Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 29, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Best Resources For Learning How The Every Student Succeeds Act Affects English Language Learners

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There has been a lot written about The Every Student Succeeds Act (The Best Resources On The No Child Left Behind Reauthorization Process), though not as much on how it will affect English Language Learners.

Here’s a start (and I’ll be adding more):

New Version Of “No Child Left Behind” Passes House – Includes Changes For English Language Learners is a post I wrote earlier this month.

Here’s a summary from the American Federation of Teachers on how the new law will affect ELLs.

TESOL Releases Statement on Every Student Succeeds Act

The Every Student Succeeds Act and Dual Language Learners is from Ed Central.

New education law puts more pressure on states to serve English learners is from Ed Source.

ELL Advocates Hopeful and Wary of New Federal K-12 Law is from Ed Week.

New Federal K-12 Law Fails to Address ‘Value of Bilingualism,’ ELL Scholars Say is from Ed Week.

What does ESSA mean for ELLs? is from Colorin Colorado.

Hope for English-Language Learners is from U.S. News.

December 28, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2015

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I’m not quite done with “Best of 2015″ lists (you can see over twenty of them at All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place).

Here are The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2015 (you might also be interested in The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2014):

I’ve got to start off with the annual list I do every year for The Washington Post (this year’s column also has links to all my wrap-ups for previous years’, too): Best and worst education news of 2015 — a teacher’s list

What they said in 2015: Diverse voices on education reform is from Ed Source.

Education in 2015 Visualized is from The Atlantic.

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015 is from Audrey Watters.

Top education news stories of 2015, to an historian is by Sherman Dorn.

The 6 education stories that got New York talking in 2015 is from Chalkbeat.

A year of change: EdSource’s top five stories of 2015
is from Ed Source.

The Teaching Profession in 2015 (in Charts) is from Ed Week.

Education Year 2015 in Review: What Were the Upticks and Downticks? is from Canada, and written by Paul W. Bennett.

December 27, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – Part Two

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This list focuses on sites that ELL students would use directly. Of course, many other sites on my other lists can also be used effectively with ELL’s.

I’ll be adding this post to All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – So Far

The Best Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced English Language Learner Sites

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2014 – So Far

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2013 – So Far

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2012 — Part One

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2011

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students — 2010

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students — 2009

The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2008

The Best Internet Sites For English Language Learners — 2007

The Best Web 2.0 Applications for ESL/EFL Learners — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – Part Two (not a very long list from over the past six months):

This school year, all my NY Times posts are self-access interactives for ELLs.

AlfaTyping looks like a nice tool for students to develop typing skills, and you can read all about it at Richard Byrne’s post. I’m adding it both to The Best Eleven Websites For Students To Learn About Computers (where you can find other typing sites) and to The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

GrammarFlip is a new site that lets teachers create virtual classrooms for their students to learn and practice grammar skills. It’s very simple to create multiple free classrooms where students can watch grammar videos and then answer questions about that particular grammar topic.

The BBC’s “Skillwise” site has a great collection of English games that would be accessible to Intermediate and Advanced English Language Learners. I’m adding the link to The Best Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced English Language Learner Sites, and am a bit surprised it isn’t already there.

Thanks to Jim Bentley, I learned about Karen Ogen‘s nice collection of learning games called Interactive Sites For Education.

Test Your Vocab is an online tool where learners can get a rough estimate of how many words they know in English. I think it could be a useful tool for students to periodically use to measure their progress and get re-energized when they see how much they’re making. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where ELL’s Can Learn Vocabulary. I discovered it through Nina English’s blog, which I learned about through David Deubelbeiss, founder of the great EFL Classroom 2.0.

December 27, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2015 – Part Two

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Another day, another end-of-year “The Best…” list…..

I’ll be adding this post to All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Websites For English Language Learner Students In 2015 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2013 – So Far

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2012 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2011 — Part One

The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s — 2010

The Best Sites For Teachers Of English Language Learners — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELL’s In 2015 – Part Two:

I’ve got to start off with All My NY Times Posts For English Language Learners – Linked With Descriptions.

I’ve written a guest post for Edutopia titled 5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Videos for ELL Classrooms.

Creativity in the English language classroom is a new Ebook from The British Council that looks very helpful. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping Students Strengthen & Develop Their Creativity.

8 guaranteed ways to enhance teenage learner motivation in the language class is by ELL educator Adam Simpson and, if you’re a teacher of English Language Learners, it will really be one of the most useful posts you’ll read this year. In fact, it’s so good that I’m adding the link to The “All-Time” Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of English Language Learners.

Thanks to Tas Viglatzis, I learned about this Language Magazine article, Bilingualism Boosts U.S. Labor Market.

The article summarizes a new study from the Educational Testing Service which, surprisingly, is not behind a paywall. You can read Is There Really a Labor Market Advantage to Being Bilingual in the U.S.?

I haven’t had a chance to read the entire report, but here’s an excerpt from the Language Magazine summary:

Bilinguals-who-can-read

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning The Advantages To Being Bilingual Or Multilingual.

12 Fun Speaking Games for Language Learners is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.

Video & Transcript Of Exceptional Speech By Pres. Obama At Naturalization Ceremony

The Fifteen Tech Tools & Non-Tech Resources I Use Most Often With My Students

How can film help you teach or learn English? is by Kieran Donaghy at the British Council. I’m adding it to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL.

Video for the English classroom is by James Keddie at the British Council. I’m adding it to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL.

Tips for Connecting With Non-English-Speaking Parents is By Anabel Gonzalez and appeared in Education Week.

Katie Hull Sypnieski and I have finished reviewing the “copy-edits” of our forthcoming book, Navigating The Common Core With English Language Learners (available for pre-order on Amazon). It will be out in March, 2016.

Using a Murder Mystery to Teach Grammar is about an ESL class, and is from The Atlantic.

Unfortunately, I don’t remember who shared Front Row on Twitter a few months ago. I finally got around to looking it over, and it seems like a useful site.It provides tons of English and Math activities for students, and the ability for teachers to create virtual classrooms and monitor student progress. Unfortunately, in the free version for English, teachers can only assign five activities each month — you have to pay for more. I’m not sure what the math restrictions are… I’m adding this info to both The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress and to The Best MATH Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress.

Eight Ways to Support English Language Learners is an infographic from Where Learning Clicks. I’m adding it to The Best Infographics About Teaching & Learning English As A Second (or Third!) Language.

My ELL Gratitude Lesson – With Student Handout

Ekuwah Moses writes a great description of the Picture Word Inductive Model instructional strategy. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.

Infographics about English is a nice collection from Pearson English. I’m adding it to The Best Infographics About Teaching & Learning English As A Second (or Third!) Language.

Creative strategies for encouraging English learners to talk about and apply their learning is from Education Northwest. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Use “3-2-1″ As An Instructional Strategy.

Reading & Writing About El Salvador With Salvadoran Refugees

The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – Part Two

The Effects of Changing Test-Based Policies for Reclassifying English Learners is an important research paper on the dangers of reclassifying ELLs (in other words, not providing extra support any longer to them).

Coincidentally, The Council of Chief State School Officers (the organization behind the creation of the Common Core Standards) has released recommendations on how states and school districts should reclassify English-language learners. You can read all about it at Ed Week.

Adam Simpson has written a useful academic paper titled THE CHARACTERISTIC OF AN EXEMPLARY TEACHER: WHAT ARE THEY?

Very Important New Report On Looking At ELLs Through A Lens Of Assets & Not Deficits

The “All-Time” Best Resources On English Language Learners & The Common Core

Here’s another new online game from Russel Tarr’s ClassTools site: It’s called Connect Fours and is based on a BBC game show that I’ve posted about previously in “Only Connect” Is A Great Game For The Classroom. As I wrote then, the concept of the game was great was for English Language Learners, but the online BBC game itself was too advanced for them. I had suggested, though, that it would be easy for students and teachers to create their own versions with paper and pencil, and I’ve done that numerous times in my classes. Thankfully, though, Russel has now created a super-easy version that teachers and students can use to make their own online without having to register. In the game, there are sixteen squares with words on each one. The player needs to use the words to create four categories of four words each. It’s a great game that helps develop the higher-order thinking skill of categorization.

“Metacognition, Learning Strategies And Student Autonomy” Is My New British Council Post

Oral Reading In The Mainstream & ELL Classroom

ELL World History Video Project: The Epic Of Gilgamesh

Video & Student Hand-Out For A Fairly Creative ELL Geography Project

New Study Finds Interesting Twist: Repeating Words Helps, & Repeating Them To Someone Is Better

Video: ELL Geography Students Using Academic Language To Describe Climate In Their Home Countries

Examples Of Student Work From My ELL History Classes

Bill Eliminating CA High School Exit Exam Passes Legislature – Will Result In HUGE Increase In ELL Student Motivation

California’s Smarter Balanced Test Results Released – Not Good News For ELLs & Others

The New Voice Typing Feature In Google Docs Is Great – I Wonder If ELLs Can Use It For Pronunciation Practice?

A Writing & Speaking Activity For Welcoming Back ELLs

Video: “How Language Makes Your Brain Bigger”

Statistic Of The Day: How Long Does It Take To Learn English?

Links To The Joint Projects My ELL Geography Class Did With Classes Around The World – Want To Join Us This Year?

Jigsaw Puzzles As A Language-Learning Activity

Here’s How My ELL Beginner/Intermediate Class Evaluated Me

Here Are The Results Of Anonymous Class Evaluations From My English Language Learner History Class

Is There A Law Saying Every Government Report On Ed Has To Be Written In A Way That Nobody Wants To Read It?

34 experts offer their tips for English fluency is from Fluency MC (my tip is included).

Gif Lingua is now open for business! is from David Deubelbeiss.

Super quick motivating activities: ‘What do you know about…’ is by Adam Simpson.

15 Academic Vocabulary Resources is from TESOL. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Correcting students’ errors is from French Teacher. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On ESL/EFL/ELL Error Correction.

The future of language is from the Washington Post, and it’s fascinating.

ESL Yes has lots, and I mean lots, of free resources accessible to English Language Learners, including short stories with follow-up interactives.

A new study came out about how people “navigate misunderstandings.” I think, with a little work and thought, ELL teachers can use it with our students. Many are often embarrassed to ask for clarification when they don’t at first understand what is said to them in English. I wonder if we could use this study to point out that even native English speakers don’t understand what others are saying – in English — all the time! Here are two useful articles about the study:

Language Correction Leads To Universal Words is from NPR.

What Did You Say? is from The Atlantic.

Here is Katherine Bilsborough on no-prep activities at this British Council post.

Great reading strategies: ‘First lines’ for developing comprehension is by Adam Simpson.

Free ebook – PARSNIPs in ELT: Stepping out of the Comfort Zone (vol. 1) is also by Adam Simpson. What does PARSNIPs stands for?

This is the lovely acronym for Politics, Alcohol, Religion, Sex, Narcotics, -Isms, and Pork. These are the DMZ of the ELT world, the no-go zones where coursebook publishers fear to tread (in case they lose customers)

I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On How To Teach “Controversial” Topics.

Here’s a great list of speaking activities from The British Council. I’m adding them to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.

Sentence Frames is a site for Portland (OR) teachers that seems to have a good amount of useful resources for ELLs.

Tools Of The Trade is a post from the Harvard School of Education and reviews free UDL (Universal Design For Learning) online tools that would be useful for English Language Learners and others.

English Worksheets Land has a lot of free decent worksheets suitable for English reinforcement. You don’t have to register before gaining access to them. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Free ESL/EFL Hand-Outs & Worksheets.

For teachers of English learners, Common Core means double the work is from The Hechinger Report.

 

 

December 27, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – Part Two

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I continue my end-of-year “The Best…” lists…

I’ll be adding this post to All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place.

You might want to explore The Best Resources On Class Instruction – 2015, too.

The title of this “The Best…” list is pretty self-explanatory. What you’ll find here are blog posts and articles this year (some written by me, some by others) that were, in my opinion, the ones that offered the best practical advice and resources to teachers this year — suggestions that can help teachers become more effective in the classroom today or tomorrow. Some, however, might not appear on the surface to fit that criteria, but those, I think, might offer insights that could (should?) inform our teaching practice everyday.

For many, the headlines provide enough of an idea of the topic and I haven’t included any further description.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2014 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2013 – So Far

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers In 2011

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2010

The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice To Teachers — 2009

In addition, you might find these useful:

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice In 2011

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2010

The Best Reflective Posts I’ve Written About My Teaching Practice — 2009

Here are my choices for The Best Articles (And Blog Posts) Offering Practical Advice & Resources To Teachers In 2015- Part Two:

The Fifteen Tech Tools & Non-Tech Resources I Use Most Often With My Students

Teaching Channel Video: “Wingman” Is A Great Small Group Discussion Activity

Here’s A Stephen Curry Quote Teachers Can Use With Their Students!

I’ve got to include my BAM! Radio shows and my Education Week Teacher advice column.

How My University Students Evaluated Me This Semester

The Best Resources For Using “Object Lessons” In History

No Surprise To Teachers: Study Finds That Helping One Or Two Students Can Make Entire Class Better

The Best Sites To Learn About The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections

Skills and Strategies | The Four-Corners Exercise to Inspire Writing and Discussion is from The New York Times Learning Network.

The Best Resources For Helping Students Learn How Best To Study

Shocker – NOT: New Study Finds That Lectures Are Not Best Instructional Strategy

The Educational Value Of Students Creating “What If?” Scenarios

Quote Of The Day: Attorney Journal Loretta Lynch On Anti-Muslim Bullying In Schools

What is ‘Breaking the Plane’? is by Doug Lemov. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Classroom Management.

Statistic Of The Day: Diversity Helps Us Learn

Big New Report Issued On Social Emotional Learning

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies is by Jennifer Gonzalez. I’m adding it to The Best Resources Sharing The Best Practices For Fruitful Classroom Discussions.

Doug Lemov has a nice post on using touch in the classroom. I’m adding it to The Best Posts About The Power Of Light Touches In The Classroom.

All My “Best” Lists On Race, Racism & The Civil Rights Movement – In One Place

New Study Says Emphasize Quality Over Quantity In Teaching Writing, But I Don’t Think That’s Most Important Finding

This Is A Useful Video For Students To Learn The Advantages Of Asking For Help

Are you guilty of these 12 microaggressions? is from Mashable.

Learning From The Past To Inform Our Present Response To Refugees

Good Quote From Ta-Nehisi Coates On Writing & How I’m Using It In Class

Part Two Of Best Teaching Resources On Paris Attacks

If You Ever Have Difficult Conversations With Students Or Colleagues, You’ll Want To Read This

Jo Boaler, a math professor at Stanford, recently released this great video. Though it talks about math, it would be a good one to show to any class – it’s a good intro to Social Emotional Learning I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Showing Students That They Make Their Brain Stronger By Learning.

Student Agency & How To Encourage It

Does Your Principal Support Teachers Developing A Growth Mindset?

Quotes Of The Day: The Kansas City Royals Manager Sounds Like An Excellent Teacher

“The Science Of Learning” Is A Must-Read (& An Accessible One) For Teachers

This Is A Great Article On The Benefits Of Reading Books & Here Is How I’m Going To Use It

This Is A Really Useful Article On Giving Student Feedback

“How Can I Better A Better Teacher For You?”

“ReadWorks.org” Looks Like A Good Source Of Free Reading Passages For Social Studies

Here’s The Form I’m Giving To Most Students Who Want Me To Write A Letter Of Recommendation

My New Classroom Management Strategy: “How Are You Going To Use Your Power?”

This Is Interesting: “8 Strategies Robert Marzano & John Hattie Agree On”

Excellent Article On Listening AND Writing Prompt I’ll Be Having Students Use With It

A Nice Video On The Importance Of Asking Questions – & An Accompanying Writing Prompt

“I Could Do That” Is A Great Video For Anyone Interested In Close Reading (& For TOK Teachers)

“Teach This Poem” Provides A Weekly Poem & Learning Activities To Teachers – For Free

Two Good Articles – & A Student Writing Prompt – On The Importance Of Reading

Surprise, Surprise – Punishment May Not Be The Best Parenting (Or Teaching) Strategy

A Great Piece On Student Boredom & The Writing Prompt I’m Using With It

Graphic Organizers Supporting The Common Core – Help Me Find More

New Study Shows Goal-Setting – With Some Twists – Can Have Big Impact On Student Achievement

“They Say, I Say” Is A Great Writing Resource

Questions To Help With Positive Classroom Management

December 26, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2015

The-Best

zaretta11111

It’s that time of year again — time to share the choices from readers of this blog for the best education-related book they read in the this past year.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2014

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2013

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2012

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2011

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2010

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2009

The Best Education-Related Books Visitors To This Blog Read In 2008

I’m also adding this post to All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place.

My choice is Culturally Responsive Teaching & The Brain by Zaretta Hammond. You can read an interview I did with the author here.

Now, here are the choices of many readers who sent their comments and tweets (even if you didn’t send them in earlier, you can still leave your favorites in the comments):

Heather Gauck:

Digital Leadership by Eric Sheninger. Amazing tips and direction for educational transformation.

Shelly Buchanan:

Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education by Sir Ken Robinson. Please read. Right away.

Kris Giere:

This is Not a Test by Jose Vilson. It resonated with me on so many levels and does well to remind us of the complexity and intersectionality of life as an educator.

Matt Renwick:

The Prize
by Dale Russakoff is a balanced, close observation of how Newark schools spent the $100 million gift from Mark Zuckerberg. That the funds made little to no impact on the daily lives of students is both sad and surprising. Russakoff doesn’t pit charter schools vs. public schools, but rather shines a light on the realities of operating a large urban district plagued by poverty.

Jim Bentley:

Make Just One Change By Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana. The QFT (Question Formulation Texhnique) is a powerful way to get students asking deep questions and guiding inquiry.

George Panagiotakopoulos:

“Why Don’t Students Like School?: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom”

By Daniel Willingham. This is an amazing book which answers so many questions about teaching and learning. It is a cognitive psychologist’s point of view about how learning can be more efficient and how a teacher can maximize her contribution to students’ learning. I think that it is a book which every teacher must read!!

Jaime:

The best book I read is “The Motivated Brain: Improving Student Attention, Engagement, and Perseverance” by Gayle Gregory, Martha Kaufeldt

Bill L:

Finally got to Mike Schmoker’s Focus. Glad I read it.

Breanna Lukes:

A Path Appears by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn. Amazing book about doing the most good by focusing our time, energy, and money where it will make the most impact. These writers and the amazing people and organizations they discuss leave readers beieving that the world is full of hope and kindness, despite what the media might report.

Lisa Pettifer:

2015 produced a lot of edu reading that I found challenging, nourishing or affirming. More challenging in places than Headstrong by Dame Sally Coates, more nourishing than John Tomsett’s Love Over Fear and far more affirming than anything else was Flip the System, a collection of essays edited by René Kneyber and Jelmer Evers, and with a range of contributors including Gert Biesta, Tom Bennett, Mark Priestley and Carol Campbell. This book made my summer. It rarely leaves my side. It offers enormous hope that the teaching profession can heal itself, direct itself and monitor itself…

Sara Hjelm:

This was hard.. I read so many good books this year. In the end there are two, both powerful enough to get hashtags of their own on Twitter; David Daidau’s #WrongBook and #FlipfheSystem. David’s book filled my summer, a slow read while the rain poured down, but Flip the System has been my constant companion ever since I got it and still is, so in the end that is my choice. Get it, read it and let it flip your thinking! Go Flip the System!

Thanks to everyone who contributed!

Again, feel free to share your own recommendations in the comments section…

December 25, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Education Predictions For 2016

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Along with reviews of major education news from the past year (see mine at the Washington Post, Best and worst education news of 2015 — a teacher’s list), there are also various predictions being made for 2015. I thought I’d begin a collection here.

You might also be interested in my list from last year, The Best Education Predictions For 2015.

And, of course, I’ll be adding this list to All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place.

This year’s list will begin today with just a couple of links, but I’ll be adding to it over the next week….

I have to start off with my own list of predictions that was published in The Washington Post, Eight education predictions (and some wishful thinking) for 2016 — a teacher’s list.

Outlook 2016: Education trends for the new year is from District Administration.

Predictions, Dumb and Otherwise, about Technology in Schools in 2025 is by Larry Cuban.

5 K-12 trends to watch in 2016 is from Education Dive.

6 Education Stories To Watch In 2016 is from NPR.

Let me know what I should be adding to this list…

December 24, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – Part Two

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It’s time for another “Best” list to add to All My 2015 “Best” Lists In One Place.

Here are my previous TOK-related “Best” lists:

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources — 2010

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2011

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – So Far

The Best Commentaries On The New IB Theory Of Knowledge Teaching Guide

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Movies For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes – What Are Your Suggestions?

The Best Posts On IB Theory Of Knowledge Oral Presentations

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – So Far

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Posts On Teaching TOK “Knowledge Questions”

The Best Theory Of Knowledge Resources In 2015 – So Far

Here are my picks from the past six months:

The National Review tweeted out this incredibly misleading chart on climate change:

It’s perfect for when we study misleading statistics and graph. You can read more about this at The Washington Post’s Why this National Review’s global temperature graph is so misleading.

As regular readers know, I am continually adding to Over 2,000 Categorized Resources For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes.

Neil deGrasse Tyson published a short piece in The Huffington Post titled What Science Is — and How and Why It Works. It’s a very safe bet that it will be used as required reading in many IB Theory of Knowledge classes when the definition of “knowledge” is discussed. And I’d bet dollars to donuts that many teachers will be using this accessible column in many other classes, too.

Here’s an excerpt:

Objective-truths-exist

The Virtue of Contradicting Ourselves is the headline of a column by Adam Grant in The New York Times. It’s a great piece to use when discussing “knowledge” in IB Theory of Knowledge classes, and I’m going to use in one of the upcoming lessons for English Language Learners that I write for The New York Times Learning Network. Plus, it offers wisdom that’s good for all of us to keep in mind.

Here’s an excerpt:

Intelligence-is-often

One assignment I learned about at my original IB Theory of Knowledge training was having groups of students invent a classroom appropriate product and have them create a short commercial four of the fallacies that we have studied. I have each group show their video, and then they call on people to identify the fallacies used in it.

Here’s an example of one from this year:

Fallacy Video – Tape

I’m adding it to The Best Multimedia Resources For Learning About Fallacies — Help Me Find More.

I have my IB Theory of Knowledge students work in groups to prepare weekly presentations on our textbook chapters that they read for homework. When we were discussing the role of emotion in the search for knowledge, one of the presentation groups was asked if emotion is sometimes like a voice in our heads that we have to control. I then showed this clip from the National Press Club, which is a perfect example of that in action.

Grammar, Morals & History

This post will be useful when studying history: The Best Posts & Articles On The Textbook That Calls Slaves “Workers”

NPR published A Discoverer Of The Buckyball Offers Tips On Winning A Nobel Prize. It’s a good piece, with a great quote that’s ideal for IB Theory of Knowledge classes:

I-think-the-most

TOK teachers might be interested in this post and the accompanying comments:  Calling All Theory Of Knowledge Teachers: How Did You Feel About How IB Examiners Scored Essays This Year?

Here are some useful resources I use in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes, and they are also applicable to other classes:

First, many teachers are familiar with the Jigsaw cooperative learning activity. You can learn more about it at The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas. It’s a regular activity I use in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes (and my ESL courses, too). With my TOK classes, I’ll often print out articles related to the Way Of Knowing or Area of Knowledge topic we’re studying (you can access my Over 2,000 Categorized Resources For IB Theory Of Knowledge Classes here). Then, I distribute these instructions, which pretty much explain how the Jigsaw activity is organized.

Secondly, we spend a few days studying Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. You can see many of those resources at our TOK class blog, along with examples of student videos – they have to create modern versions of it. This year’s students will be showing their own creations on Monday, and I’ll be adding some of them to that class blog post. Students viewing the videos will be using this anonymous evaluation form, which will be completed after each video is viewed, collected, and given to the video’s creators.

“8-Bit Philosophy” Is A Useful Series of Videos

TED-Ed released this excellent video and lesson — perfect for IB Theory of Knowledge classes when studying language:

This video would be a useful one to show when discussing indigenous knowledge systems in IB Theory of Knowledge classes:

In IB Theory of Knowledge classes we examine in both math and human sciences how people taking polls/surveys can manipulate the answers. Here’s a video that would be a nice introduction to the topic (after first explaining to U.S. students the definition of “National Service”):

This video is from PBS, and is a great one for IB Theory of Knowledge teachers when exploring the arts:

Here’s A Writing Prompt I’m Using With My TOK Students On The First Day Of Class

Here’s a good video on perception for teachers of IB Theory of Knowledge classes:

Tons Of Resources On Both The Milgram & Stanford Prison Experiments

“Don’t Judge Too Quickly” Is A Great Series Of Videos For TOK & ELL Students