Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 2, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: You Can Now Pre-Order Our New ELL Book On Amazon!

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

 

You can now pre-order our upcoming book on Amazon.

The ELL Teacher’s Toolbox: Hundreds of Practical Ideas to Support Your Students will be published in April, 2018.

In the meantime, you can access tons of free resources from our – and my – previous books here.

January 2, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: Why Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough….

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

 

As regular readers know, I’m a big advocate of Social Emotional Learning (The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources).

I’ve also been a critique of those, like NY Times columnist David Brooks, who promote what I call “The Let Them Eat Character” strategy by suggesting that all people have to do is develop some of those SEL skills, like grit and self-control in order to escape poverty (see The Best Resources Showing Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough).

Ben Carson, Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, became the latest person parroting that line this week saying that people in poverty just have “the wrong mind-set.”

Today, The New York Times published a response to his comments, and it’s the best rebuttal imaginable. Columnist Emily Badger basically took all the research you can find in my “Best” list and summarized it succinctly. In the future, you won’t have to bother reviewing all those links – just reader her column, Does ‘Wrong Mind-Set’ Cause Poverty or Vice Versa?

Here’s an excerpt:

January 2, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: I Suspect That Many ELL Teachers Will Want To Use These Personal Stories As Models For Their Students

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

Last month, I published Guest Post: What ELLs Taught Our School In A Week-Long Empathy Project written by my talented colleague, Pam Buric.

Pam shared about a project we did at our school where our Intermediate English Language Learner students wrote about their personal experiences and then other classes came to learn from them over a week’s time.

Those Intermediate ELLs then helped my Beginning ELL students to write their own stories.

Now, Pam and her Intermediate class have pulled together all of those stories into a downloadable PDF book, which I have permission to share here. The description of the process and all the downloadable materials in Pam’s original post, along with the Beginner and Intermediate models, should make it a lot easier for others who might want to do similar projects (‘ll also add this link to Pam’s original post).

Thanks to Pam and her students!

January 1, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: Bingo! There Are Issues With This Study On Grit & ELLs, But I Am Sure Going To Use It With My Students

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

Learning The Language over at Education Week has just posted about a new study on grit and English Language Learners.

Here’s an excerpt from their summary of the research:

The study itself, Individual Versus Peer Grit: Influence on Later Individual Literacy Achievement of Dual Language Learners, is NOT behind a paywall.

I have several concerns about the research, including issues about accurately measuring peer behavior on individual students (see the Brookings Report The problem with measuring effects of delinquent peers in education—and how to get around it and the fact that this study uses student self-report to make its determinations (see Brookings Report The Limitations of Self-Report Measures of Non-cognitive Skills).

Nevertheless, I will certainly be telling my English Language Learner students about the results of this study (along with saying, as I do most of the time that I share research summaries, that there’s not a guarantee of accuracy). Basically, it seems to me to mean that if everybody in the class works hard, then individual achievement increases more for everybody. Even people who would ordinarily work hard learn more if everybody else works hard, too.

Its conclusions support the big push I started late last year about how everyone’s actions not only affect themselves, but others (see “Everyone Is A Teacher” Is A New Engagement Strategy I’m Using & It Seems To Be Working).

In June, a study was published finding that thinking of our impact on others can have a major impact on strengthening our motivation to complete a task (see Intriguing Research On How To Increase Intrinsic Motivation).  That finding reinforces that effort, which I began in April.

And, just last week another study came out with the same theme related to classroom management (see Focusing On The Impact Classroom Disruptions Have On Others, Not On The Students Doing The Disrupting).

This new grit study is “icing on the cake.” I’m looking forward to putting it all together in one lesson for the fall. Of course, I will share what I do and its results in a future post.

I’m going to add this info to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

January 1, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: This Is Interesting: Hattie Says Jigsaw Strategy Hits a Homerun

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

Katrina Schwartz has written an excellent article over at MindShift headlined How Do You Know When A Teaching Strategy Is Most Effective? John Hattie Has An Idea.

She’s done a masterful job of explaining a fairly undecipherable study Hattie and a colleague wrote last year (undecipherable, that is, to those of us not familiar with academic jargon). I wrote about that report when it came out highlighting its most useful part – a great list of learning strategies (see Monster Study On Learning Strategies Released).

Katrina has combined her willingness to dig into the report with her presence at a recent Hattie presentation where he discussed its findings.

Her entire piece is worth reading. After she reviewed Hattie’s “learning model,” though, I was particularly struck by how enthusiastically he endorsed the jigsaw instructional strategy, which is one that I use often. Here’s that portion:

 

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On John Hattie’s Research

The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas

December 31, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: Study Finds Adding More Periods Of Instruction That Didn’t Work In First Place Doesn’t Help High School Readers

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

I will always remember interpreting for a colleague who was telling a student and his mother that he offered tutoring after school everyday.

“But, Mr. ____, you teach the same way then that I didn’t understand during class,” replied the student.

Now, Evidence in Brief has shared a an update on a big study titled Effective Reading Programs for Secondary Students.

Here’s an excerpt:

The same Evidence In Brief shared another study that found minimal positive impacts on increasing class time for all students.

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources On The Idea Of Extending The School Day.

December 31, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “The Platinum Rule” Is A Key To Effective Differentiation

Over the next few days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

 

I’ve written and shared a lot about differentiated instruction (see The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction)

I just read an interview with author Kim Scott where I think she hit on a key to successful differentiation (you can read the full interview at Lead by Caring and Challenging: An Interview with “Radical Candor” Author Kim Scott).

Here’s the “money” quote:

Whether it’s knowing how students will react to classroom management strategies, the different styles of error correction, or if they’re having a bad day and want to do their work alone in the library, the idea of a platinum rule is good point to keep in mind.

December 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: More Studies Finding That If Educators Are Good At Raising Test Scores, They Might Be Missing The Boat With Other Skills

Over the next ten days, I’ll be taking a break now-and-then from blogging to both take some R & R and to finish-up some more extended writing projects.

During this short break, I’ll be re-posting some of my favorite posts of 2017.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2014’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2015’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2016’s Best Posts From This Blog

I’ve previously posted about studies that have found that the laser-like focus on raising student test scores often identifies teachers who are good at doing that, but those VAM-like measures tend to short-change educators who are good at developing Social Emotional or “non-cognitive skills” (see More Evidence Showing The Dangers Of Using High-Stakes Testing For Teacher Evaluation ; Another Study Shows Limitations Of Standardized Tests For Teacher Evaluations; Study Finds Teachers Whose Students Achieve High Test Scores Often Don’t Do As Well With SEL Skills and SEL Weekly Update).

And those have been followed-up by further research finding that that ninth-grade teachers who are particularly good in helping student acquire non-cognitive skills are more successful “much larger in magnitude” in having students graduate and attend college than those whose work results in higher test scores alone (see You’ll Want To Read This Interview With Education Researcher Kirabo Jackson).

Two additional studies now reinforce the findings that focusing on test scores could result in teachers missing the boat on other critical factors.

Teacher Effects on Complex Cognitive Skills and Social-Emotional Competencies is the title of one by Matthew A. Kraft. Here’s an excerpt:

 

One additional practical benefit from his paper is that he reproduces in the appendix copies of simple surveys that have been used to measure perseverance and a growth mindset. No, they shouldn’t be used for high-stakes assessment (you can find lots of articles at The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources about why that’s a bad idea). However, I think they could be very useful for those of us in the classroom who want to use it in the spirit of being data-informed and not data-driven (The Best Resources Showing Why We Need To Be “Data-Informed” & Not “Data-Driven”) as formative assessments.

Chalkbeat covers more research at When teachers are better at raising test scores, their students are less happy, study finds.

And before some begin to wonder if “happiness” is a loosey-goosey term that means teachers just have to show movies and give out candy, the researcher instead finds that a pre-requisite for student happiness is creating an “emotionally supportive classroom environment.”

I think everyone would agree that this kind of atmosphere is a critical one for learning to flourish.

So, perhaps evaluating teacher effectiveness is far-more complicated than many think. Who would have thought?

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