Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“SuperTeacherTools” Is An Excellent Site For ELL Beginners To Create & Play Games

I’ve been doing a series of posts this week about tools my English Language Beginners have been using to create online content. This process has included many barriers, including older tech, District content filters, ease-of-use, and ensuring that tech brings an added value to what we’re doing.

But it has gone well. The past posts have been:

“Little Bird Tales” Is An Excellent Web 2.0 Tool For Beginning English Language Learners

Video: “Adobe Spark” Is Excellent Tool For ELLs

“Write About” Is Another Great Tool For ELLs

SuperTeacherTools is the latest tool that my students have used.  It’s been on The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games for awhile.

Students (and teachers) can create three types of games (images of two of them are at the top of this post) without having to register with the site.  It’s simple and very user-friendly.  My students create the games, post the links on our class blog, and then classmates play them.

I especially like the one that has a “drag-and-drop” interface.

Go to our class blog to try them out.  I’d love to find a tool that lets students create audio quizzes.  I’ll be exploring The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games more deeply to see if I’ve missed that feature in any of those sites.

I’m adding this post to The “All-Time” Best 2.0 Tools For Beginning English Language Learners.

December 30, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two

Here are this week’s choices:

Duolingo, everybody’s favorite language-learning tool, unveiled a new feature – the ability for users to create “clubs” so that they can exchange messages and share a “leaderboard” with their friends.  It sounds like it’s having some initial “hiccups,” but I could eventually see it as a useful tool for peer encouragement.

Students, some of them immigrants, write children’s books inspired by their own life’s journeys is from The Washington Post.

Five tips for using authentic video in the classroom is from The British Council and is pretty interesting. I’m adding it to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL.

This is from 2015, but still interesting: Nine interesting foreign language research findings you may not know about from Language Gym.

ELT Sparks has a nice lesson idea in Most Influential Images. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.

I’ve written several posts about TimeSlips, a program designed to assist dementia patients whose strategy I think is also useful for language-learning.  Here’s a new Voice of America video report on what they do:

I’ve previously written about Kahoot, and it’s on a couple of “Best” lists.  Here are a couple of tweets about a new feature that it has added:

This would be depressing if it happened:

November 24, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

the-best-online-learningfff

Time for another end-of-year ”The Best…” list.

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site, though there is one on this list that doesn’t quite meet this particular criteria.

* be seen by me during the last six months of 2016. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016- Part Two:

The Fiscal Ship was just named of one the top games at the Serious Play Conference. It’s a surprisingly accessible and engaging interactive about (yawn) fiscal policy and the federal budget. Though the majority of its backers appear to be conservative groups, the sponsoring group includes a few others, too. I didn’t play the game all the way through; however, what I did get through seemed to be relatively even-handed without pushing a particular agenda.

Pairprep is a free site that has a number of “courses” (a series of multiple choice questions on a particular topic – like “ESL”) where students can compete against a friend, a random opponent, or themselves as they choose answers. Teachers can monitor student progress through a virtual classroom.

National Geographic has created a page with links to their most engaging and educational games.

Guess What! is the name of a “new” game from Cambridge University Press. I have “new” in parenthesis because it’s a version of a game used with English Language Learners for decades – Taboo – where players have to describe a word without using the word, and others have to guess what is being described. The great twist in “Guess What!” is that students can create videos of them describing a word, upload it, and then have other classes use them as part of their own game (they provide simple instructions).

Pioneers of Flight has several interactive games, and comes from the Smithsonian.

Mission U.S. has created some excellent interactives and some bad ones.  Their newest one is on the Depression.  I haven’t played it, but they seemed to learn some lessons in on how their created their last one on immigration, so I’m going to give them the benefit of the doubt.

GlassLab Games lets educators create virtual classrooms where students can play educational games and have their progress monitored. You can create a free classroom, but only have access to one-or-two of the games, and you can also create a free one with access to all of them for sixty days. For a longer period of time, you need to pay, but the price is not astronomical. I’m not that impressed with the games they have now. However, the well-known game Civilization is creating a specific education version that was supposed to be available on the site in October.

Thanks to Sara-E. Cottrell, I recently learned about Sugarcane, a free web tool that lets you easily create lots of different kinds of learning games, as well as access ones that others have created. It’s owned by IXL Learning, but your school doesn’t have to be subscribed to it in order to use Sugarcane.

Reader Gabrielle Klingelhöfer shared the site Learning Apps with me, and I’m sure glad she did! It’s a free site that lets teachers create virtual classrooms where students can uses lots of different kinds of online exercises and games to learn many subjects. There are tons of already-created exercises divided by subject, and it seems super-easy – and I really mean easy – for teachers to create their own.

A bunch of groups, including museums and the city of London, have cooperated to create The Great Fire of London interactive, which includes what they call a “children’s game,” a Minecraft resource, and a lot of other features.

Brainpop has pulled together a nice collection of online games.

Smithsonian Science has put all their games in one place.

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November 6, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Sugarcane” Lets You Create Lots Of Different Learning Games

sugercane

Thanks to Sara-E. Cottrell, I recently learned about Sugarcane, a free web tool that lets you easily create lots of different kinds of learning games, as well as access ones that others have created.

It’s owned by IXL Learning, but your school doesn’t have to be subscribed to it in order to use Sugarcane.

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

November 3, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

NY Times Creates “Choose Your Own Adventure” Game – On Voter Suppression

votersuppression

The New York Times has created a great learning “game” to help people understand the difficulties many face when they want to vote in the United States.

Check out “The Voter Suppression Trail,” done in the style of the classic Oregon Trail game.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories (where you can also play the original “Oregan Trail”)

The Best Sites To Learn About The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections

October 29, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Learning Apps” Is One Of The Top Educational Websites Of The Year!

learningapps

Reader Gabrielle Klingelhöfer shared the site Learning Apps with me, and I’m sure glad she did!

It’s a free site that lets teachers create virtual classrooms where students can uses lots of different kinds of online exercises and games to learn many subjects. There are tons of already-created exercises divided by subject, and it seems super-easy – and I really mean easy – for teachers to create their own.

There are many ESL and regular English interactives. There are tons on other subjects, as well. My only suggestion to the site is that it would be nice to have a further search parameter to divide by language. The other subjects have many exercises in other languages (the site itself appears to be from Germany) and it would just make it a little easier for teachers. But it’s really a minor issue for a fabulous site.

I’m adding it to:

The Best Sites That Students Can Use Independently And Let Teachers Check On Progress

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

September 3, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Online “Game” About The Great London Fire

firefire

I don’t think it gets a whole of attention in U.S. school history books, but the Great Fire of London was a pretty big deal.

A bunch of groups, including museums and the city of London, have cooperated to create The Great Fire of London interactive, which includes what they call a “children’s game,” a Minecraft resource, and a lot of other features.

The game part includes simple text with audio support, so it’s particularly accessible to English Language Learners.

August 7, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Pioneers Of Flight” Is A Nice Collection Of Smithsonian Interactives

pioneersofflight

Pioneers of Flight has several interactives, and comes from the Smithsonian.

The image at the top of this post provides more details on the activities.

I’m adding them to The Best Resources For Learning About Flight, and I took the opportunity to completely revise and update that list.

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