Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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All My 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place

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Late last month, I began publishing my end-of-year “Best” lists.

I thought readers would find it useful if I began this “compilation” post, and continued to add lists as I publish them.

You might also be interested in:

All Mid-Year 2016 “Best” Lists In One Place

All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place

All Of My “All-Time” Best Lists In One Place!

Here are the lists I’ve published so far – there should be twenty or twenty-five once I’m all done:

The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2016

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2016 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

My Ten Best BAM! Radio Shows In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Fifty Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Resources On Class Instruction In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Year In Review Features — 2016

2016’s Most Popular Posts!

The good — and very, very bad — education news of 2016
The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2016

November 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

Here is a a collection of my favorites from 2013:

A Look Back: “Does Class Size Matter?”

A Look Back: “Five key strategies to get/keep kids engaged at school”

A Look Back: “Using Freire & Fotobabble With English Language Learners”

A Look Back: “Why we can’t all get along over school reform”

A Look Back: “This Is Exactly What I Mean By Connecting Social Emotional Learning & Literacy Instruction….”

A Look Back: “Flowchart For When A Day Goes Bad In Classroom Management”

A Look Back: A Simple & Effective Classroom Lesson On Gratitude

A Look Back: “New Research Shows Why Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and Character Education Are Not Enough”

A Look Back: The Best Posts On Writing Instruction

A Look Back: Surprise, Surprise: Study Finds That Relationships Promote Perseverance & Cash Bonuses Do Not

A Look Back: “Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students”

A Look Back: Giving Teachers the Opportunity to Say “Yes” to Ed Tech

A Look Back: The Differences Between Parent “Involvement” & Parent “Engagement”

A Look Back: “Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom-Management Tips”

A Look Back: “Five ways to get kids to want to read and write”

A Look Back: Knowledge Isn’t Power — “Power is Power”

A Look Back: Classroom Management Strategy: “Sometimes The Only Thing Worse Than Losing A Fight Is Winning One”

A Look Back: “Teacher: How my 9th graders graded me”

November 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

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Here’s my latest end-of-the-year list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2015

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – Part Two

The “All-Time” Best Science Sites

The Best Science Sites Of 2014 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2013 – So Far

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Science Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Science Sites Of 2011

The Best Science Sites Of 2011 — So Far

The Best Science Websites — 2010

The Best Science & Math Sites — 2009

The Best Science & Math Websites — 2008

The Best Science Websites For Students & Teachers — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Science Sites Of 2016 – Part Two (not in any order of preference):

The Best Resources For Learning & Teaching About The Juno Spacecraft.

What Is Missing? is an interactive & multimedia map and timeline of extinct and endangered species. It’s quite ambitious, though perhaps slightly confusing in its navigation tools. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For World Biodiversity Day (& Endangered Species Day).

Zooniverse is an amazing site where scholars put up projects that require “people-powered research” – for example, attempting to decode formerly secret Civil War telegrams. It has many projects in multiple subject areas (including science), along with very cool online tools for students to use when doing the research. The site also has lesson plans for teachers to use when introducing students to the site.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has created The Climate Explorer. Here’s how they describe it:

Explore maps and graphs of historical and projected climate trends in your local area. View data by topics to see how climate change will impact things you care about.

Type in your zip code and you get lots of info, along with accessible explanations for how to interpret it. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Climate Change.

Pioneers of Flight has several interactives, and comes from the Smithsonian. I’m adding them to The Best Resources For Learning About Flight, and I took the opportunity to completely revise and update that list.

Chris Wejr shared this cool video of a school-wide Rube Goldberg Machine. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Rube Goldberg Machines:

The embedded video might not be viewable on an RSS Reader. You can click through to see it or you can also see it on YouTube.

I’m adding this new Business Insider video to The Best Sites For Learning About Voyager 1 & Its Departure From Our Solar System, which I’ve also just updated and revised.

I’m adding this video from NPR to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About World History:

TED-Ed released this lesson and video. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Possible Life On Other Planets.

TED-Ed published a new lesson and video titled “Rosalind Franklin: DNA’s unsung hero.”

It looks like they did a far better job here than on their last video and lesson about an important woman in science: Disappointing New TED-Ed Video & Lesson On Henrietta Lacks.

November 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My Ten Best BAM! Radio Shows In 2016 – Part Two

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As regular readers know, I do a ten-minute weekly BAM! Radio show to accompany my Education Week Teacher columns.

I thought readers might be interested in my choices for the best shows I’ve done in 2016 – Part Two (from the last six months).

You can see all my shows at All My BAM Radio Shows – Linked With Descriptions.

You might also be interested in My Twelve Best BAM! Radio Shows In 2015 and My Ten Best BAM! Radio Shows In 2016 – So Far.

Here are My Ten Best BAM! Radio Shows In 2016 – Part Two (they are not in any particular order):

I Want My Kids to Feel Comfortable Making Mistakes, but… with Doug Lemov, Danny Woo and Kathleen Neagle Sokolowski.

Common Core Strategies for Social Studies Instruction with Ruchi Agarwal-Rangnath, Sarah Cooper and Michael Fisher.

What Will Be the Practical Impact of ESSA in the Classroom? with Barnett Berry and Morgan Polikoff.

What Is Metacognition? Let’s Think About It with Matt Renwick, Laura Robb and Teresa Diaz.

How Skilled Educators Help Students Deal with Trauma with Dr. Jennifer Davis Bowman, Cindi Rigsbee, and Mary Ann Zehr.

6 Ways to Take Your Field Trips from Good to Great with Herb Broda, Anne Jenks, and Jennifer Orr.

11 Smart Tips for Navigating the Ed Tech Jungle with Anna Bartosik, Jared Covili, Sam Patterson.

Handling “Controversial” Issues In The Classroom with Lorena German, Stephen Lazar and Adeyemi Stembridge, Ph.D.

Classroom Management: Cultivating Student Self-Control with Dr. Jennifer Davis Bowman, Bryan Harris and Amanda Koonlaba, M.Ed.

Solutions to the Biggest Challenges Science Teachers Face with Al Gonzalez, Mike Janatovich, Anne Jolly, and Camie Walker.

 

November 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

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Time for another end-of-year ”The Best…” list.

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site, though there is one on this list that doesn’t quite meet this particular criteria.

* be seen by me during the last six months of 2016. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016- Part Two:

The Fiscal Ship was just named of one the top games at the Serious Play Conference. It’s a surprisingly accessible and engaging interactive about (yawn) fiscal policy and the federal budget. Though the majority of its backers appear to be conservative groups, the sponsoring group includes a few others, too. I didn’t play the game all the way through; however, what I did get through seemed to be relatively even-handed without pushing a particular agenda.

Pairprep is a free site that has a number of “courses” (a series of multiple choice questions on a particular topic – like “ESL”) where students can compete against a friend, a random opponent, or themselves as they choose answers. Teachers can monitor student progress through a virtual classroom.

National Geographic has created a page with links to their most engaging and educational games.

Guess What! is the name of a “new” game from Cambridge University Press. I have “new” in parenthesis because it’s a version of a game used with English Language Learners for decades – Taboo – where players have to describe a word without using the word, and others have to guess what is being described. The great twist in “Guess What!” is that students can create videos of them describing a word, upload it, and then have other classes use them as part of their own game (they provide simple instructions).

Pioneers of Flight has several interactive games, and comes from the Smithsonian.

Mission U.S. has created some excellent interactives and some bad ones.  Their newest one is on the Depression.  I haven’t played it, but they seemed to learn some lessons in on how their created their last one on immigration, so I’m going to give them the benefit of the doubt.

GlassLab Games lets educators create virtual classrooms where students can play educational games and have their progress monitored. You can create a free classroom, but only have access to one-or-two of the games, and you can also create a free one with access to all of them for sixty days. For a longer period of time, you need to pay, but the price is not astronomical. I’m not that impressed with the games they have now. However, the well-known game Civilization is creating a specific education version that was supposed to be available on the site in October.

Thanks to Sara-E. Cottrell, I recently learned about Sugarcane, a free web tool that lets you easily create lots of different kinds of learning games, as well as access ones that others have created. It’s owned by IXL Learning, but your school doesn’t have to be subscribed to it in order to use Sugarcane.

Reader Gabrielle Klingelhöfer shared the site Learning Apps with me, and I’m sure glad she did! It’s a free site that lets teachers create virtual classrooms where students can uses lots of different kinds of online exercises and games to learn many subjects. There are tons of already-created exercises divided by subject, and it seems super-easy – and I really mean easy – for teachers to create their own.

A bunch of groups, including museums and the city of London, have cooperated to create The Great Fire of London interactive, which includes what they call a “children’s game,” a Minecraft resource, and a lot of other features.

Brainpop has pulled together a nice collection of online games.

Smithsonian Science has put all their games in one place.

Save

November 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education

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The Associated Press reports that Donald Trump has selected Betsy DeVos to be the next Secretary of of the U.S. Department of Education.

Ugh.

You might also be interested in The Best Articles On What The Trump Presidency Might Mean For Schools.

Here are resources to learn more about her, and I’ll be adding more as they become available:

Betsy DeVos: Five Things to Know About Trump’s Pick for Education Secretary is from Education Week.

What a Betsy DeVos appointment would tell us about Trump’s education plans is from Chalkbeat.

Interview with Betsy DeVos, the Reformer is from The Philanthropy Roundtable.

Trump picks Betsy DeVos for education secretary post is from The Detroit News.

Trump picks billionaire Betsy DeVos, school voucher advocate, as Education Secretary is from The Washington Post.

Why Donald Trump’s Education Pick Would Face Barriers for Vouchers is from The NY Times.

Betsy DeVos, Trump’s Education Pick, Has Steered Money From Public Schools is from The New York Times.

Trump terrifies public school advocates with education secretary pick is by Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post.

Betsy DeVos and the Wrong Way to Fix Schools is by Douglas Harris, and appeared in The New York Times.

November 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 – Part Two

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I use short, funny video clips a lot when I’m teaching ELLs, and you can read in detail about how I use them in The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them). In short, there are many ways to use them that promote speaking, listening, writing and reading (including having students describe – in writing and verbally – a chronological description of what they saw).

I’ve posted a few of them during the second half of this year, and I thought it would be useful to readers — and to me — if I brought them together in one post.

I’ve also published quite a few during the previous ten years of this blog. You can find those in these lists:

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 – So Far

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – So Far

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2014 – Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2013 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2012 (Part Two)

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2012 (Part One)

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2011

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2010

Part Two Of The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2009

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2009

The Best “Fun” Sites You Can Use For Learning, Too — 2008

The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development

The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual Or Multilingual — Part One

The Best Pink Panther Fight Scenes For English Language Learners

The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner

The Best Sports Videos To Use With English Language Learners

The Best Video Clips Of Sneaky Critters

The Best Videos Showing “Thinking Outside The Box” — Help Me Find More

The Best Fun Videos To Teach Language Conventions — Help Me Find More

The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie Scenes For Halloween

The Best Christmas Videos For English Language Learners – Help Me Find More

Okay, now here are my choices for The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2016 — Part Two:

This Planet II video clip from the BBC would be extremely engaging to show to English Language Learners and then have them explain what they saw – in writing and verbally.

I wouldn’t call it “fun,” but it is one of the most thrilling scenes you’re going to see:

Unsatisfying is video that lasts a little over a minute that shares…unsatisfying experiences some of us may have experienced. It would be great to show to English Language Learners and have them describe what happens in the film. You can read more about the video’s background at Vox:

UNSATISFYING from PARALLEL STUDIO on Vimeo.

Videos of animals doing funny things are always a winner with English Language Learners (and their teachers!). Show them and then have students write and talk about what they’ve seen. Here’s one, and it creators also have two playlists of similar animal compilations:

The creators of Wallace and Gromit have posted on YouTube one of the most well-known sequences from their 1993 movie, and it’s a great one to show English Language Learners and have them describe what they see:

I’ve previously posted about how great Simon’s Cat videos are for English Language Learners – have them watch them and write and talk about what happened. Here’s another one:

Slapstick movie scenes – both silent like ones from Charlie Chaplin and others like Pink Panther clips – are great to show English Language Learners to have them write and talk about them.

Now, the internet has brought us this GIF that is sure to become a slapstick classic:

So much happens so fast in it that The Verge has published a second-by-second description at Breaking down the best slapstick GIF we’ve ever seen. You’d have to show it a number of times, but its speed, I suspect, would even make it more engaging to students.

Here’s another Simon’s Cat video:

“For The Birds” is a good video for English Language Learners – they can watch it and, then, describe what they saw. It works well on that kind of “surface” level. In addition, if you want, it can work on a “deeper” level, too, if you want to explore the issue of how we treat others who might look or act differently.

Here’s a change – a scary video:

I’ve got a collection of videos at The Best Video Clips Of Sneaky Critters — Help Me Find More which I use for English Language Learners to view and describe, and for IB Theory of Knowledge students to use for discussions about if animals have ethics.

Here’s a new addition to that list:

I’ve posted many illusions, along with explanations of how I use them with English Language Learners and in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes.

Today, the “Illusion of The Year” was announced and, as I do every year, it’s posted below – prepare to have your mind blown.

But there’s additional treat – someone made a simple video explaining how it was done. That one is also embedded below…

This video about a “a lonely chameleon who struggles to stay visible while seeking the attention of his crush” would be good for English Language Learners to watch and then, afterwards, write and talk about what happened in it:

Invisible from Invisible Film on Vimeo.

November 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

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Here’s one more in my series of mid-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,600 of the lists here).

You might also be interested in these previous posts:

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 — So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Social Studies Sites

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – So Far

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) Related To Social Studies In One Place

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2011

The Best “The Best…” Lists Related To Social Studies — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2009

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2008

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016— So Far (the beginning of the list contains links to several Social Studies related posts I’ve published this year):

The Best Resources For Learning About Bastille Day

The Best Explanations For Why You Shouldn’t Say “All Lives Matter”

The Best Resources On Different Types Of Map Projections

The Best Resources On The Smithsonian’s African-American Museum

The Best Resources & Ideas For Teaching About Current Events

The Best Places Where Students Can Tell Their – And/Or Their Families – Immigration Story

A Collection Of Advice On Talking To Students About Race, Police & Racism

TIME has published its choices for The Most Influential Images of All Time. It includes a variety of features, including videos and a timeline. I’ve added it to The Best Sites To See “Photos That Changed The World,” which I’ve just updated and revised.

The Uprooted is a useful interactive map demonstrating the extent of today’s world refugee crisis. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day.

You can find lots of great post-election lesson resources at the bottom of The Best Sites To Learn About The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections.

The New York Times has created a great learning “game” to help people understand the difficulties many face when they want to vote in the United States. Check out “The Voter Suppression Trail,” done in the style of the classic Oregon Trail game.

How Kids Learn Prejudice is the headline of an important New York Times column. It’s worth reading – not just for what it says, but also for the links it contains to research. I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

Gapminder, the great data visualization site led by Hans Rosling (see The Best Hans Rosling Videos) has unveiled Dollar Street, which I think is an extraordinary site. They have collected 30,000 photos from 46 countries that allow you to compare, as they say, “how people really live.” You can compare bathrooms, toys – you name it. It has so much potential for so many lessons — exploring different cultures, economic analysis, geography, compare/contrast, etc. I’m adding it to:

The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures

The “All-Time” Best Social Studies Sites

Raising Barriers is a three-part interactive video series from the Washington Post that’s appearing this week. It examines the rise of border fences and walls throughout the world. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Walls That Separate Us.

Checkology is an online program of the News Literacy Project. Here’s how they describe it:

NLP’s checkology™ virtual classroom is a place where students discover how to navigate today’s challenging information landscape by using the core skills and concepts of news literacy.

The virtual classroom brings this vital skill set to life through a series of engaging digital experiences that use real-world examples of news and information and guided instruction from journalists and other experts.

You can sign-up for it free to project on a screen and use it as a whole-class exercise, which seems very doable, especially if you have small whiteboards that students can use or, in a higher-tech setting, “clickers.” The program basically a combination of short video clips with interactive questions. You can pay if you want to create a virtual classroom, though the site doesn’t say how much that premium addition would cost. I’m adding it to The Best Tools To Help Develop Global Media Literacy.

Vote Compass is a new interactive from Vox that provides an accessible, though surprisingly sophisticated, way for anybody, including students, to determine where their political beliefs place them on the political spectrum. You can find the tool here and an explanation of it here.

Watch The Debates lets you view all the Presidential debates since 1960, including clips categorized by subject. You can then indicate your thoughts about what is being said, and compare your reactions to others.

The famous New York City Tenement Museum, located near where my father was raised, has just expanded its facility and website. You can read more about it at NBC News, NYC’s Tenement Museum Will Now Showcase a Puerto Rican Migrant Family . Its website has had a somewhat useful activity for quite awhile that’s been on the The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States list. Here’s how I’ve described it:

From Ellis Island To Orchard Street is a simulation from the Tenement Museum in New York City. In the online interactive, users play the role of an early immigrant to the United States. It provides good information about the immigration experience, though I wish the navigation was a little more clear. It might be tricky for English Language Learners.

Now, though, they’ve added some addition very nice resources:

Your Story, Our Story is a digital archive where students can upload images of family objects and their stories.  It has lots of decent free lesson plans to use with it.

It also has a number of lesson plans and resources related to learning to use primary sources.

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States

The Best Resources For Using Primary Sources

The Best Resources For Using “Object Lessons” In History

Free School publishes very good short educational YouTube videos twice each week. The narration is at a reasonable clip, and it has good subtitles, as well.

I don’t think it gets a whole of attention in U.S. school history books, but the Great Fire of London was a pretty big deal. A bunch of groups, including museums and the city of London, have cooperated to create The Great Fire of London interactive, which includes what they call a “children’s game,” a Minecraft resource, and a lot of other features. The game part includes simple text with audio support, so it’s particularly accessible to English Language Learners.

Google  unveiled called The Hidden Worlds Of The National Parks. It’s pretty impressive. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Yosemite & Other U.S. National Parks.

Newsela, the exceptional reading site offering the same article written for different reading levels (see The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels”) has unveiled a new “Library” feature offering similar “levels” of primary source documents. Access is free to all Newsela resources, though you have to register on the site. A fee is required, though, in order to use advanced features like a virtual classroom. You can read more about it at TechCrunch. I’m adding this new resource to The Best Resources For Using Primary Sources.

I haven’t always been the biggest fan of iCivics, the popular learning games site begun by former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. I’ve thought that many (but not all) of their games have been overly-complicated, and they really put their foot in it with a horribly-done one on immigration (see Sandra Day O’Connor’s Site To Change Immigration Game Because Of Your Comments). But they seem to have really stepped-up their “game” recently. Now, teachers can easily create free virtual classrooms and monitor student progress on the site.

The part I’m really excited about is a tool called DB Quest (you can go to the link, but it won’t let you access it until you register, which is free and easy). It’s an interactive to access and learn about primary source documents, and I like it a lot. They only have one lesson there now – on the Nashville Civil Rights Sit-Ins – but have just received funding from the Library of Congress to expand it (I just received that info via a LOC email, but there’s no way to link to it). I hope they develop many more lessons using that DBQuest tool, and I suspect many teachers will agree with me.

Metrocosm has created another neat and simple geographic interactive. It lets you visualize the world in six ways – GDP, government debt, population, births, wealth and billionaires.

Clint Smith has written an important and heavily annotated article in The New Yorker headlined Racism, Stress and Black Death.

Q-Files is a new-to-me free online illustrated encyclopedia with very accessible text and images. It seems quite extensive.

The British newspaper, The Telegraph, has just begun what appears to be a weekly series of videos called Telegraph Time Tunnel. They are publishing two minute videos with images and simple text reviewing major events that occurred that same week sometime within the past one hundred years. It’s not as complete as the other resources on The Best “Today In History” Sites, but it could still be useful. They also have a YouTube playlist for the videos, but it seems to have a delay to adding new ones there. So it might be better to view them off the Telegraph site itself.

What did I miss?

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