Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

April 18, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Fifty Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

I’ve previously posted Apple’s New Video-Editing App “Clips” Is Much More…..  For even more related ideas, check out 5 Ways To Use Apple Clips In The Classroom And A Review from ICT Evangelist.

Here are two sites that let you create more arcade-like games: FlowLab, which only lets you create a few games for free, and GameFroot, which seems much more accessible and, as far as I can see, lets you do a lot of creation for free (let me know if I’m wrong on that score, though).

Here’s a video about GameFroot:

I’m not adding either one to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games – they’re just a little too complicated for my taste.

15 Second Book Talks Take 1 is from Colby Sharp. It’s about using Instagram’s new Stories tool for creating book talks. I’ve written a lot about how I use Instagram’s video feature for book talks and other projects (see The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram). I hadn’t paid much attention to the Stories feature because I knew it would automatically delete after twenty-four hours. But, after further investigation, I learned that it’s easy to save the videos as permanent.

April 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Quiznetic” Lets Teachers Create – & Students Play – Online Racing Games For Learning

Quiznetic is a Kahoot-like tool that lets you create learning games in various racing forms. Students can then “race” each other in answering the questions and see their positions.

It appears to be free, and seems simple to use.

However, they seem to be having some technical issues today so it wouldn’t let me confirm my email address (which is required in order to create a game). (I have since received a message from them saying they fixed that problem)

So I’m not ready to add it to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

Try it out and let me know what you think…

April 8, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Legends Of Learning” Is New Game-Based Site That Lets Teachers Create Free (For Awhile) Virtual Classrooms



Note: After a closer look, it appears the site is free for a month or so after registration (longer if you have fewer students) and then you have to review games, perform other services for the site, or pay per student. 

Legends of Learning is a new site that provides custom-built games organized by learning objectives. Teachers can create “playlists” they want their students to access and then monitor their progress.

They only have science-related games right now, but plan on adding more related to other subjects soon.

You can read more about it at USA Today’s article, ‘Spotify for learning games’ coming to classrooms, and I’ve embedded a video about the site at the bottom of this post.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress.

April 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Fifty Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2016). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

I previously posted  “Loopy” Lets You Create Interactive Simulations That Look Cool But I Don’t Really Understand Them. You can find even more similar tools at Explorable Explanations. I’m adding both to The Best Online Learning Simulation Games & Interactives — Help Me Find More, which I just completely updated and revised.

Feedly’s reader app now caters to knowledge workers with launch of boards, notes & annotations is from TechCrunch.

Kupiter lets you easily create Asteroids-like games – without having to register. All you have to do is create some questions. Unfortunately, the answers have to spelled out – so it takes awhile to play. I’m going to try having my English Language Learners use it to develop games for their classmates and see how it goes. It’s a nice tool, but, at this point, not good enough to be added to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games. I learned about Kupiter from Richard Byrne.

Here’s a video about it:

Speaking of Richard Byrne, his post How to Add Spoken Audio to Google Slides could come in very useful.

March 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Tandem Sculptionary” Is Another Game From Jimmy Fallon Adaptable To The ELL Classroom

I’ve shared many games from Jimmy Fallon Late Night’s show that I’ve modified for my ELL classroom.

Last night, he shared another called “Tandem Sculptionary.”

It’s basically a version of Pictionary. However, instead of drawing, players sculpt clay to use as clues. In this “tandem” game, one player sits behind another to use the clay. That’s not going to work for obvious reasons in most classrooms.

However, since I’ve got plenty of Play-Doh in my room (see Play-Doh & IB Theory Of Knowledge: Student Hand-Out & Videos), I figure just having a student stand in front and using the clay instead of a whiteboard to give clues would be an easy modification.

Let me know if you have other ideas.

Here’s how it worked on Late Night:

January 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“SuperTeacherTools” Is An Excellent Site For ELL Beginners To Create & Play Games

I’ve been doing a series of posts this week about tools my English Language Beginners have been using to create online content. This process has included many barriers, including older tech, District content filters, ease-of-use, and ensuring that tech brings an added value to what we’re doing.

But it has gone well. The past posts have been:

“Little Bird Tales” Is An Excellent Web 2.0 Tool For Beginning English Language Learners

Video: “Adobe Spark” Is Excellent Tool For ELLs

“Write About” Is Another Great Tool For ELLs

SuperTeacherTools is the latest tool that my students have used.  It’s been on The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games for awhile.

Students (and teachers) can create three types of games (images of two of them are at the top of this post) without having to register with the site.  It’s simple and very user-friendly.  My students create the games, post the links on our class blog, and then classmates play them.

I especially like the one that has a “drag-and-drop” interface.

Go to our class blog to try them out.  I’d love to find a tool that lets students create audio quizzes.  I’ll be exploring The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games more deeply to see if I’ve missed that feature in any of those sites.

I’m adding this post to The “All-Time” Best 2.0 Tools For Beginning English Language Learners.

December 30, 2016
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two

Here are this week’s choices:

Duolingo, everybody’s favorite language-learning tool, unveiled a new feature – the ability for users to create “clubs” so that they can exchange messages and share a “leaderboard” with their friends.  It sounds like it’s having some initial “hiccups,” but I could eventually see it as a useful tool for peer encouragement.

Students, some of them immigrants, write children’s books inspired by their own life’s journeys is from The Washington Post.

Five tips for using authentic video in the classroom is from The British Council and is pretty interesting. I’m adding it to The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL.

This is from 2015, but still interesting: Nine interesting foreign language research findings you may not know about from Language Gym.

ELT Sparks has a nice lesson idea in Most Influential Images. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons.

I’ve written several posts about TimeSlips, a program designed to assist dementia patients whose strategy I think is also useful for language-learning.  Here’s a new Voice of America video report on what they do:

I’ve previously written about Kahoot, and it’s on a couple of “Best” lists.  Here are a couple of tweets about a new feature that it has added:

This would be depressing if it happened:

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