Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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August’s “The Best” Lists — There Are Now 1,341 Of Them!

August 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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August’s Best Posts From This Blog

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I regularly highlight my picks for the most useful posts for each month — not including “The Best…” lists. I also use some of them in a more extensive monthly newsletter I send-out. You can see older Best Posts of the Month at Websites Of The Month (more recent lists can be found here).

Here are some of the posts I personally think are the best, and most helpful, ones I’ve written during this past month (not in any order of preference):

All My Ed Week Posts On Assessment — In One Place!

“A shocking statistic about the quality of education research”

Excellent Redesign For Site Highlighting UK Museum Interactives

Two Good Videos On How We Learn & How I Plan To Use Them In Class

How NOT To Make Public Policy Change Happen

Reminder: All Student Hand-Outs From My Student Motivation Book Available Free To Download

“The History Project” Is A Great Resource For Teachers Everywhere

“Thinking Like A Scientist Can Help Overcome Allure Of Appearances”

“The Problem With Goal-Setting”

“Rootbook” May Be The Easiest Tool For Creating Online Choose Your Own Adventure Stories

“The High Price Of The American Dream” Is A Free eBook & Great Writing Model For English Language Learners

“Google Classroom” Now Open To Any Teacher With “Google Apps For Ed” Account

Manuscript For My Third Book On Student Motivation Is Done!

Important Study: “Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall”

Good Classroom Management Advice: “The Person Who Asks The Questions Controls The Conversation”

“Detentions make no difference, pupils claim”

Great Poster: “If Great Scientists Had Logos”

“How To Build A Better Teacher” — Praise & Minor Critique

Do We Really Want Our Schools To Be Like Those In South Korea?

McKinsey & Company Projects That Common Core Implementation Will Result In Doubling of Dropout Rate

With Friends Like David Brooks, Social Emotional Learning Doesn’t Need Any Enemies

“Unite For Literacy” Is An Excellent Site For Beginning Readers

 

August 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Updated List Of Teaching Ideas For #MichaelBrown #Ferguson

I’ve previously posted this list of my choices for the best resources/ideas for teaching about the tragedy of Michael Brown’s shooting death in Ferguson. I’ve since added some new resources and thought it would be useful to share this updated list:

August 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

small things: increasing participation in classroom discussions is from Educating Grace.

No Time To Think is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Student & Teacher Reflection.

Free 2 Work is designed to:

Learn how your favorite brands relate to trafficking and other labor abuses. Free2Work provides consumers with information on forced and child labor for the brands and products they love.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Human Trafficking Today.

Google Wants To Improve Its Translations Through Crowdsourcing is from TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Google Translate & Other Forms Of Machine Translation.

Go Wild is an informative site about animals from the World Wildlife Federation (I learned about it via Richard Byrne). I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Animals.

Genius Hour and the 6 Essentials of Personalized Education is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Applying “Fed Ex Days” To Schools.

Researchers Discover “Superdialects” Through Twitter Study is from Read Write. I’m adding it to The Best “Language Maps.”

Smart Homework: How to Manage & Assess It is by Rick Wormeli. Smart Homework: 13 Ways to Make It Meaningful is also by Rick Wormeli. I’m adding them both to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

August 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Resources On California’s Drought

Storm gathering at Death Valley
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: QQ Li via Compfight

Here are new additions to A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On California’s Drought:

Drought in California – in pictures is from The Guardian.

Tapping the final reservoir is an infographic from The Washington Post.

14 Facts Everyone Should Know About The California Drought is from BuzzFeed.

 

August 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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August’s (2014) Best Tweets — Part Three

'Twitter' photo (c) 2010, West McGowan - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Every month I make a few short lists highlighting my choices of the best resources I through (and learned from) Twitter, but didn’t necessarily include them in posts here on my blog.

I’ve already shared in earlier posts several new resources I found on Twitter — and where I gave credit to those from whom I learned about them. Those are not included again in post.

If you don’t use Twitter, you can also check-out all of my “tweets” on Twitter profile page.

You might also be interested in The Best Tweets Of 2014 — So Far.

August 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Important Resources On Race & Racism

Here are new additions to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism:

The black-white gap in life expectancy is narrowing — but it’s still too wide is from Vox.

Gordon Parks’ 1950s Photo Essay On Civil Rights-Era America Is As Relevant As Ever is from The Huffington Post.

This is a great Louis CK piece on race. He says two classroom inappropriate words, but they are beeped-out:

August 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Valuable Posts & Articles On Education Policy – Part Two

Usually, I just post one weekly “round-up” of recent posts on educational policy issues. However, this week there were quite a few, so here’s Part Two:

For Reformers: An Important Paper on Worker Compensation and Incentives is by Paul Bruno, and is a very important piece. Thought it touches on a number of issues, I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why Teacher Merit Pay Is A Bad Idea.

The Trouble With “The Trouble With Tenure” is by David B. Cohen. I’m adding it to The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Both Why Teacher Tenure Is Important & The Reasons Behind Seniority-Based Layoffs.

School Reformers’ Pledge of Good Conduct is by Larry Cuban.

LAUSD report faults iPad bidding is from The Los Angeles Times. I’m adding it to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

Cooks, Chefs, and Teachers: A Long-Form Debate on Evaluation (Part 3a) is by Ben Spielberg. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

The New York Times has just published a review of a great book by Dana Goldstein titled “The Teacher Wars.” I love the entire book, and I think the introduction itself is one of the best overall piece on education policy that I’ve read. In a little more than a week, I’ll be publishing in Ed Week an interview I did with Dana recently.

The Times has also published a review of another excellent education book, “Building A Better Teacher,” by Elizabeth Green (I’ve previously posted about this book). Next week, I’ll also be publishing an interview I just did with Elizabeth — again, at Ed Week.

August 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

I’ve started a somewhat regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention:

Mary Ann Zehr shared an interesting article on How To Start Academic Conversations. I got tired just reading about what the researchers were having the teacher do in the classroom, but I was intrigued by their ideas of students learning simple hand gestures to reinforce academic conversation prompts. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Why language learners don’t have to miss the punchline is from The Guardian.

ELLs to Keep Increasing as K-12 Schools Cross ‘Majority-Minority’ Threshold is from Education Week.

English Learner Ruling Challenges State’s Lax Oversight is also from Ed Week.

Florida in Waiver Stand-Off With Ed. Department Over ELL Testing is from Ed Week.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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You Might Find My New U.S. & World History Class Blogs Useful

ushistory

worldhistory

I’ll be teaching English Language Learners World History, United States History, Geography, and English this year (along with my IB Theory of Knowledge classes).

I’ll be revising and updating my very extensive U.S. History class blog and creating an entirely new one for World History (I’m just beginning to add content to that one now).

You can also find a list of all my blogs here.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Arne Duncan’s Statement Today On Testing — Rhetoric Or Real?

Arne Duncan came out with a big statement on testing today that you’re going to want to read.

Here’s an except, followed by AFT President Randi Weingarten’s response:

I-believe-testing-issues

Here’s the Huffington Post’s take on his statement.

And here’s Barnett Berry’s take on it.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“A shocking statistic about the quality of education research”

Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post picked up my original post on the lack of replication in education research (This Is Interesting & Depressing: Only .13% Of Education Research Experiments Are Replicated) and wrote a much more complete piece on it. She titled it A shocking statistic about the quality of education research.

I think it’s quite important, and worth a “read.”

I’m adding her post to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I’ve recently begin a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2013). I also sometimes include tech tools that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Tackk is a neat tool for creating online “posters” and is on The “All-Time” Best Ways To Create Online Content Easily & Quickly list. They’ve just announced a special education page with class-related templates and examples.

Formatically is a new free online tool I haven’t really explored it yet, but they see that it “will actually format an entire essay in MLA, excluding the individual citations. Here’s a video about it:

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Research & Citation Skills.

Reading Recs is a new feature of the extraordinary site, SAS Curriculum Pathways. It’s a new tool that allows students to orally read and record passages that teachers can listen to at a later time. You can read about other similar tools, and the concerns I have about them, here.

TechCrunch writes about a new site that’s designed to reduce the college drop-out rate called Get Set. It:

is taking an algorithmic approach to the drop-out problem, building a natural language processing (NLP) engine that asks students to feed it with data about their college aims and problems which it uses to match students to others who have similar goals/backgrounds or who had the same sort of issues previously and overcame them.

I’m very pessimistic about its chances of success because I don’t think these kinds of challenges can be helped much via anonymous computer screens but, at the same time, I think it’s very, very intriguing. And the reason I feel that way is because it’s a creative tech solution that seems to mirror a successful research project that used a similar tactic done face-to-face, and which I wrote about in my Washington Post piece, The manipulation of Social Emotional Learning. You’ll see a lesson taking this research into account for high-schoolers in my upcoming third book on student motivation.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Three Good Resources On Race & Racism

Regular readers (and not-so-regular readers, since the posts have been so popular) know that I’ve been collecting resources daily on the shooting death of Michael Brown — How Many Of Our Students Feel This Way? (Resources On The Shooting Death of Michael Brown).

Those Michael Brown resources are part of a broader “The Best” list that has also become very popular — A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism.

Here are three valuable additions to that broader list:

The racism of the US criminal justice system in 10 charts is from Vox.

America’s Racial Divide, Charted is from The New York Times.

Ferguson, Watts and a Dream Deferred is also from The New York Times.

August 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Excellent Redesign For Site Highlighting UK Museum Interactives

showme

Show.me, the popular site that collects interactives from museums throughout the United Kingdom, has just unveiled a brand-new (and sorely needed) redesign.

It looks great!

I’m adding it to The Best Collections Of Online Educational Games.