Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

May 28, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“What Are We Losing By Eliminating Arts From the Curriculum?” Is Topic Of My Latest BAM! Radio Program

art

What Are We Losing By Eliminating Arts From the Curriculum? is the topic of my latest BAM! Radio program.

Virginia McEnerney and David Booth are my guests as we have a ten minute conversation.

They have also contributed written comments for an upcoming post at my Ed Week Teacher column….

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May 27, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“A Teacher-Counselor Partnership Is ‘Essential’ For Student Success”

A Teacher-Counselor Partnership Is ‘Essential’ For Student Success is Part Two in my Ed Week Teacher series on teacher-counselor partnerships.

Today’s post includes responses from Julie Hartline, the 2009 National Counselor Of The Year; and educator/authors Trish Hatch, Dr. Sherrel Bergmann and Dr. Judith Brough. In addition, I’ve included comments from readers.

Here are some excerpts:

School-counselors-can-be

School-counselors-and

Too-many-counselors

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May 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Ways To Develop A Teacher – School Counselor Partnership”

Ways To Develop A Teacher – School Counselor Partnership is my latest post at Education Week Teacher.

Today’s post features suggestions from three exceptional educators on how to solidify the teacher/counselor partnership: Dean Vogel, counselor, teacher and President of the California Teachers Association (I am a proud member of CTA); Leticia Gallardo, who works at the school where I teach and who is the most amazing counselor I’ve ever seen; and Mindy Willard, the 2013 National Counselor Of The Year.

Here are some excerpts:

As-budget-shortfalls

In-many-schools-teachers

Professional-School

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May 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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How We Can Develop a Culture of Success in Schools Is Topic Of My New BAM! Radio Program

heather

What Can We Do to Develop a Culture of Success in Schools? is the title of my latest BAM! Radio program.

Heather Wolpert-Gawron, Chris Lehmann, and I have a ten minute conversation about the topic.

Look for their written contributions in a future post at my Ed Week blog.

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May 18, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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‘Help Students Be Organized By Being Organized Yourself’

‘Help Students Be Organized By Being Organized Yourself’ is Part Two in my Ed Week series on classroom organization.

This post highlights the thoughts of two teachers — Debbie Diller and Leslie Blauman — as well as comments from readers.

You might also be interested in Part One.

Here are excerpts from today’s post:

Instruction-and

Whatever-organizational

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May 12, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“School Leaders Must Focus On ‘Authentic Learning,’ Not ‘Test Prep’”

School Leaders Must Focus On ‘Authentic Learning,’ Not ‘Test Prep’ is my latest post at Education Week Teacher.

In Part One of this series, three educators — Anne Reeves, Justin Tarte, and PJ Caposey — shared their responses (I also contributed my own).  Today, Justin Baeder and Kelly Young (who I consider my mentor in education) contribute their answers.  I include comments from readers, too.

Here are some excerpts:

The-idea-that-every

Too-many-classrooms-have

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May 9, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Administrators Must Make ‘Alliances With Students, Teachers & Parents’

Administrators Must Make ‘Alliances With Students, Teachers & Parents’ is my latest post at Education Week Teacher.

It includes guest responses from three educators — Anne Reeves, Justin Tarte, and PJ Caposey — as well as my own thoughts…

Here are some excerpts:

Just-as-teachers-must

We-want-our-kids-doing

If-you-dont-fail-on-a

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May 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“What Are the Best Ways for Teachers to Work With School Counselors?” Is Topic Of My Latest BAM! Program

counselor

What Are the Best Ways for Teachers to Work With School Counselors? is the topic of my latest ten minute BAM! Radio program.

I talk with Mindy Willard, 2013 American School Counselor of the Year, and Leticia Gallardo, who is the best counselor I’ve ever seen.

They are both contributors to an upcoming Ed Week column I have on the subject.

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April 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My New BAM! Radio Show Is On “How Can We Help Students (And Ourselves) Stay Organized?”

ariel

My latest ten minuted BAM! Radio segment is on “How Can We Help Students (And Ourselves) Stay Organized?.”

Check out the conversation I had with educator/authors Julia Thompson and Ariel Sacks. They both also have made a written contribution to an upcoming Ed Week column on the topic.

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April 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Many Ways To Help Our Students Grieve” Is My New Ed Week Post — & Here’s A Bonus

Many Ways To Help Our Students Grieve is my latest Education Week Teacher post.

Several exceptional educators have contributed to today’s column, including Mary Tedrow, Stephen Lazar, Larry Swartz, Dr. Sherrel Bergmann and Dr. Judith Brough. In addition, I’ve included responses from readers.

I’m going to share some excerpts, and then scroll down for a special bonus for readers of this blog:

Avoiding-the-difficult

Most-important-were-the

Childrens-literature

Perhaps-the-best-way-to

BONUS

Stephen Lazar, one of the contributors to today’s Ed Week post, writes regularly for that blog.

He provided a response to a question I covered in December:

What are strategies to close the gap between new ideas and implementation?

However, I filed it under the wrong question, and didn’t include it in that two-part post.

So, here’s Stephen’s response to that question:

Stephen Lazar, a National Board Certified Social Studies teacher, is a co-founder of Harvest Collegiate High School  in New York City where he teaches students Social Studies and English, is Assessment Coordinator, and union chapter leader.  Lazar works with Social Studies teachers across NYC and the nation to support to support inquiry-based instruction, project-based learning, and Common Core implementation.  He is profiled in Teacherpreneurs: Innovative Teachers Who Lead But Don’t Leave, by Barnett Berry, Ann Byrd, and Alan Wieder:

When it comes to implementing new and innovative ideas, the most important lesson I’ve learned is that most things do not go well the first time. They’re often not much better the second time. As a high school teacher, I’m lucky to teach the same class multiple times a day, so I can often get a new lesson right by the end of the day. Many teachers don’t have this luxury. The most significant thing leaders can do to support teachers trying new things is to manage expectations.

An even scarier proposition is when something goes well the first time, but not the second time. One of my best units ever was a loosely-veiled simulation of the Constitutional Convention I used to start my US History course. The first time I did it, things were magical. My students were into it, had deep conversations, and wrote thoughtful Constitutions. The second year it was a complete dud. In hindsight, the first year went so well because I had taught those same students the previous year, so I had already built up the trust necessary for them to go through a multi-week simulation that didn’t immediately appear to be connected to history. When I attempted the simulation a third time, I moved it back to the second week of school and got much better buy-in from my students. Therefore, the second most important thing we can do to support teachers is to help consider all possible reasons for the success and failure of an idea, and hold our conclusions to be quite tentative until they are repeated.

Both these suggestions assume we already have the ideas ready to implement, but it’s important to consider how we generate ideas. I’ve always found that new ideas I implement come through one of two avenues: either I watch somebody else do something and then borrow and adapt it, or I have the opportunity to plan with small groups of like-minded teachers who mutually push each others’ thinking. To make the first situation happen more often, leaders can come into teachers’ classrooms (with their permission, of course) and model new ideas for the first time, team teach them the second time, and then observe when the teacher tries it out for her or himself the third time. For the latter situation to occur, leaders need to prioritize scheduling in a way to give teachers the time necessary to collaborate. At the school I’ve helped create, Harvest Collegiate High School, departments have a daily planning period in common to allow for this collaboration.

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April 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Ask A Question, Any Question…

'question marks' photo (c) 2007, gillian maniscalco - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

My Classroom Q & A column over at Education Week Teacher continues to grow in popularity as it nears the end of its third year.

I’ve already begun collecting new questions for the next school year, so feel free to contribute on — either by leaving it in the comments section or by sending it to me using this contact form. As you probably know, a wide-ranging group of educators provide guest responses in the column to questions,

Let me know if I can use your name or if you prefer to be anonymous.

And if I select your question, you get to choose a free book from a variety of publishers!

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April 23, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My New Radio Program: “How Can Administrators Help Support an Engaging Curriculum in the Classroom?”

young

My new BAM! Radio program is on How Can Administrators Help Support an Engaging Curriculum in the Classroom?

Kelly Young (who I consider to be my primary mentor) and Anne Reeves are my guests in this nine-minute podcast.

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