Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – Part Two

 

Time for another end-of-the-year ”The Best…” list.  I’m adding this post to All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site.

* be seen by me during the last six months of 2017. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017- Part Two:

Google Publishes Series Of Video Instructions About Creating Online “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

Bamboozle lets you create games your class can play by projecting them on a screen.  They seem easy to create, though I it doesn’t yet have that large of a collection of ones that other teachers have created.  You might also be interested in The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

Payback is a new free “choose your own adventure” quasi-game that’s designed to help students anticipate college costs. I heard about it through a recent New York Times article headlined A Game to Help Students Pay the Right Price for College. It’s definitely accessible, even though it’s a bit simplistic. I could see using it to initiate a conversation with students about college issues.I’m adding this info to: The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career.

Here are several new Geography games I’m adding to The Best Online Geography Games (thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tips).

They stand out from the ones presently on the list, which are all good – but very, very similar:

My Name Is Hunt uses maps, but is also a text-based “choose your own adventure” style of game (see more of them at The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories). It’s only accessible to advanced English Language Learners, but definitely is unusual.

urbanopticon is a game that incorporates the idea of “citizen science.” Here is how they explain it:

This game will show you randomly selected urban scenes and ask you where they are. In so doing, we capture your mental map – that is, which parts of the city you tend to correctly recognize. By combining your answers with other people’s, we are able to draw the collective mental map of the city. The collective map is important because it is associated with happiness. In his “The image of the city”, Kevin Lynch showed that the happiest areas are those that are easily recognized and, as such, are prominent in people’s minds. By knowing which areas are difficult to recognize, we are able to recommend urban interventions to different stakeholders, including local government, urban planners and artists.

Where In the World Looks like a very good game for students. Here is its description:

Play the game to explore country landmarks all over the world, from royal palaces to historical attractions. See if you can figure out where in the world you are!

TIME has created a neat new game called “Can You Draw The States?” You’re prompted to draw a state. Once you’re done, you’re graded on how well you did and it’s put on a blank U.S. map so you can ultimately see your complete work. In some ways, it’s similar to an older game called Scribble States.

Factitious is an engaging online game to teach about fake news. It could be a fun activity to do to finish-up a more extensive lesson on the topic. You can learn more about it at NPR’s article, To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game. You can also find lots of resources on teaching about fake news at The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy, including the lesson plan I did for The NY Times.

Carol Salva writes about the many ways teachers can use the Kahoot game with ELLs.

Quiz Game Master lets you easily many different types of learning games for students to play. You can see a list of all the different types on the image at the top of this post. Unfortunately, the site doesn’t automatically host the games – you either have to pay $5 annually for that feature or download the games you create as a zip file.

With both Jo Boaler and Dan Meyer endorsing Super Math World, I can only assume it’s a great math learning game.

I’m not a big fan of Word Searches, but they can sometimes be a fun activity for students to create. Word Search Labs is an easy tool for creating word searches online. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Making Crossword Puzzles & Hangman Games.

October 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Travel Map lets you create a “travel blog” documenting a trip on an interactive map. Sites like this one can be used by students to document a field trip, a journey from literature or history, or a military campaign. However, Travel Map is not as intuitive as I would like it to be, so I’m not sure it’s they best tool of its type, but it’s worth checking out. You can see other options at The Best Map-Making Sites On The Web.

Pictogon lets you create interactive images (dots you can click on to get more information on items or people in the picture). It’s nice, but you can only make a few before they start charging.  Check out The Best Online Tools For Using Photos In Lessons  to find other free or lower-cost alternatives.

Get Acquainted is a very intriguing online survey tool that creates “conversational polls.” I’d encourage you to read Richard Byrne’s post and watch his video about it. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Creating Online Polls & Surveys.

Bamboozle lets you create games your class can play by projecting them on a screen.  They seem easy to create, though I it doesn’t yet have that large of a collection of ones that other teachers have created.  You might also be interested in The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

GIF Maker, Video to GIF lets you easily…create GIF’s from videos.  I’m adding it to The Best Resources On GIFs — Please Contribute More, which I need to update.

September 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Payback” Is A “Choose Your Own Adventure” Tool To Help Students Envision College Costs

 

Payback is a new free “choose your own adventure” quasi-game that’s designed to help students anticipate college costs.

I heard about it through a recent New York Times article headlined A Game to Help Students Pay the Right Price for College.

It’s definitely accessible, even though it’s a bit simplistic. I could see using it to initiate a conversation with students about college issues.

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career

The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

September 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Three New & Unique Geography Games

Here are several new Geography games I’m adding to The Best Online Geography Games (thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tips).

They stand out from the ones presently on the list, which are all good – but very, very similar:

My Name Is Hunt uses maps, but is also a text-based “choose your own adventure” style of game (see more of them at The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories). It’s only accessible to advanced English Language Learners, but definitely is unusual.

urbanopticon is a game that incorporates the idea of “citizen science.” Here is how they explain it:

This game will show you randomly selected urban scenes and ask you where they are. In so doing, we capture your mental map – that is, which parts of the city you tend to correctly recognize. By combining your answers with other people’s, we are able to draw the collective mental map of the city. The collective map is important because it is associated with happiness. In his “The image of the city”, Kevin Lynch showed that the happiest areas are those that are easily recognized and, as such, are prominent in people’s minds. By knowing which areas are difficult to recognize, we are able to recommend urban interventions to different stakeholders, including local government, urban planners and artists.

Where In the World Looks like a very good game for students. Here is its description:

Play the game to explore country landmarks all over the world, from royal palaces to historical attractions. See if you can figure out where in the world you are!

July 6, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Geography Game: “Can You Draw The States?”

TIME has created a neat new game called “Can You Draw The States?”

You’re prompted to draw a state. Once you’re done, you’re graded on how well you did and it’s put on a blank U.S. map so you can ultimately see your complete work.

In some ways, it’s similar to an older game called Scribble States.

I’m adding it to The Best Online Geography Games.

Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip.

July 3, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Factitious” Is An Online Game To Teach About Fake News

Factitious is an engaging online game to teach about fake news. It could be a fun activity to do to finish-up a more extensive lesson on the topic.

You can learn more about it at NPR’s article, To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game.

You can also find lots of resources on teaching about fake news at The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy, including the lesson plan I did for The NY Times.

July 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Bamboozle lets you easily create and play learning games. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

You can easily create simple email newsletters with elink.  I’m adding it to The Best Applications For Creating Free Email Newsletters.

Google Photos adds smarter sharing, suggestions and shared libraries is from TechCrunch.

Hypersay is another tool to encourage audience feedback during presentations.

SankeyMATIC lets you easily build a Sankey diagram builder. No, I don’t really understand what it is, either, but it’s apparently a popular and respected kind of infographic. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

The Ultimate Screencasting Guide For Teachers And Students is by Heather Wolpert-Gawron.

July 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Bracing for a Showdown Over Immigration Rights, DACA is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Practical Resources For Helping Teachers, Students & Families Respond To Immigration Challenges.

Carol Salva writes about the many ways teachers can use the Kahoot game with ELLs.

Are You Practicing Culturally Responsive Teaching? is from Valentina Gonzalez. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!

What’s new in ELT besides technology? is from Cambridge Press.

ESL Jigsaws by Nancy Callan has some great ideas about how to use the jigsaw strategy with ELLs, along with offering excellent materials.  I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

I also happened to learn about a good reading site for Intermediate ELLs called Talk Path Therapy.  Nancy writes about it here.

Here are several new additions to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons:

You can find a bunch of “spot the difference” pictures here. I’ve found these useful as part of a classroom vocabulary game. You can find even more here.

I’ve sometimes shown photos to students, hid the captions, and challenged them to write their own. It’s easy hide the captions at The Atlantic Focus photo blog ; the Boston Globe’s Big Picture and The Sacramento Bee’s photo galleries. These three sites show large images with captions at the bottom of the photos that are easy to cover-up. In addition, Getty Images has the ability to click on an icon and have the captions disappear.

Speaking of captions, The British Council has a special site where ELLs can write captions for photos.

Finally, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, ELT Pics is a wonderful site for ELL teachers who want to use photos.

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