Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Online Learning Games

 

Here are some new online learning games:

Fake It To Make It is an online game about fake news. I’m adding it to The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy – Help Me Find More.

I’m adding these next resources to The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories:

Mysterious Dog Final is a Choose Your Own Adventure story created by students. Here’s a post by their teacher explaining how they did it.

American Revolution: Choose Your Own Adventure looks interesting.

November 25, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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iCivics Adds Bilingual Social Studies Game

 

As I’ve mentioned before, I haven’t always been the biggest fan of iCivics, the popular learning games site begun by former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

I’ve thought that many (but not all) of their games have been overly-complicated, and they really put their foot in it with a horribly-done one on immigration (see Sandra Day O’Connor’s Site To Change Immigration Game Because Of Your Comments).

Last year, however, they began to make some very positive changes (see iCivics Steps Up Its Game Big Time With Free Virtual Classrooms & Primary Source Interactive).

They’ve followed those moves with another good one that is highlighted in today’s Washington Post: Spanish-language video game aims to teach students about civil rights.

Yes, they’ve produced a Spanish and an English version of the same game, Do I Have A Right?

I hope this is the first of many multilingual versions of their resources.

I’m adding this info to The Best Resources For “Bill Of Rights Day”

Thanks to Giselle Lundy-Ponce for the tip.

November 24, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Ed Tech Digest

Four years ago, in another somewhat futile attempt to reduce the backlog of resources I want to share, I began this occasional “Ed Tech Digest” post where I share three or four links I think are particularly useful and related to…ed tech:

Game On! is a Quizziz/Kahoot-like game that is primarily, though not exclusively, focused on Geography. I learned about it from the Teacher’s Tech Toolbox. I was having some issues with it when I tried it out, but I assume it was just a temporary glitch. I’m adding it to The Best Online Geography Games.

You can easily create and embed a chatbox with Minnit. Thanks to Nik Peachey for the tip. I’m adding it to The Best Online Tools For Real-Time Collaboration.

How to Use Twitter is a great guide from one of The NY Times social media staff. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning To Learn What Twitter Is All About, which is a list I definitely need to cull.

GCF Learn Free has a nice Typing Tutorial. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Learn Typing/Keyboarding.

November 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Make An Amazing Number Of Different Learning Games With “GameBuilder”

GameBuilder lets you create lots of different types of learning games – see the screenshot above to see the options.

Once you create it, anyone with its url address can play. The site also has a large collection of games created by its users.

The site is sponsored by Wisc-Online, which “is a creation of Wisconsin’s Technical Colleges and maintained by Fox Valley Technical College.”

And it’s free!

I’m adding this site to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

November 2, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Aquation” Is New Smithsonian Game About The World’s Freshwater Crisis

Aquation is a game just unveiled by the Smithsonian.

Here’s how they describe it:

Choice, strategy, balance, and . . . water equity? Parts of the planet are struggling to get enough water. Use each region’s wealth to build pipes, desalinate water, and conduct research to bring water where it’s needed most. Monsoons, dry spells, disease, and even cursed lawn sprinklers can help or hinder your progress. Manage your wealth and water carefully to solve the world’s water crisis!

It’s probably not accessible to Advanced ELLs and proficient-English speakers, but it’s a useful game, nevertheless.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About World Water Day.

October 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – Part Two

 

Time for another end-of-the-year ”The Best…” list.  I’m adding this post to All 2017 “Best” Lists – In One Place!

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site.

* be seen by me during the last six months of 2017. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017- Part Two:

Google Publishes Series Of Video Instructions About Creating Online “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

Bamboozle lets you create games your class can play by projecting them on a screen.  They seem easy to create, though I it doesn’t yet have that large of a collection of ones that other teachers have created.  You might also be interested in The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

Payback is a new free “choose your own adventure” quasi-game that’s designed to help students anticipate college costs. I heard about it through a recent New York Times article headlined A Game to Help Students Pay the Right Price for College. It’s definitely accessible, even though it’s a bit simplistic. I could see using it to initiate a conversation with students about college issues.I’m adding this info to: The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career.

Here are several new Geography games I’m adding to The Best Online Geography Games (thanks to Google Maps Mania for the tips).

They stand out from the ones presently on the list, which are all good – but very, very similar:

My Name Is Hunt uses maps, but is also a text-based “choose your own adventure” style of game (see more of them at The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories). It’s only accessible to advanced English Language Learners, but definitely is unusual.

urbanopticon is a game that incorporates the idea of “citizen science.” Here is how they explain it:

This game will show you randomly selected urban scenes and ask you where they are. In so doing, we capture your mental map – that is, which parts of the city you tend to correctly recognize. By combining your answers with other people’s, we are able to draw the collective mental map of the city. The collective map is important because it is associated with happiness. In his “The image of the city”, Kevin Lynch showed that the happiest areas are those that are easily recognized and, as such, are prominent in people’s minds. By knowing which areas are difficult to recognize, we are able to recommend urban interventions to different stakeholders, including local government, urban planners and artists.

Where In the World Looks like a very good game for students. Here is its description:

Play the game to explore country landmarks all over the world, from royal palaces to historical attractions. See if you can figure out where in the world you are!

TIME has created a neat new game called “Can You Draw The States?” You’re prompted to draw a state. Once you’re done, you’re graded on how well you did and it’s put on a blank U.S. map so you can ultimately see your complete work. In some ways, it’s similar to an older game called Scribble States.

Factitious is an engaging online game to teach about fake news. It could be a fun activity to do to finish-up a more extensive lesson on the topic. You can learn more about it at NPR’s article, To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game. You can also find lots of resources on teaching about fake news at The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy, including the lesson plan I did for The NY Times.

Carol Salva writes about the many ways teachers can use the Kahoot game with ELLs.

Quiz Game Master lets you easily many different types of learning games for students to play. You can see a list of all the different types on the image at the top of this post. Unfortunately, the site doesn’t automatically host the games – you either have to pay $5 annually for that feature or download the games you create as a zip file.

With both Jo Boaler and Dan Meyer endorsing Super Math World, I can only assume it’s a great math learning game.

I’m not a big fan of Word Searches, but they can sometimes be a fun activity for students to create. Word Search Labs is an easy tool for creating word searches online. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Making Crossword Puzzles & Hangman Games.

October 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

 

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Travel Map lets you create a “travel blog” documenting a trip on an interactive map. Sites like this one can be used by students to document a field trip, a journey from literature or history, or a military campaign. However, Travel Map is not as intuitive as I would like it to be, so I’m not sure it’s they best tool of its type, but it’s worth checking out. You can see other options at The Best Map-Making Sites On The Web.

Pictogon lets you create interactive images (dots you can click on to get more information on items or people in the picture). It’s nice, but you can only make a few before they start charging.  Check out The Best Online Tools For Using Photos In Lessons  to find other free or lower-cost alternatives.

Get Acquainted is a very intriguing online survey tool that creates “conversational polls.” I’d encourage you to read Richard Byrne’s post and watch his video about it. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Creating Online Polls & Surveys.

Bamboozle lets you create games your class can play by projecting them on a screen.  They seem easy to create, though I it doesn’t yet have that large of a collection of ones that other teachers have created.  You might also be interested in The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

GIF Maker, Video to GIF lets you easily…create GIF’s from videos.  I’m adding it to The Best Resources On GIFs — Please Contribute More, which I need to update.

September 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Payback” Is A “Choose Your Own Adventure” Tool To Help Students Envision College Costs

 

Payback is a new free “choose your own adventure” quasi-game that’s designed to help students anticipate college costs.

I heard about it through a recent New York Times article headlined A Game to Help Students Pay the Right Price for College.

It’s definitely accessible, even though it’s a bit simplistic. I could see using it to initiate a conversation with students about college issues.

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career

The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories

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