Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Can I Still Rely on the National Reading Panel Report? is an excellent post from literacy expert Timothy Shanahan. I certainly still rely on it, and it was great to read that follow-up studies have found that its recommendations work for English Language Learners, too. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Reading Strategies & Comprehension – Help Me Find More!

Quick, Draw!: an adaptation for world language classes is a nice post about using Quick Draw With Google as a language-learning tool. Thanks to CASLS for the tip.

Back-to-School Reading for English-Language-Learner Teachers is from Ed Week.

CREATING A CLASSROOM CULTURE OF CONVERSATION: THE FIRST TWO WEEKS is from Karen Lewis.

Tan Huynh shares useful materials here:

Here are some good videos to show to ELLs and then have them talk and write about what they saw:

I’m adding that last one to The Best Video Clips Of Sneaky Critters — Help Me Find More.

August 10, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Advocating For ELLs is a relatively new Facebook Group you might be interested in exploring and/or joining (I’m a member!). Here’s how Valentina Gonzalez describes it:

This group serves as a resource for educators who work with English Language Learners. It is a place for the members to collaborate and share information.

The Case for Comprehensible Input is by Stephen Krashen and appeared in Language Magazine.

Kieran Donaghy has a nice lesson plan for ELLs using the viral short “In A Heartbeat.”

Scaffolding the Reading of Seventh-Grade English Learners: How Much is too Much? is another important post from Timothy Shanahan. It has a lot of useful information, though I think it minimizes how difficult it is to help move adolescent ELLs with minimal reading skills to grade-level.

Academic Vocabulary Instruction II: Learning 1 Word in 5 Hours Shouldn’t Count as a Success is from The Backseat Linguist. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Is a New English-Proficiency Test Too Hard? Educators and Experts Debate. is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

This is a useful video from Karen Lewis:

This next tweet is helpful if you have read Carol Salva’s great book, Boosting Achievement:

August 5, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

First, a quick update: Katie Hull and I have now completed over 90,000 words of our next book on teaching ELLs, and it’s looking good! Only 20,000 words to go. We’re near a final decision on the book’s title, and it will be out by next March.

The latest issue of my favorite – and free – English-teaching journal, Humanising Language Teaching, is online and available.

Tan Huynh provides a good overview of Instructional Program Models for Teaching English.

The Backseat Linguist has speaks some truth about a new study: Academic Vocabulary Instruction: Does Word Generation Really Teach You Two Years’ Worth of Words in 22 Weeks? I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Rising popularity of dual-language education could leave Latinos behind is from The Hechinger Report.

The great Fluency MC has a new video on the past tense:

Here’s a video from The Teaching Channel of a 12th grade teacher preparing what looks to be advanced ELLs for literature circles:

Here’s yet another new Simon’s Cat video that’s great to have ELLs watch and then describe verbally and in writing what they saw (you might also be interested in The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2017 – So Far):

And here’s another video that could be used with ELLs the same way:

Lastly, here are some good sentence stems:

July 29, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Gianfranco Conti, one of the sharpest minds around in the language teaching world (I’ve previously shared many of his posts) has just begun a Facebook group called Global Innovative Language Teachers that includes teachers of all languages, including ELL/ESL/ELT educators. He was kind enough to write this description:

Global Innovative Language Teachers is a support group whose mission is to bring together language teachers from all over the world in the hope to go beyong insular views of language teaching pedagogy created by national curricula, imposed methods and theories and individual school policies and micro-cultures. Modern language, EAL, ELT and classical language teachers are all equally welcome. It is a place where we hope you will share your knowledge and opinions, celebrate your successes, vent your daily frustrations and seek advice from the many innovative and experienced language educators that have joined our ranks. G.I.L.T. is a safe space where criticism of others’ views and products is not merely tolerated but actually encouraged, although members are urged to stay constructive and conduct themselves in a professional and ethical manner. You or your posts shall not be removed unless they are totally irrelevant or offensive. Even so, you will receive several gentle reminders of the group’s guidelines before any action is taken and whilst you may be banned from posting (temporarily or indefinitely) you will still be welcome to stay. Do not be intimidated by some of the ‘big names’ on this forum or by the several decades of teaching experience of some of our jurassic veterans (e.g. Steve Smith). Share what you know or think it works, from the most elaborate theoretical SLA construct to the little daily classroom trick that can change the day. Welcome to our group.

Speaking of Gianfranco, check out his post, Eight narrow reading techniques that will enhance your students’ vocabulary and reading skills.

Tune Into English has a lot of resources about teaching English through music. I’m adding it to The Best Music Websites For Learning English.

Virginia high school gets a boost for some of its neediest immigrant students is from The Washington Post.

Closing the Books on Open Court Reading is from The Backseat Linguist.   I’m adding it to The Best Articles & Sites For Teachers & Students To Learn About Phonics.

Another Round of Summer Reading for English-Language-Learner Educators is from Learning The Language at Ed Week.

TechCrunch had a story about Duolingo raising a ton of money (see my past posts on Duolingo, which is one of the best online tools, if not the best, for language-learning). This part of the article caught my eye:

Gotthilf specifically noted plans for launching new products that target intermediary users. The first of this is currently called Duolingo Stories and is meant to provide these more advanced users with more of a challenge than the current Duolingo experience, which is geared more toward beginners. As the name implies, Stories will focus on longer narratives, though the exact details of the product remain under wraps.

That sounds interesting!

I’ve written about using photo collages in lessons, and you can find those resources at The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.  Here’s a new collage from The New York Times – it’s on goats!

Ana Cristina wrote a post about an intriguing site called Word Booster. Paste in the url address of any online article and it will immediately provide you with several free PDFs of the article that has been displayed in a reader-friendly way, a word list, and a vocabulary test. I’m generally skeptical of sites that automatically create learner materials. I’ve got to say, though, that my experiments with Word Booster have resulted in some decent sheets. I still wouldn’t generally use them in my lessons. However, I think I will try it out next year by having students pick any article of their choice online and create their own sheets to complete. It might be interesting to see how it goes. I’m adding this info to The Best Sites Where ELL’s Can Learn Vocabulary.

Very Early Exposure to English Can Help ELLs Flourish, Study Finds is from Ed Week.

I’ve previously sung the praises of CommonLit (see “CommonLit” Now Lets Teachers Create Free Virtual Classrooms). They’ve now made their site even more accessible to English Language Learners. Read about it at their article that has a somewhat over-reaching headline: Transformative Tools for ELLs and Struggling Readers

Unlocking The Potential of ELLs is a blog post by Valentina Gonzalez.

This Arkansas Radio Station Became a Hub for People From the Marshall Islands is from NBC News. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The Marshall Islands.

Literacy Centers for Multilingual Students is a new video from The Teaching Channel:

July 19, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Phonics for English Learners? What Do You Think? is a post by literacy expert Timothy Shanahan, and is the best piece I’ve ever read on phonics and ELLs. Unfortunately, he doesn’t actually recommend how best to teach phonics, but I guess you can’t have everything. I’m adding it to The Best Articles & Sites For Teachers & Students To Learn About Phonics.

Summer Reading for English-Language-Learner Educators is from Education Week.

Thousands of English-Learners Fall Short on Test of Language Skills is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Ins & Outs Of Reclassifying ELLs.

13 commonly made mistakes in Modern Language Instruction is by Gianfranco Conti.

The Schools Transforming Immigrant Education is from The Atlantic.

I talk about how I use photo collages for a language acquisition activity both in this NY Times post and in The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.  The NY Times has published another nice collage that would be useful.

How exposure to a foreign language ignites infants’ learning is from Science Daily.

Next Generation Learning Models for ELL Students is from Getting Smart.

RTI and English Learners: 4 Considerations is by Jana Echevarria. I’d like to particularly recommend her seven questions “to distinguish between disability and language difference.” I’ m adding it to The Best Resources On Assisting ELLs With Special Needs – Help Me Find More.

I’m adding this tweet to The Best Sites To Teach About African-American History:

July 13, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

I’ve previously posted an excerpt from Carol Salva’s great new book (see New Book Excerpt: Supporting ELL Students With Interrupted Formal Education) and now you can participate in an online book discussion about it. Learn about the easy process at Book Study on Boosting Achievement.

What Modern Language teachers like and dislike about professional development events is from Gianfranco Conti. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers — Help Me Find More.

This website has an incredible collection of short narrated slideshows where immigrants share their stories. You can also view and/or download transcripts. They would be great models for students to use to create their own. Thanks to Damaris Gutierrez for sharing it on Twitter.

Beyond the Gap Fill: Dynamic Activities for Song in the EFL Classroom is from American English. I’m adding it to The Best Music Websites For Learning English.

Contours of the Field: Engaging Parents of English Learners is from New America.

Here’s a nice example of phonics instruction for high school ELLs. You can download materials here. I’m adding it to The Best Articles & Sites For Teachers & Students To Learn About Phonics:

July 6, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

English learners often go without required help at Chicago schools is from The Chicago Reporter.

7 Must-Listen Podcasts for English Language Teachers is from Teach English Spain. I had never heard of any of these shows, but I’m going to check them out.

M is for Machine translation is by Scott Thornbury. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Google Translate & Other Forms Of Machine Translation.

English learner reclassification is a hot topic right now in the California State Legislature. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Ins & Outs Of Reclassifying ELLs.

Southeast is Fastest Growing Region for English Learners is from New America.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services recently expanded its materials to help study for the Citizenship test. They have an iPhone app, an online practice test, and more Study Materials for the English Test. I’m adding them to The Best Websites For Learning About Civic Participation & Citizenship.

‘I’m a Real American Now’: New Citizens Take the Oath, Trump in Mind is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to the same list.

Immigrant kids can’t be detained without their day in court, 9th Circuit rules is from The Sacramento Bee. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On The Trump Administrations New Immigration Enforcement Policies.

Trump Administration Targets Parents in New Immigration Crackdown is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to the same list.

In my last Around The Web In ESL, I shared one of my older NY Times posts where I explained how I used photo collages in teaching English. I also shared tools where you can make your own collages.  I’ve just discovered a new place to find already-created photo collages – The NY Times has a feature called “Flashback” that shares photos from their archives.  If you click on the “grid” icon on the top right, you’ll get a great collage to use in class.  I’ll add this info to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.

I Am Learning Inglés: A Dual-Language Comic is a comic from NPR. They’ve also converted it into this video:

Caterpillar App looks like an intriguing tool for language-learning. Here’s a video about it (thanks to Shelly Sanchez Terrell for the tip):

July 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Bracing for a Showdown Over Immigration Rights, DACA is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Practical Resources For Helping Teachers, Students & Families Respond To Immigration Challenges.

Carol Salva writes about the many ways teachers can use the Kahoot game with ELLs.

Are You Practicing Culturally Responsive Teaching? is from Valentina Gonzalez. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!

What’s new in ELT besides technology? is from Cambridge Press.

ESL Jigsaws by Nancy Callan has some great ideas about how to use the jigsaw strategy with ELLs, along with offering excellent materials.  I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

I also happened to learn about a good reading site for Intermediate ELLs called Talk Path Therapy.  Nancy writes about it here.

Here are several new additions to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons:

You can find a bunch of “spot the difference” pictures here. I’ve found these useful as part of a classroom vocabulary game. You can find even more here.

I’ve sometimes shown photos to students, hid the captions, and challenged them to write their own. It’s easy hide the captions at The Atlantic Focus photo blog ; the Boston Globe’s Big Picture and The Sacramento Bee’s photo galleries. These three sites show large images with captions at the bottom of the photos that are easy to cover-up. In addition, Getty Images has the ability to click on an icon and have the captions disappear.

Speaking of captions, The British Council has a special site where ELLs can write captions for photos.

Finally, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, ELT Pics is a wonderful site for ELL teachers who want to use photos.

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