Classroom Strategy

Two New Good Writing Prompts For My Students

It Doesn’t Matter If It’s “Effective” If Students Won’t Do It

Scott McLeod  sent out a tweet about a forty page PDF document titled “Bloom’s Taxonomy: What’s Old Is New Again.” It’s written by Cecelia Munzenmaier, MS, with Nancy Rubin, PhD.  I’ve got a lot of resources on The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom list, but this document provides the best overview and must up-to-date history — and how to implement it in the classroom, that I’ve seen anywhere.  Granted, it’s forty pages, and that might be more than many want to read, but it is clearly worth the time and the effort.

The Best Fun Videos To Teach Language Conventions — Help Me Find More

Extrinsic Motivation In My Classroom

The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics

The Best Resources On Ferguson For Use In The Classroom

The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels”

The Best Resources For Learning About “Flow.”

Promoting Student Metacognition is a very nice chart of questions students can ask themselves.

Here’s The Form I Have Students Complete When They’re Listening To Their Classmate’s Presentations

Stress management is a critical skill for our students to learn, not to mention being an important one for us teachers, too! I have a pretty good lesson it in my Self-Driven Learning book (you can download the hand-outs for free), and I also have a popular related “Best” list — The Best Resources For Learning About Teens & Stress. The Harvard Business Review has published a short and concise piece sharing various stress management strategies, and it’s excellent. I will certainly be adding How to Handle Stress in the Moment to my lesson and to that Best list. It talking bout stress in the work context, but is easily applicable to any stressful situation.

Quote Of The Day: “When Will I Ever Use This?” (& How I’ll Use It In Class)

Quote Of The Day: “Traditional grammar instruction isn’t effective. Period.”

The Best Resources Sharing The Best Practices For Fruitful Classroom Discussions

The Best Resources On The Idea Of “Wait Time”

Good Classroom Management Advice: “The Person Who Asks The Questions Controls The Conversation”

Excellent List Of Eleven “Classroom Discipline Mistakes”

The Best Resources For Understanding “Personalized Learning”

Apparently, long ago when, for awhile, I moderated a classroom management forum at Edutopia, I invited readers to share their best classroom management tips. Well, Edutopia put them all together in a a nice slideshow that I think readers will find useful.

 

In The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom, which is — by far — the most popular post I’ve ever published, I include videos using Star Wars, Finding Nemo, Pirates of the Caribbean, and other movies to teach Bloom’s. Here’s another such video, and this one uses scenes from Harry Potter. Unfortunately, it has embedding disabled, so you’ll have to go to the link on YouTube. Of course, I’ll be adding it to that list.

“Oh, I Get It! If You Send Me Out, Then I’m Being Bad; If I Send Me Out, Then I’m Being Good!”

I’m a big believer in helping students develop metacognitive skills, and have included related lesson plans in my books and have an extensive The Best Posts On Metacognition list. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has published a free book, along with a short blog post, on the topic. It’s specifically geared toward using metacognition in math class, but the advice is pretty universal.

Why A Teacher’s Willingness to Say “I’m Sorry” Matters….

Warm-Ups, Bell-Ringers, Exit Tickets and…Vitamins?

Teaching Tolerance, the organization justifiably well-known for developing very good social-justice oriented teaching resources, has unveiled: “Perspectives for a Diverse America… a literacy-based curriculum that marries anti-bias social justice content with the rigor of the Common Core State Standards.”  It’s a very ambitious site, and I think most teachers will find the highlight to be 300 great texts, often from larger works, all set-up to print out and copy for students. Those are a gold mine!  I hate to say it, but I generally found the site’s set-up to be fairly convoluted and confusing to navigate, though others may very well feel differently. But, whether you agree with me or not on that, I’m sure you’re going to agree that the texts are a wonderful resource. You do have to register in order to access the site, but it takes a minute to do so.

 

I’m adding this very useful infographic to The Best Sources Of Advice For Making Good Presentations:

A 9 Step Cheatsheet for Becoming a Public Speaking Expert