Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

June 14, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – So Far

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This list focuses on sites that ELL students would use directly. Of course, many other sites on my other lists can also be used effectively with ELL’s.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced English Language Learner Sites

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – So Far

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2013 – So Far

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2012 — Part One

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2011

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students — 2010

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students — 2009

The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2008

The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2007

The Best Web 2.0 Applications for ESL/EFL Learners — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – So Far:

Words Can Save is an interactive designed to raise awareness of cyberbullying. You’re prompted to provide advice to a child who is a victim by completing gap-fills/clozes like the one above. Unfortunately, though, for some odd reason you’re supposed to be eighteen to use it. If you say you’re under that age, you’re transferred to a much less engaging site.

WaitChatter Helps You Learn A New Language While You Wait For IM Replies

The English Game is a very British-oriented video interactive site for learning English. It’s impressive.

The “All-Time” Best 2.0 Tools For Beginning English Language Learners

“Google Translate” Starts A Big Time Update Today

Duolingo For Schools Opened Today – Here’s How It Works

I’ve previously posted about the Lingual.ly app and web version. It basically lets you say what language you speak and what language you want to learn; provides a ton of current newspaper articles in your target language; lets you click on words new to you to find out their translation; and then turns them into saved virtual flashcards you can study. It’s accessible to high-intermediate and advanced language learners. TechCrunch reports they have raised a bunch of money, and they plan on spending some of it to provide resources for Beginners, along with the ability for teachers to create virtual classrooms. I’ll be very interested in seeing what they end up developing — depending upon on how engaging they make their new resources, it might be more useful for ELL students and teachers.

I’m adding this infographic to The Best Resources For Learning The Advantages To Being Bilingual Or Multilingual:

Infographic on Second Languages

Source

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June 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – So Far

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As regular readers know, I teach an International Baccalaureate “Theory of Knowledge” class (in fact, this year I teach two of them!). Our school structures our IB program a bit differently from many others by having a whole lot of students take individual IB classes; we have relatively few who are taking all IB classes in order to get the IB diploma. I really like this set-up, and it opens up my TOK class to a lot more students.

As I’ve said before, I can’t think of a high school class that would be more fun to teach or more fun to take…

You might also be interested in:

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – Part Two

All Of My Theory Of Knowledge “Best” Lists In One Place!

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — Part One

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources — 2010

Here are my choices for The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – So Far:

How Can We Help Students Feel That Theory Of Knowledge Class Is More Relevant To Their Lives

Teaching Knowledge Questions In IB Theory Of Knowledge

I’ve written in my New York Times column about how I use optical illusions with English Language Learners, and I certainly use them when teaching perception in my Theory of Knowledge class. You can many that I’ve previously posted here. The BBC has now published what is probably the “be all and end all” of resources on optical illusions over the years. It’s titled How your eyes trick your mind and will certainly come in handy.

The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem”

Here’s a video and article about turning a Van Gogh painting to 3D. I think it would be useful in a Theory of Knowledge discussion of perception and art…

I have  added a number of new resources and also redesigned my IB Theory of Knowledge class blog. It’s filled with years of very, very practical classroom resources, including many lessons I use and lots of examples of student work (including oral presentations, TOK essays, etc.).

I’ve previously shared the essay planning form I developed last year for my IB Theory of Knowledge students and, in case you missed it,you can download it here. Even better, though, is a great student model I’ve been given permission to share here. You can download it here.

This Is The Easiest Way I’ve Found To Upload Multiple TOK (Or Any Student) Presentation Videos

Here’s The Evaluation Form I Created For TOK Oral Presentations

Reading With Imagination is the title of an intriguing column in The New York Times. It’s written by Lily Tuck. I thought it made some points of particular interest to IB Theory of Knowledge teachers related to… imagination.

Here’s an excerpt:

In-his-book-The-Act-of

As International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge teachers know, emotion and imagination are two “Ways Of Knowing” (for people unfamiliar with TOK, the curriculum defines a number of qualities as ways we acquire knowledge, and then divides that knowledge into “Areas Of Knowing” like history, math, etc.). Here’s the video trailer for the new Pixar movie titled “Inside Out.” Not only does it look great for anyone, it looks like it will also be perfect for TOK classes.

Science Daily reported on research that provides more evidence of why we might be resistant to new ideas (sort of, but I don’t think exactly, like confirmation bias). Here’s an excerpt from the article titled Why good solutions make us oblivious to better ones:

We-believe-that-we

TED Talks uploaded a fascinating one — Can we create new senses for humans? with David Eagleman.Here’s how they describe it:

As humans, we can perceive less than a ten-trillionth of all light waves. “Our experience of reality,” says neuroscientist David Eagleman, “is constrained by our biology.” He wants to change that. His research into our brain processes has led him to create new interfaces to take in previously unseen information about the world around us. You can read the transcript here. It’s perfect for International Baccalaureate classes studying Perception.

Learning about Plato’s Allegory of the Cave is a key lesson in most IB Theory of Knowledge courses, and I’ve also been able to integrate it into my English Language Learner classes, too. You can see many of the resources I use in the classroom, including student-made videos of modern parable versions, at our class blog. TED-Ed released a lesson and accompanying video that will be a nice addition.

Quote Of The Day: “Teaching Doubt” (& How I’m Going To Use It In Class)

Nearly 2,000 Categorized Resources For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes

Quote Of The Day: How Language Affects Our Perception Of The World

The Value Of Students Creating Their Own Evidence

The Best Resources On “The Dress”

Student Examples From Theory Of Knowledge Project

“What If?” Projects From My Theory Of Knowledge Class

This video would be great to use in IB Theory of Knowledge classes when we discuss language:

The question, “Was Mathematics invented or discovered?” is discussed in almost every IB Theory of Knowledge class.

I’ve previously posted about a a TED-Ed video on this topic that I didn’t think was a very good one.

The World Science Festival has just published a much better video responding to this question, and which I’ll definitely be using in class:

The Problem With History Classes is a thought-provoking article in The Atlantic. It’s perfect for IB Theory of Knowledge teachers, as well as history educators.

Here’s an excerpt:

history-is-anything-but

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June 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

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Time for another mid-year ”The Best…” list.

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site, though there is one on this list that doesn’t quite meet this particular criteria.

* be seen by me during 2015. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015- So Far:

Johnny Appl is an online trivia game that donates money to plant trees every time you answer a certain number of questions correctly. You can learn more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best “Cause-Related” Online Learning Games.

“Quizizz” Is A Great Game-Playing & Game-Creating Site For Classes!

Sam Chaltain is co-producer of a PBS online series called 180 Days: Hartsville that looks like it’s definitely worth watching. Along with the documentary, Sam and his colleagues have created a “game” called 180 Days: Challenge. In it, you choose the role of a teacher, principal or parent and are then asked ten questions — in effect, problem-based scenarios — that each have very well-thought out potential options as responses. At the end of a game, you’re given a “personalized” analysis based on your answers but, more importantly, a very realistic and sophisticated analysis of how it all fits into the education landscape.

Google Feud would be a super-helpful and fun game for high school English Language Learners if you could be guaranteed of classroom appropriate responses, but that’s never going to happen so it will only be usable in adult classes. You pick a category in the game (culture, people, etc.) and then it gives you a phrase, like “wrestling is.” Then you have to guess the top ten responses that would come up in a Google autocomplete box.

I’ve shared a lot of online “choose your own adventure games” that are engaging for English Language Learners and others (see The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories). Here are two that have recently been created and, even though I suspect students won’t be enthralled by them, nevertheless provide models for teachers to show for student assignments:

Play this game to see what it’s like to be John Boehner is from Vox.

How To Win An Oscar is from The Los Angeles Times.

Magical Moments is a really interesting sort of “choose your own adventure” interactive where you experience a day of school through the eyes of a young student, including making various choices along the way. The audio is in Norwegian, but it has English subtitles.

Traveling The World is an online geography game from Air France that works like a sort of scavenger hunt. You’ve got to register in order to play it, but it takes seconds and, like me, you can log in with a fake name and made-up email address quickly.

The Internet Archive has brought over 2,000 MS-DOS games, including the famous Oregon Trail game. In the past, I’ve had students try-out a poor substitute for the class game. It’s called Westward Trail. But now they get to play the original!

Quizzity is an online geography game where you have to choose the city in which a photo has been taken. You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best Online Geography Games.

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June 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Tweets Of 2015 – So Far

June 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2015 – So Far

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Another day, another  mid-year “The Best…” list…..

You might also be interested in:

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s — 2010

The Best Sites For Teachers Of English Language Learners — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2015 – So Far:

Jellybean Scoop provides free daily new content for students to read. They don’t “level” the same text, they do provide different articles at different levels of accessibility. Each article provides audio support for the text. More importantly, they also provide a number of interactive exercises for each article. Thankfully, they are not just comprehension questions (though they do have that, too). The other activities include sentence scrambles and vocabulary exercises. They also provide an opportunity for readers to record their voice reading portions of the articles after they hear it read to them. Teachers can create an account for up to one hundres students for free and track student progress. Teachers register and then easily create student accounts.

I’ve got to recommend my Ed Week Teacher column and its accompanying BAM! Radio Shows, both which contained a number of columns/episodes on teaching English Language Learners.

I write a regular monthly post for the British Council, like this one on ESL/ELL error correction – Yes, No or Maybe?

Using Video In The Classroom – A Teacher’s Handbook is from David Deubelbeiss.

I wrote several more posts for The New York Times, and you can see them all at All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions

Here’s How My ELL Beginner/Intermediate Class Evaluated Me

Here Are The Results Of Anonymous Class Evaluations From My English Language Learner History Class

Make Beliefs, the popular comic-creator that is on The Best Ways To Make Comic Strips Online list, has just unveiled a new and expansive resource section filled with free materials for teachers of English Language Learner students.

This Is The Geography “Final” For My ELL Students

ELL teachers and students might be interested in my revised U.S. History, World History,  blogs. Also, you might want to check out my ELL English and Geography class blog.

A Simple Game Using Academic Language

Here’s A Successful Music Lesson We Did With Beginning ELLs (Hand-Outs & Student Examples Included)

“Edueto” Has Got To Be One Of The Best Teacher & Web 2.0 Sites Of The Year

Inductive and deductive grammar teaching: what is it, and does it work? is from the English Language Teaching Global Blog. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching.

The Best Advice On Creating Materials For ELLs (& Other Students) – Help Me Find More

Academic Language Function Toolkit is from the Sweetwater School District and looks very useful. Maria Dove shared it on Twitter. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Video For All has a ton of resources about using video in language-teaching. I’m adding it to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them).

Games for the language classroom: Who wants to be a millionaire is another great post by Adam Simpson. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

Simple ELL Writing Assignment On Imperialism

The “All-Time” Best 2.0 Tools For Beginning English Language Learners

Here’s How We’re Using “WhatsApp” For Language-Learning

“Photographer Writer Illustrator” Would Be Unique Way To Use Photos With ELLs

Here’s The End-of-Year Goal-Setting Activity I’ve Done With English Language Learners – Including Worksheet & Video

I Like “ThinkCERCA” For ELL Reading Practice In Free Virtual Classrooms

“Animal Translations” Are Great For ELLs

Kieran Donaghy has a great new blog called Film in Action.

Word Jumble: Practicing sentence structures is from tekhnologic. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Creating Sentence Scrambles.

Free e-book: Using Games in the Language Classroom is from Adam Simpson. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

Revision With Games comes from Cristina Skybox. I’m adding it to the same list.

How to use songs in the English language classroom is a great post by Adam Simpson. I’m adding it to The Best Music Websites For Learning English.

Study Finds Another Reason To Look At ELLs Through Lens Of “Assets”: They Are Likely To Be More Creative

Here’s a useful list of activities from the British Council that ELL teachers can do with “Zero Materials.”

This Resource Might Be A Huge Help For Applying Common Core To Teaching ELLs

English teachers, are you asking the right questions? is a really interesting post from The British Council. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment.

THE REAL TRICK: TURNING A TEST INTO A GAME is from tekhnologic. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom.

How to set up an information gap is by Sandy Millin. I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For “Information Gap” Activities.

No Surprise In This Study: Language Learners Retain Vocabulary Better When Connected To Gestures & Images

Jimmy Fallon Models Yet Another Game Useful For English Language Learners

What Are People In This Painting Thinking?

New “Warm-Ups” I’m Doing With My English Language Learners

I was browsing Pinterest and came upon this page after searching “infographic language ell”. Wow, what a treasure chest of useful visualizations!

Here Is The New Student Self-Assessment I’m Using At The End Of Our Semester

Duolingo For Schools Opened Today – Here’s How It Works

The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching

Rachael Roberts – Motivating students to write is from The British Council. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Learning to Write Like a Reader: Teaching Students How to Edit and Do Peer-Review is from Teaching Learning/Learning Teacher.

I’m going to add the resource shared in this tweet to The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners. It’s a gold mine!

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June 12, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – So Far

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I continue my mid-year “The Best…” lists…

The title of this “The Best…” list is pretty self-explanatory. What you’ll find here are blog posts and articles this year (some written by me, some by others) that were, in my opinion, the ones that offered the best practical advice and resources to teachers this year — suggestions that can help teachers become more effective in the classroom today or tomorrow. Some, however, might not appear on the surface to fit that criteria, but those, I think, might offer insights that could (should?) inform our teaching practice everyday.

For some, the headlines provide enough of an idea of the topic and I haven’t included any further description.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2011

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2010

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2009

In addition, you might find these useful:

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice In 2011

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2010

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015- So Far:

I’ve got to recommend my Ed Week Teacher column and its accompanying BAM! Radio Shows.

All of the many – and I mean many - student hand-outs in my new book on student motivation are now on the publisher’s site and can be downloaded for free — no registration is required. Just click on the “eResources” tab. And Routledge has been kind of enough to do the same for the zillion student hand-outs in my previous two student motivation books, too, though for those books they’re called “Supplemental Downloads.” Jossey-Bass has done the same with hand-outs from my last book on teaching English Language Learners (by the way, a sequel to that popular title will be published in 2016).

“It’s Been A Pleasure Having You In Class This Year”

How I Learned Differentiation appeared in Teach Thought, and is excellent. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

I think these excerpts from my third book on student motivation are useful:

Modelling Writing and Rich Tea or Hob Nob? from Class Teaching both make great points and offer suggestions about the role of teacher modeling in writing instruction.

Useful Collection Of “Growth Mindset” Animations

Adventures with gallery critique is by Andy Tharby. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction.

Last year I briefly referred to a study done in the United Kingdom evaluating what teaching strategies work best. A recent post by John Tomsett prompted me to revisit that meta-analysis from The Education Endowment Foundation, and it’s clearly worth exploring deeply (it’s official title is “The Teaching and Learning Toolkit). The report provides a John Hattie-like list of various interventions, along with their costs, the quality of evidence supporting each one, and the number of learning months research has showed it to gain for students. Though I say it’s Hattie-like, some of its findings seem to conflict with his. I’m very impressed with the UK analysis, and am planning on digging into it over the summer.

Google’s New “Expeditions” Looks Like An Insanely Cool Way For Students To Take A Virtual Field Trip

Read This: “Teachers More Likely to Label Black Students as Troublemakers” is by Renee Moore.

A Teacher’s Role in Fighting Racism is from Education Week.

Uncomfortable Conversations: Talking About Race In The Classroom is from NPR.

History Lesson: Giving Students Freedom to Create Their Own Projects is by Brison Harvey at Ed Week. One point he makes that I think is particularly intriguing is letting his students develop individualized rubrics for their independent projects.

Tips for Using iPads in the Classroom is from Edudemic.

Why I Prefer Pre-Teaching to Remediation for Struggling Students is by Justin Minkel.

Here’s My Chapter On Elements Of A Successful Lesson, Along With Student Hand-Outs THEY Use To Teach

“Quizizz” Is A Great Game-Playing & Game-Creating Site For Classes!

Justin Baeder at Principal Center Radio interviews me about student motivation and my new book, Building A Community Of Self-Motivated LearnersIt was a fun conversation, and you might find it interesting…

Thanks to reader Vincy Murgillo for letting me know about the Smithsonian’s Tween Tribune. It provides daily news stories, with the same one edited several times for different reading levels. The stories also have self-scoring quizzes and provide decent “critical thinking” questions that students can respond to in the comments. On top of that, teachers can create virtual classrooms to monitor it all, as well as moderating student comments. And it’s all available for free!

Reading Strategies, Student Engagement, & The Question Of “Why?”

Help Students Close Read Iconic Images is an excellent post by Frank Baker in Middleweb.

Concise and Precise Micro-writing is from Alex Quigley, and offers some very good suggestions.

Here Are Some Examples Of Using “Concept Attainment” In Writing Instruction

Goal-Setting Lesson Plan

The Limits To The Power Of A Growth Mindset (& The Dangers When We Don’t Recognize Them)

Three Useful Growth Mindset Resources

I’ve previously posted about Reading Teacher, a great site for beginning readers that’s been around for awhile, but just stopped charging for its use (see “Reading Teacher” Is A Good Site For Very Beginners). At that time, though it was free for individual use, you still had to pay if you wanted to create a virtual classroom. They recently announced that it’s now free to create a virtual classroom of 30 students to track their progress. The site says that if you have more students, you can just create another free account using a different email address to create a second virtual classroom.

Top 20 Principles from Psychology for PreK–12 Teaching and Learning is a brand-new report from the American Psychological Association (APA). Though there’s nothing in it that regular readers of this blog wouldn’t already know, it nevertheless provides what might be the best readable compilation of important strategies around Social Emotional Learning Skills, assessment, and classroom management that can be found anywhere.

Apps, Apps Everywhere: Are Any Good, You Think? is the title of my article in ASCD Educational Leadership. In it, I share my choices for the best eleven mobile-learning apps out there.

“Edueto” Has Got To Be One Of The Best Teacher & Web 2.0 Sites Of The Year

Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Metacognition.

Teaching MS History: Themes or Timelines? is from Middleweb.

Every Teacher’s Guide to Assessment is from Edudemic. I’m adding it to A Collection Of “The Best” Lists On Assessment.

The Best Resources For Learning About Restorative Practices – Help Me Find More

Two Good Pieces Of Simple Writing Advice For Students – Share Your Own

The Question-Asking Exercises I Did With My Students Last Week (Hand-Outs Included)

Two “Must Use” Resources From The UK On Education Research

Here’s an exceptional older post by UK educator/blogger Alex Quigley. It’s titled Questioning – Top Ten Strategies and, as you’ll see, it has to be one of the best and most practical list of recommendations out there. I suspect that many educators, including me, are going to be referring to it often.

8 HABITS OF CURIOUS PEOPLE is from Fast Company, and could be a very accessible article for students to read. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Curiosity.

The Best Ways To Finish The School Year Strong

Managing Student Cellphone Use In Class

Options, Options, Options….

The Purposeful Pause: 10 Reflective Questions to Ask Mid-Lesson is by Angela Stockman.

The Best Resources On – & Advice For Using – Donors Choose (Please Share Your Experiences!)

The Best Commentaries On “Teach Like A Champion” – Help Me Find More

3 Tips to Make Any Lesson More Culturally Responsive (and it’s not what you think!) is by Zaretta Hammond.

You Can Read The Entire Ed Week Chat We Did On Classroom Management

I have previously posted about Richard Byrne’s fabulous search engine for video sites other than YouTube (see If You Don’t Have Teacher Access To YouTube At Your School, Then This Search Engine is a “Must”). He’s just updated it. Now, with the limitations YouTube’s Safety Mode is putting on teachers whose schools have been allowing YouTube, his search engine will be a “go-to” tool for many of us who haven’t needed it previously. You can read about the Safety Mode issue at my unfortunately very popular previous post, Our District Just Activated Awful YouTube Safety Mode – What’s Been Your Experience?

Thinking Creatively About Homework is from John Spencer. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

3 Simple Ways to Differentiate Instruction in Any Class is by A. J. Juliani. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

Lesson On Importance Of Asking Good Questions

American Educator, the quarterly magazine of the American Federation of Teachers, always has interesting and useful articles in it, and this Spring edition is no different. The most useful one to teachers, though, is clearly the one by Daniel Willingham. For The Love Of Reading: Engaging Students in a Lifelong Pursuit is a must-read article for every educator. It’s adapted from his new book, Raising Kids Who Read: What Parents and Teachers Can Do. I’m adding it to The Best Resources Documenting The Effectiveness of Free Voluntary Reading.

Here’s A New Strategy I’m Trying To Help Students Develop Intrinsic Motivation

Good Videos On A Growth Mindset, The Importance Of Learning From Mistakes & A Lot More

The Best Posts On Reading Strategies & Comprehension – Help Me Find More!

It’s “Question Week” – Here Are All My Related “Best” Lists In One Place

The Best Resources On The Educational Value Of Doodling

The Best & Most Useful Free Student Hand-Outs Available Online – Help Me Find More

Expeditionary Learning has created a number free, and good, curriculum units for English Language Arts, Science and Social Studies. You can download them here, and read more about them at Middleweb.

(Not) Blooms. is from The Agility Teaching Toolkit(@ASTsupportaali), and offers a unique perspective on explaining Bloom’s Taxonomy to students. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom.

10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills is an excellent post from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to the close reading list and also toThe Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.

Three-Two-One Is A Simple & Effective Summarizing Strategy

Quote Of The Day: “There Was A Misunderstanding” About CCSS & Non-Fiction Texts

Here’s The Writing Prompt I’m Using With “Smartphones Don’t Make Us Dumb”

Great Article On “Being The Best At Anything” & How I’m Using It In Class

Ways To Prioritize Social Emotional Learning Without Grading It

Should Teachers Be Allowed to Touch Students? is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Posts About The Power Of Light Touches In The Classroom.

Amy Mayer has created what I think is an excellent visual about student choice, and has given me permission to publish it here. You can see/read more of her at work at the FriEdTechnology blog and follow her on Twitter at @friEdTechnology. I originally saw the visual on a tweet by Aaron Brengard.

The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching

I’m going to add this post to two “Best” lists:

The Best Posts & Articles About Providing Students With Choices

The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students

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June 9, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Articles I’ve Written In 2015 — So Far

June 7, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – So Far

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I use short, funny video clips a lot when I’m teaching ELLs, and you can read in detail about how I use them in The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them). In short, there are many ways to use them that promote speaking, listening, writing and reading.

I’ve posted quite a few of them during the first six months of this year, and I thought it would be useful to readers — and to me — if I brought them together in one post.

I’ve also published quite a few during the previous seven years of this blog. You can find those in these lists:

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part Two


The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2012 (Part Two)

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2012 (Part One)

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2011

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2010

Part Two Of The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2009

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2009

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2008

The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development

The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual Or Multilingual — Part One

The Best Pink Panther Fight Scenes For English Language Learners

The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner

The Best Sports Videos To Use With English Language Learners

The Best Video Clips Of Sneaky Critters

The Best Videos Showing “Thinking Outside The Box” — Help Me Find More

The Best Fun Videos To Teach Language Conventions — Help Me Find More

The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie Scenes For Halloween

The Best Christmas Videos For English Language Learners – Help Me Find More

Okay, now here are my choices for The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 — So Far:

I Think The Amazing Card Trick Shown In This Video Could Be Modified Into A Fun ELL Writing Activity

This video has a surprise ending:

“Mr. Line” is a character is a long series of short Italian video animations featuring a long, unbroken, drawn line.

Open Culture blogged about the series, and, except for one (and maybe a few more) that are clearly not appropriate for the classroom, they would be great to show English Language Learners and have them write and talk about what they saw. The character primarily just talks gibberish, and the drawings speak for themselves.

Here’s an example of one (you can access all of them here):

Artoo in Love would be a good video to show English Language Learners and then have them write and talk about what happens in the film:

I’ve previously posted about Simon’s Cat videos and how they’re perfect for English Language Learners.

Here’s a new one:

This would be a fun video to show to English Language Learners and have them describe what they see. It’s in French with with English subtitles, but it’s fun even if you understand the words.

One activity I do with English Language Learners is teach several idioms; then have students use them in sentences of their own creation; and, finally, create literal posters illustrating what they have written.

So, let’s say they write “Please, keep it a secret – don’t let the cat out of the bag!” (note that they use the idiom correctly and include its meaning in the sentence). They would then draw a picture of a cat in a bag with someone talking to another person, along with their caption.

Then, they show it and share it verbally to the class. It can be a lot of fun.

Now, in addition to my drawing a simple model to show to students, I’ll be showing them this wonderful short video called “Confessions Of An Idiom.”

I’ll be adding this post to The Best Sites To Help ELL’s Learn Idioms & Slang.

Confessions of an Idiom from Amanda Koh on Vimeo.

I’ve previously published several posts about having English Language Learners use photos and videos as fun opportunities to invent “thought bubbles” or dialogues. I’ve also published a similar idea in a post titled What Are People In This Painting Thinking?

TED Talks shared a number of short videos they shared at their conference. Some were new, some I had seen and published here, and several would be useful in English Language Learner classes.

Two of those useful for ELLs were from a YouTube channel by Chris Cohen that he calls Animal Translations, where he puts his voice to animal thoughts. The accent is a bit thick, so it might be difficult for ELLs to hear everything, but they’d certainly get the idea. Then, students could create their own internal dialogue they could perform while the video was shown on a screen without sound.

Here the two samples:

A regular feature on this blog has been highlighting all the games that Jimmy Fallon plays on his show that are great ones for English Language Learners.

He recently played another one that most teachers are familiar with — Pictionary.

Show him playing it with several other stars could be a fun model for students prior to playing the game. When I do it, I model a game in front, and then divide the class into groups of three. Then, in the small groups, everyone gets a chance to be the decider/drawer of the word while they play it three times.

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