Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 5, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “Teaching Argument Writing to ELLs”

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

In 2014, Katie Hull-Sypnieski and I co-authored a piece in ASCD Educational Leadership titled Teaching Argument Writing to ELLs. It’s freely available so not behind a paywall.

I’ve written several articles for ASCD Educational Leadership over the years, and have one coming out in March on personalized learning.

Here are links to a few of my other past pieces for them:

December 4, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “The manipulation of Social Emotional Learning”

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

In 2014, The Washington Post published a piece I wrote headlined The Manipulation Of Social Emotional Learning.

I’ve since elaborated on the point at The Best Resources Showing Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough.

November 30, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: All My Posts For The British Council

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

In 2014, I began posting several times a year for Teaching English-British Council, probably the largest organization in the world promoting English-language teaching.

You can read all my British Council posts here.

Their are quite a few of them, and they’re all quite practical.

Here are direct links and titles to them:

Five Guidelines For Effective Classroom Management

Critical thinking

Strategies for self assessment

Online tools

Increasing Motivation Through Students Setting Goals

Metacognition, Learning Strategies And Student Autonomy

Why I became a teacher

Five strategies for ELL vocabulary instruction

Four strategies for grammar instruction

Instructional strategies for multi-level classes of English language learners

What Does Enhanced Discovery Learning Look Like In The ELL Classroom?

Relationships

Ideas for strengthening English skills over the summer

The picture word inductive model

Six ways teachers can stay energized

Creating The Conditions For Self-Motivated Students

Four questions to ask before using an Ed Tech tool

Assessing English language learners

Using a “Three-Two-one” Speaking Activity

 

 

November 28, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “How To Turn A Negative Consequence Into A Positive Classroom Management Strategy”

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

This post appeared in 2014:

Anyone who has regularly read this blog or my books know that I’m a big believer in “positive,” not “punitive,” classroom management strategies (see The Best Posts On Classroom Management).

At the same time, however, there are some occasions that negative consequences are called for — for “serious” offenses and for those times (and for those students) when all the positive classroom management tools in one’s toolbox aren’t working.

A key issue, though, is how — in those situations — can we maximize the chances of making a negative consequence part of a positive classroom management strategy….

I’ve written extensively about one way to do it — see a previous post (see Have You Ever Taught A Class That Got “Out Of Control”? and in my books where, in one, I devoted an entire chapter to that particular strategy).

Another way is doing what a number of teachers do — when an offense is committed, asking the student what consequence they think is appropriate.

Recently, though, I’ve tried a different version of that second strategy — instead of waiting for the offense to happy, engaging with students in advance about what negative consequence would get them to think twice about committing the offense.

Two of my students — good kids — have had a very difficult time controlling themselves. For months, I had tried every tool in my toolbox, but nothing seemed to work.

Then, in an individual and private conversation with each, I asked how much time out of our fifty-five minute class they felt they were focused on what we were studying. Each of them replied — quite accurately — about twenty minutes. We sort of repeated what we had gone over in previous meetings — talking about what they wanted to do in the future, how self-control and “grit” was important in making those future dreams happen, etc. I shared my frustration that we had tried many things in the past, including many of their suggestions — changing seats, stress balls, etc. — and nothing had seemed to work. I told them I wanted to continue to be flexible and positive, and it had also reached the point that I wanted to explore negative consequences.

I asked what would be a negative consequence that they thought would deter them from their typical misbehavior — what would they remember to keep in mind that would make them think twice about acting out in class? Both identified an immediate call to their parents, and we worked out how I would be able to get a hold of them. Then, I asked them what positive behavior interventions they thought had been more effective, and asked each to develop a sequence of escalating interventions. They each said they would like to try a permanent seat change (which we had tried before) to see if that would help, and they chose the seat. They said if they were acting out, they would want to be sent out of class for a few minutes, which I agreed to (though I told each that I would rather they took responsibility and went out on their own when they felt they were “losing it” instead of waiting for me to tell them).

If those didn’t work, they then said I should immediately call home and tell their parents how they were behaving.

Since that conversation, we’ve done the seat changes, and neither has chosen to go outside or had to be sent outside, and I’ve also not had to call home, either. It appears that it took them identifying a potential negative consequence in order for the positive strategies to work.

It’s not a strategy I would use all the time, but it’s just another tool in my teacher’s toolbox.

I guess in classroom management, a positive plus a potential negative can sometimes equal a positive….

I know teachers have used this kind of process in developing class rules and consequences, but the idea of trying it in advance individually was a new one for me…

November 25, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: 2013’s Best Posts From This Blog

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

Here is a a collection of my favorites from 2013:

A Look Back: “Does Class Size Matter?”

A Look Back: “Five key strategies to get/keep kids engaged at school”

A Look Back: “Using Freire & Fotobabble With English Language Learners”

A Look Back: “Why we can’t all get along over school reform”

A Look Back: “This Is Exactly What I Mean By Connecting Social Emotional Learning & Literacy Instruction….”

A Look Back: “Flowchart For When A Day Goes Bad In Classroom Management”

A Look Back: A Simple & Effective Classroom Lesson On Gratitude

A Look Back: “New Research Shows Why Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and Character Education Are Not Enough”

A Look Back: The Best Posts On Writing Instruction

A Look Back: Surprise, Surprise: Study Finds That Relationships Promote Perseverance & Cash Bonuses Do Not

A Look Back: “Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students”

A Look Back: Giving Teachers the Opportunity to Say “Yes” to Ed Tech

A Look Back: The Differences Between Parent “Involvement” & Parent “Engagement”

A Look Back: “Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom-Management Tips”

A Look Back: “Five ways to get kids to want to read and write”

A Look Back: Knowledge Isn’t Power — “Power is Power”

A Look Back: Classroom Management Strategy: “Sometimes The Only Thing Worse Than Losing A Fight Is Winning One”

A Look Back: “Teacher: How my 9th graders graded me”

November 23, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “Does Class Size Matter?”

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Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

In 2013, Dana Goldstein had me as a guest, along with Matthew Chingos from the Brookings Institution, on a Slate podcast of Schooled: Does Class Size Matter?

You might also be interested in The Best Resources For Learning About How Class Size Does Matter.

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November 22, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: “Five key strategies to get/keep kids engaged at school”

Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

In 2013, The Washington Post published an excerpt from my book, Classroom Management Q&As: Expert Strategies for Teaching.

They headlined the excerpt as Five key strategies to get/keep kids engaged at school.

Here’s an excerpt:

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You might also be interested in The Best Posts & Articles On Student Engagement.

November 20, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

A Look Back: Tweeted Excerpts From My Books On Student Motivation

Next February, this blog will be celebrating its ten-year anniversary! Leading up to it, I’m re-starting a series I tried to do in the past called “A Look Back.” Each week, I’ll be re-posting a few of my favorite posts from the past ten years.

You might also be interested in:

 A Look Back: Best Posts From 2007 To 2009 

 A Look Back: 2010’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2011’s Best Posts From This Blog

A Look Back: 2012’s Best Posts From This Blog

Each time one of my books is published, I send out a series of short excerpts via Twitter.

So, as part of this “A Look Back” series, I’ll be re-tweeting some of those best tweets from my three student motivation books over the next week.

You can also access all of those past tweets, as well as a ton of other free resources, from those books by clicking on their covers.

Also keep in my mind that it will no longer be a “student motivation trilogy” – a fourth book in the series will be coming out in 2019 (after my next book on teaching ELLs)

 

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Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Problems.
 

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