Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Most Popular Posts From This Blog In 2017 – So Far

As part of my mid-year “Best” lists, I always include a listing of the most popular posts from this blog during the first six months.

Here they are:

1. The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

2. The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom

3. The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures

4. The Best Online Virtual “Corkboards” (or “Bulletin Boards”)

5. The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels”

6. Big Meta-Analysis Says Four Teaching Strategies Are Most Effective For Low-Income Students

7. Now This Is A Student Goal-Setting Strategy That May Actually Work

8. The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL

9. The Best Movie Scenes To Use For English-Language Development

10. Simple & Effective Speaking Rubric For Class Presentations

11. The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016 – So Far

12. The Best Sites For Teaching About Latitude & Longitude

13. The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

14. The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress

15. The Best Education Articles From “The Onion”

16. The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom

17. The Best Sites For Grammar Practice

18. “Unpaywall” Is New Tool For Accessing Research Papers For Free

19. The Best News/Current Events Websites For English Language Learners

20. Answers To “What Do You Do On The First Day Of School?”

 

May 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – So Far

Time for another mid-year ”The Best…” list.

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site.

* be seen by me during the first six months of 2017. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017- So Far (Unlike in previous years, this is a very short list.  I hope the “Part Two” section at the end of this year is a longer one):

Quiznetic is a Kahoot-like tool that lets you create learning games in various racing forms. Students can then “race” each other in answering the questions and see their positions. It appears to be free, and seems simple to use.

Legends of Learning is a new site that provides custom-built games organized by learning objectives. Teachers can create “playlists” they want their students to access and then monitor their progress. They only have science-related games right now, but plan on adding more related to other subjects soon. You can read more about it at USA Today’s article, ‘Spotify for learning games’ coming to classrooms.  It appears the site is free for a month or so after registration (longer if you have fewer students) and then you have to review games, perform other services for the site, or pay per student.

Kupiter lets you easily create Asteroids-like games – without having to register. All you have to do is create some questions. Unfortunately, the answers have to spelled out – so it takes awhile to play.

 

May 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017 – So Far

Here’s one more in my series of mid-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,700 of the lists here).

You might also be interested in these previous posts:

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2015 — So Far

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — So Far

The “All-Time” Best Social Studies Sites

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – So Far

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) Related To Social Studies In One Place

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2011

The Best “The Best…” Lists Related To Social Studies — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2009

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2008

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2017— So Far:

“History does not move on the machinations of a select group of great people”

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The North Korea Missile Crisis

The Global Jukebox is an amazing repository of folks songs from all over the world. They’re organized in a couple of ways, including geographically. Here’s how they describe themselves:

The Global Jukebox pays tribute to the expressive styles of all peoples within the framework of cultural equity and the diversity which is crucial to our survival as a species.

You can read more about it at Open Culture’s post, New, Interactive Web Site Puts Online Thousands of International Folk Songs Recorded by the Great Folklorist Alan Lomax. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

Google unveiled a huge redesign of Google Earth. The changes include being now completely browser-based, letting you see the world in 3-D, and providing guided “Voyager” tours. You can read more about the changes at:

Introducing the New Google Earth, Google Maps Mania

Redesigned Google Earth brings guided tours and 3D view to Chrome browsers and Android devices, The Verge

In The Best “Lists Of Lists” Of History’s Most Influential People, Events & Ideas, I share good models that I use for models – or just ideas – for student projects. Here are a few additions:

25 Moments That Changed America is from TIME.

Ancient World Maps that Changed the World: See Maps from Ancient Greece, Babylon, Rome, and the Islamic World is from Open Culture.

The Best Resources On The Famine Threatening 20 Million People & How To Help

The Best Resources Showing Conflicts Around The World

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Fighting Islamophobia In Schools

25 Mini-Films for Exploring Race, Bias and Identity With Students is an important collection of videos and accompanying lesson plans from The New York Times Learning Network. It’s not to be missed… I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

The Atlantic unveiled the “Life Timeline” interactive. Use a “drop-and-drag” menu to input your birthday, and it will deliver a visually engaging history of the key events that have happened during your lifetime. The timeline includes political, cultural, technological and other kinds of developments, along with an intriguing short summary. You can read more about the Life Timeline tool here. As we all know, teenagers love to talk and write about themselves, and this tool could be an intriguing personal hook to connect with history. It doesn’t really fit into The Best “Today In History” Sites list, but I can’t think of a better place to put it.

There are lots of ideas we want our students to learn about being an active citizen, and strategies for achieving social change is one of them (see The Best Posts & Articles On Building Influence & Creating Change and The Best Websites For Learning About Civic Participation & Citizenship).

Kathryn Schulz published an excellent analysis and guide for effective ways to communicate with your congressperson in The New Yorker – What Calling Congress Achieves. I wouldn’t use the whole piece in class, but excerpts would be very engaging.

How to Make Your Congressman Listen to You is also very good, and much more accessible – it’s a series of tweets from a former Congressional staffer.

The Best Practical Resources For Helping Teachers, Students & Families Respond To Immigration Challenges

The Best Resources On The Trump Administrations New Immigration Enforcement Policies

I Really Like How SAS Curriculum Pathways Site Incorporates Knowledge Transfer In Social Studies

GlobalXplorer is a crowdsourced tool supported by TED that lets users search satellite imagery for signs of looting so that archaeological sites can be saved. The first country they are searching is Peru. It seems like it would be an excellent student project – the geographic “tiles” that are searched don’t seem too big, the “training” required (watching a short video) seems pretty easy, and the supplemental materials from National Geographic about Peru are ideal for Geography class. You can read more about the project at TED. In many ways, the project is similar to Zooniverse, another crowdsourced site for “citizen” science and social science projects (see “Zooniverse” Is One Of The Coolest Ed Sites On The Web – I Can’t Believe I’m Just Hearing About It!).

The Best Resources For Learning About The Spanish-American War

The Best “Around The World” Videos

“What If?” History Projects

“Good Judgment” Is A Site Where Our Students Can Showcase Their Forecasting Skills

The Best Videos For Learning About Civil Disobedience

The Best Resources For Learning About President Trump’s Executive Orders On Immigration & Refugees

A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On The Women’s March

Guest Post: Social Studies & The Common Core (With Downloadable Lessons)

Guest Post: Exploring Cultural Values with Students (With Hand-Outs)

The Best Sites For Learning About The Presidential Inauguration – 2017

Max Roser at “Our World In Data” has really done an impressive job highlighting key indicators at his “A history of global living conditions in 5 charts.” In addition, he has created a chart summarizing the global development over the last 200 years as the story of 100 people (available at the same link). I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About World History and to The Best Sites That Show Statistics By Reducing The World & The U.S. To 100 People.

Radio Garden is an online interactive map of radio stations that you can listen to from around the world. It’s pretty nifty, and you can read more about it at The Atlantic’s article, The Map That Lets You Listen to the Radio Everywhere. It would be a good companion to Radiooooo, one of the coolest music sites around. You can click a country on a world map and then click a decade from the past 120 years, and it will then play music from that area and from that time period. Both of them are now at The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

The Best Resources – Critical & Positive – For Teaching With “Moana”

The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The Standing Rock Protests\

 

May 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2017 – So Far

Time for my third mid-year “Best” list this year.

You might also be interested in:

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2016 – Part Two

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2016 – So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2015 – Part Two

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2015 – So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2014 – Part Two

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2014 – So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2013 – Part Two

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2013 — So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2012 — So Far

My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2011

Here are my choices for My Best Posts On New Research Studies In 2017 – So Far:

Big Meta-Analysis Says Four Teaching Strategies Are Most Effective For Low-Income Students

Statistic Of The Day: School Bullying Reduced

The Best Resources For Learning About The Value Of “Self-Explanation”

New Research Suggests That “Community Trust” Enhances Self-Control & Long-Term Thinking

New Study Finds That Threats & Using Guilt Tend Not To Produce Student Engagement – Duh!

Here’s a simple way to boost your learning from videos: “Prequestion” is from BPS Digest. Daniel Willingham writes about the same study. I’m adding both links to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL, where you’ll find other resources related to effective student video viewing.

The Best Resources Explaining Why We Need To Support The Home Language Of ELLs

The Importance Of “Purpose”

Quote Of The Day: Bilingual Is Better!

Another Study Highlights Importance Of Teacher Diversity

The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On John Hattie’s Research

“Unpaywall” Is New Tool For Accessing Research Papers For Free

Another Unsurprising Research Result: Students Less Likely To Drop-Out If Teachers Encourage Them To Continue

The Best Resources For Learning About The Issue Of “Learning Styles”

New Report Connecting SEL To Standards Should Be On “Must-Read” List For Most Educators

Nice Article On Metacognition

Video: “This is what happens to your brain when you stop exercising”

What ‘Scarcity’ Does To The Mind & Why Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough

Quote Of The Day: Reflection Is Important

Teaching Critical Thinking In History Reduces Belief In Pseudoscience

New Study: The Milgram Experiment Is Replicated

How P.A. Announcements Affect Student Learning

The Best Resources For Learning About Teacher Action Research – Help Me Find More

New Study On Reading Takes Right Idea & Messes It Up

Study Finds That It’s True: Good Teaching Conditions For Educators Equals Good Learning Conditions For Students

New Study Reaffirms What Teachers Know: Relationships Matter

You’ll Want To Read This Interview With Education Researcher Kirabo Jackson

Another Depressing Statistic On Wealth Inequality

No Surprise: Study Finds That If Teachers Show Bias, Then Students Don’t Trust Them Or School

Finally, Developing Leadership Is Recognized as Improving Educational Outcomes! is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On “Teacher Leadership” — Contribute More!

New Study Connects Growth Mindset & “Bouncing Back” From Mistakes

Yet Another Study Finds Advantages To Being Bilingual

Study Finds Lecturing Not Best Way To Teach – Shocking (NOT!)

Surprise – NOT! Study Finds That Money Matters To Education

Quote Of The Day: Studying & Listening To Music Don’t Mix

New Study Finds Connection Between Empathy & Self-Control

Big New – & Useful – Federal Report Out Today On Helping Students Develop Self-Regulation Skills

Statistic Of The Day: Less Physical Activity For Boys Equals Less Academic Achievement

Statistic Of The Day: This One Should Make Everyone Learning A New Language Happy

“Practitioners’ Instincts, Observations” Have Important Role In Research

Mathematica Releases “Must-Have” Guide For Any Educator Trying To Interpret Research

New Study Finds That PD, Collaboration, Safety, Expectations Important For Schools – What A Surprise!

The Elephant In The Room In The Talent vs. Practice Debate

Round Two: How Much “Content” Knowledge Do You Really Need To Be An Effective Teacher?

A Decent Post About The Value Of Guided/Assisted Discovery Learning – Too Bad It Uses The Wrong Comparison

May 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – So Far

Another day, another mid-year “Best” list (you can find all 1,700 Best lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2016 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2015 – So Far

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2014 – So Far

The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators

The Best Videos For Educators In 2013 – Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Videos For Educators In 2012 — Part One

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011

Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010

The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010

And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part OneThe Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language LearnerThe Best Video Clips Demonstrating “Grit”; and The Best Fun Videos About Books & Reading.

You might also want to check out The Best Video Collections For Educators ; The Best Video Clips On Goal-Setting — Help Me Find More ; The Best Movie Scenes, Stories, & Quotations About “Transfer Of Learning” – Help Me Find More! ;  The Best Funny Videos To Help Teach Grammar – Help Me Find More ; The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem” and The Best Videos For Teaching & Learning About Figurative Language.

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Showing Good & Bad Classroom Discussions

The Best TV/Movie Scenes Demonstrating A “Growth Mindset” – Help Me Find More

The Best Movie/TV Scenes Demonstrating Metacognition – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos About The Importance Of Practice – Help Me Find More

The Best Videos Explaining Gravitational Waves (In An Accessible Way)

The Best Random Acts Of Kindness Videos

The Best Videos For Learning About Civil Disobedience

The Best Videos For Learning About The Scientific Method

I’ve also written a guest post for Edutopia titled 5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Videos for ELL Classrooms. You might find it useful.

Here are my choices for The Best Videos For Educators In 2017 – So Far (some may have been produced prior to this year, but are just new to me):

I’ll start off with share a link to my previous post, Six New Videos Teaching Bloom’s Taxonomy In Creative Ways – the headline is self-explanatory!

I’m adding this new video to The Best Resources On Different Types Of Map Projections:

I’m adding this new video from The Economist to The Best Websites To Teach & Learn About African-American History:

I’m not really sure how many of our students know who Bruce Springsteen is, but this is an amazing video for any who do (though there is one minor classroom inappropriate word)…

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice.

I’m adding this new video to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Oceans:

We’re doing our IB Theory of Knowledge Oral Presentations, and this is a video of Michelle’s presentation. She’s given me permission to share it here. I’m giving her a 7 on the (in my opinion) somewhat weird IB Presentation Rubric.

What do you think? (by the way, you can find all our class materials on the Oral Presentation, including many other videos, here).

I have a lot of videos on the The Best Resources For Learning About Rube Goldberg Machines list, but this is the first one I’ve seen that has characters and a storyline:

I worked with Education Week to create an animated video on the topic of transfer of learning. I’ve written a lot about transfer, including devoting a chapter in one of my books to the topic (see an excerpt from that chapter published by The Washington Post, The real stuff of schooling: How to teach students to apply knowledge) and publishing a popular “Best” list – The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More.

In my book I give credit to the late Grant Wiggins for an example of how to promote transfer through generalizing.  He used the example of students learning about the qualities of a successful social movement from analyzing the women’s movement.  I also use that example in the video but, because of a miscommunication, credit to him , unfortunately, doesn’t appear.  You can see links to several articles by him on the topic at my “Best” list.

Here’s the video:

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources On How Exercise Helps Learning — Please Contribute Other Resources:

I’m adding this new video from Jo Boaler to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset”:

Educator, speaker, and writer Chris Emdin gave the keynote at SXSWedu, a big education and tech conference. You can read an extensive interview I did with Chris for Education Week last year, ‘For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…’: An Interview With Chris Emdin. You can also read about this impressive keynote at Ed Week, SXSWedu 2017 Conference Opens With a Challenge of Attendees’ Motives.

I’m adding this new lesson and video from TED-Ed to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice.

This new video is very engaging and enlightening. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

“How small are we in the scale of the universe?” is the title of a new TED-Ed video and lesson. I’m adding it to The Best Web Tools That Show You Objects To Scale.

Gail Desler – with the support of educators and students – has organized the fabulous Time Of Remembrance website documenting Japanese-American internment in World War Two, along with the Vietnam War.

Because of my work with Hmong refugees, I was honored to received an invitation to be interviewed as part of the project.

The full video is thirty-six minutes along. ELL teachers might find it useful, since I discuss a wide-ranging list of issues, including the importance of looking at our students through the eyes of assets and not deficits, inductive learning, concept attainment, parent engagement, professional development and many other items of possible interest.

If you go to the video at the Time of Remembrance website, it has an outline and summary of what’s covered in different sections of the video.

I’ve embedded the full video below. In addition, I’ve also embedded a short clip that Time Of Remembrance has created from the original full-length video:

Regular readers know I’m very interested in the concept of student motivation (and have even written three books on it – with a fourth on the way – see Best Posts On “Motivating” Students).

Dan Ariely is a Duke professor who has also studied the topic (you can see my past posts about his work here, including a video he did for my Ed Week column).

This evening, the PBS NewsHour did a great interview with him about employee motivation, but just substitute the word “student” for employee and it will be extremely relevant to teachers.

You can read the transcript here, and I’ve embedded the video below.

In it, he discusses the Ikea Effect (see Video: “How the ‘IKEA effect’ can motivate people to work [& learn] harder”) – basically, we are more invested in something if we feel we contributed to creating it.

I believe that idea can also be applied to constructivist pedagogy, which is why I’m a big believer in inductive teaching (see The Best Resources About Inductive Learning & Teaching, as well as this post.

In the PBS segment, he also discusses the demotivating aspects of seeing your work destroyed in front of you, which is why I am always very careful to wait to throw away student posters and other work until they are long gone for the day..

The New York Times has published a series of short and very accessible videos helping people understand implicit bias.

You see the entire series here, and I’ve embedded the first one below.

These are excellent for many classes, and I’ll certainly be using it in my IB Theory of Knowledge classes, especially when we study perception.

I’m adding this info to A Collection Of Advice On Talking To Students About Race, Police & Racism.

In this video, fourth-graders “describe bad stereotypes they’ve heard about people who look like them.”

You can read more about it in The Washington Post article, Ten-year-olds tackle ‘The Lie’ of demeaning stereotypes in video.

I’m adding it to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More.

The Lie from Untitled Productions on Vimeo.

This article – Can You Figure Out the Mystery Inside This Remarkable Ad About High School Love? – and video on Ad Week has been all over social media.

It sends an amazingly effective in sending a message on gun violence and schools.

I’ll be showing it Monday to my IB Theory of Knowledge class to initiate a discussion on that topic and on what we can learn from the video about Perception as a Way Of Knowing:

I’m adding this video to The Best Sites For International Day Of The World’s Indigenous People and to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About U.S. History:

English teacher and author extraordinaire Jim Burke shared this video on Twitter.

The clip shows (minus the peer insults) how close reading might work in a perfect world.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading” — Help Me Find More.

May 13, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far

As regular readers know, it’s time for me to begin posting my mid-year “The Best….” lists. There are over 1,700 regularly updated lists now.  You can see them all here.

As usual, in order to make this list, a site had to be:

* accessible to English Language Learners and non-tech savvy users.

* free-of-charge.

* appropriate for classroom use.

* completely browser-based with no download required (however, I’ve begun to make exceptions for special mobile apps).

It’s possible that a few of these sites began earlier than this year, but, if so, I’m including them in this list because they were “new to me” in 2017.

You might want to visit previous editions, as well as The “All-Time” Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education; The “All-Time” Best Ways To Create Online Content Easily & Quickly and The “All-Time” Best 2.0 Tools For Beginning English Language Learners.

The Fifty Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2015

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2014

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2013

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2012

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2011

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2010

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2009

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2008

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2007

I don’t rank my mid-year lists, but do place them in order of preference in my end-of-year lists. Just because a tool is on this mid-year list does not mean it will make the cut for the year-end version.

Feel free to let me know if you think I’m leaving any tools out.

Here are my twenty-five choices for The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017- So Far (not ranked in any order):

Publishthis.email lets you create a website via email.  You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s site.  I’m adding it to A Few Simple Ways To Introduce Reluctant Colleagues To Technology.

Quiznetic is a Kahoot-like tool that lets you create learning games in various racing forms. Students can then “race” each other in answering the questions and see their positions. It appears to be free, and seems simple to use.

Google unveiled AutoDraw, a free site that uses artificial intelligence that provides a series of guesses about what you are drawing. You can choose the right “guess” to pretty-up your artistic creation, write up some description, and then download it or share the link. The image above is an example. This is perfect for English Language Learners – instead of spending tons of time getting their drawing “just right,” they can, instead, have fun drawing quickly and spend more time on the language part of the exercise. And it’s great for ESL teachers, too – no more working hard trying to draw images of scenes for vocabulary items to support language acquisition. Now just draw a few lines, project it onto the screen, and you’ll be able to show a masterpiece. I’m adding this info to The Best Art Websites For Learning English.

Apple released a neat new free app called Clips. You can read a very good – and detailed – explanation of its features at TechCrunch. It’s billed as a video-editing tool, and it seems like an excellent and simple one. I’m always on the look-out for one of those since I have my IB Theory of Knowledge students periodically make videos, so Clips definitely gets added to the Not The “Best,” But A List… Of Online Video Editors list. But it’s much more than just a video-editor.  It has the “stop-action” ability of Instagram video (press to video, stop, press again), it provides flowing text you want to display by recognizing the words you say (a particularly useful tool for English Language Learners) and, even though it’s an Apple product, it’s easy to share videos to whatever platform you want to use. So, because of those features and others, I’m also adding it to The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram.

Erasures lets you create a version of “Blackout Poetry” online. You can learn more about Blackout Poetry here.

Loopy lets you create interactive simulations – just by drawing. This is how they describe themselves:

It’s the ancient, time-honored way of learning: messing around and seeing what happens. Play with simulations to ask “what if” questions, and get an intuition for how the system works!

Raw code is too inaccessible. Also drag-and-drop is too mainstream. But with LOOPY, you can model systems by simply drawing circles & arrows, like a wee baby

I don’t quite get it, but my post about it was quite popular, so apparently a lot of readers do….

StoryShares lets teachers create virtual classrooms for free and offers a collection of books that students can read. Even better, there’s an option that provides audio of the text in a pleasing-to-the-ear-voice. The best part of the site, though, is that students can also write and publish their own books to share. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress.

SlideBot lets you type the text you want to appear in each slide and then uses its software to design your slideshow in seconds. It’s pretty neat, and they’ve just unveiled a free education version. Unfortunately, if you want to be able to export it or use it in full-screen mode, it will cost $15. Those restrictions might make its use in education somewhat limited. However, I could also see some pretty major advantages, including eliminating the extensive time that some students spend on slide design. In addition, having students use SlideBot even a few times could be a good learning experience about good design of slides – its software appears pretty powerful based on my testing it out. I’m going to purchase the $15 dollar license for myself because it seems to create slideshows that are a hell of a lot better looking than the ones I create manually. In many ways, it’s a non-animated version of “My Simple Slideshow,” which automatically creates animations from text (see Wow – “My Simple Show” Is An Extraordinary Tool For Creating Free Video “Explainers”). I’m adding this info to The Best Ways To Create Online Slideshows.

Verse lets you create interactive videos. I’m adding it to A Potpourri Of The Best & Most Useful Video Sites.

Story Friend is a new iPhone app that may have potential.  It lets you create slideshows (like a zillion other apps).  However, this one lets you include content from other social media accounts, too – sort of a like a mobile Storify tool.

Dotstorming is an online collaborative tool that allows groups to work together and vote on preferences. It’s like a bunch of other similar tools, though this one stands out because it lets you easily search for and post images.  I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.

PortfolioGen lets students easily create online portfolios of their work.  I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Developing Student Portfolios.

Anchor is an easy tool for creating podcasts.  You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog.  I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.

QuizPedia lets you – or students – easily create…quizzes. You can learn more about it from Ed Tech For Beginners. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Create Online Tests.

Sketchboard is an online whiteboard where users can draw collaboratively. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.

Chart Accent lets you create charts and then annotate them. Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip.

Pinup is the latest addition to The Best Online Virtual “Corkboards” (or “Bulletin Boards”).

Qzzr looks like a fun place for students to create online quizzes.  I learned about it from Creative Language Class and am adding it to The Best Ways To Create Online Tests.

Stormboard, which is free for educators at least through July, 2017, is a nice new collaborative online “corkboard/bulletin board” where you can share “stickies,” including photos, videos and text. I’m adding it to the very popular The Best Online Virtual “Corkboards” (or “Bulletin Boards”).

I’ve written some past posts about the work of Philip Tetlock (Quote Of The Day: “beliefs are hypotheses to be tested…” and The Best Resources On The Importance Of Knowing What You Don’t Know).  He’s particularly known for his work in developing a science of “forecasting.” He recently unveiled a site called Good Judgment where users can forecast an answer to a question and, when and if the action takes place, is “scored” on their forecasting ability.  Users make a prediction, then share their reasoning, and you can link directly to individual’s forecasts. This seems to me to be an excellent way for students to write for an authentic audience, which is why I’m adding it to The Best Places Where Students Can Write For An “Authentic Audience”

Recap is a new tool designed to have students create short videos highlighting their reflections on the learning they’re doing in the classroom. I’m adding it to A Potpourri Of The Best & Most Useful Video Sites.

StepMap looks like a decent map-making site. I’m adding it to The Best Map-Making Sites On The Web.

Animaker looks like a pretty simple tool for creating online animations. It has lots of premium features, but you can make five for free. I’m adding it to The Best Ways For Students To Create Online Animations.

Telegra.ph lets your create a webpage without having to register.  You can read more about it at Richard Byrne’s blog.  It’s similar to a number of other sites, including Loose LeavesJust Paste It, and Instablogg.

Web Whiteboard is a nice online collaborative..whiteboard. You can read more details at Richard Byrne’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.

Google Sites opened its new version to the public for creating websites.You can read all about it at TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Ways For Students Or Teachers To Create A Website.

May 12, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Opposites

As I shared three months ago (see Beginning A New “Best” Series Of Interest To ELL Teachers), I’m beginning to create an updated series of “Best” lists for Beginning English Language Learners. They will ultimately replace the resources I have on my outdated website.

I began with:

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Jobs

The Best Resources For Helping ELLs Learn About Sports & Other Fun Activities

The Best Resources For Helping ELLs Learn About U.S. Money

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Space & Planets

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About “Feelings”

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Animals

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Health

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Community, Signs & Transportation

Here is what I have so far (This post is not completed yet, but I’m preparing it now because my students will be using it in the morning):

Learn Opposites

Match the Opposite Picture

What’s The Opposite

Many Things – Opposites

Adjectives Opposites

Opposites Game

Opposite Match

Opposites Duel

Matching Opposites

Listening and Opposites

May 8, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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All My Thematic “Best” Lists For Beginning ELLs – In One Place!

As regular readers know, I’ve been creating updated thematic lists for Beginning ELLs to take the place of my outdated website.

Here are links to all of them so far, and I’ll add new ones and I create them:

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Jobs

The Best Resources For Helping ELLs Learn About Sports & Other Fun Activities

The Best Resources For Helping ELLs Learn About U.S. Money

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Space & Planets

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About “Feelings”

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Animals

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Health

The Best Resources For Helping Beginner ELLs Learn About Community, Signs & Transportation

 

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