Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 6, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Geography Game: “Can You Draw The States?”

TIME has created a neat new game called “Can You Draw The States?”

You’re prompted to draw a state. Once you’re done, you’re graded on how well you did and it’s put on a blank U.S. map so you can ultimately see your complete work.

In some ways, it’s similar to an older game called Scribble States.

I’m adding it to The Best Online Geography Games.

Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip.

July 3, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Factitious” Is An Online Game To Teach About Fake News

Factitious is an engaging online game to teach about fake news. It could be a fun activity to do to finish-up a more extensive lesson on the topic.

You can learn more about it at NPR’s article, To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game.

You can also find lots of resources on teaching about fake news at The Best Tools & Lessons For Teaching Information Literacy, including the lesson plan I did for The NY Times.

July 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

Bamboozle lets you easily create and play learning games. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

You can easily create simple email newsletters with elink.  I’m adding it to The Best Applications For Creating Free Email Newsletters.

Google Photos adds smarter sharing, suggestions and shared libraries is from TechCrunch.

Hypersay is another tool to encourage audience feedback during presentations.

SankeyMATIC lets you easily build a Sankey diagram builder. No, I don’t really understand what it is, either, but it’s apparently a popular and respected kind of infographic. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

The Ultimate Screencasting Guide For Teachers And Students is by Heather Wolpert-Gawron.

July 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

Here are this week’s choices:

Bracing for a Showdown Over Immigration Rights, DACA is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Practical Resources For Helping Teachers, Students & Families Respond To Immigration Challenges.

Carol Salva writes about the many ways teachers can use the Kahoot game with ELLs.

Are You Practicing Culturally Responsive Teaching? is from Valentina Gonzalez. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About “Culturally Responsive Teaching” & “Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy” – Please Share More!

What’s new in ELT besides technology? is from Cambridge Press.

ESL Jigsaws by Nancy Callan has some great ideas about how to use the jigsaw strategy with ELLs, along with offering excellent materials.  I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

I also happened to learn about a good reading site for Intermediate ELLs called Talk Path Therapy.  Nancy writes about it here.

Here are several new additions to The Best Ways To Use Photos In Lessons:

You can find a bunch of “spot the difference” pictures here. I’ve found these useful as part of a classroom vocabulary game. You can find even more here.

I’ve sometimes shown photos to students, hid the captions, and challenged them to write their own. It’s easy hide the captions at The Atlantic Focus photo blog ; the Boston Globe’s Big Picture and The Sacramento Bee’s photo galleries. These three sites show large images with captions at the bottom of the photos that are easy to cover-up. In addition, Getty Images has the ability to click on an icon and have the captions disappear.

Speaking of captions, The British Council has a special site where ELLs can write captions for photos.

Finally, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, ELT Pics is a wonderful site for ELL teachers who want to use photos.

June 28, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Quiz Game Master” Is A Nice Tool For Creating Online Learning Games

Quiz Game Master lets you easily many different types of learning games for students to play. You can see a list of all the different types on the image at the top of this post.

Unfortunately, the site doesn’t automatically host the games – you either have to pay $5 annually for that feature or download the games you create as a zip file.

Nevertheless, I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games.

June 20, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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With Endorsements Like These, “Super Math World” Has Got To Be A Winner

With both Jo Boaler and Dan Meyer endorsing Super Math World, I can only assume it’s a great math learning game.

Here’s a video about it, followed by the tweets Jo and Dan sent out about the game:

May 20, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week In Web 2.0

'Web 2.0 paljastaa' photo (c) 2011, Janne Ansaharju - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth blogging about, I post a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” (you might also be interested in The Twenty-Five Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2017 – So Far). I also sometimes include tech tools or articles about them that might not exactly fit the definition of Web 2.0:

I’m not a big fan of Word Searches, but they can sometimes be a fun activity for students to create. Word Search Labs is an easy tool for creating word searches online. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Making Crossword Puzzles & Hangman Games.

Add Text lets you easily…add quotations on top of photos. I’m adding it to The Best Tools For Creating Visually Attractive Quotations For Online Sharing.

You can quickly and easily create online bar charts with Chartico.  I’m adding it to The Best Tools To Make Simple Graphs Online.  By the way, I just updated and revised that list.

Tolks is a great tool that lets you create animated dialogues. In many ways, it’s similar to the Google Docs Story Builder, which I was disappointed to see appears to have been shut down.  The main problem with Tolks is that you can only use it if you register with Twitter or Facebook, which isn’t going to work with students in schools with Internet content filters.

Slatebox appears to have a lot of bells and whistles.  However, the feature I like most is its ability to easily search, label, describe and connect photos.  That capability makes it a great tool for students to create picture data sets.  Plus, no registration is required.  I’m adding it to The Best Online Virtual “Corkboards” (or “Bulletin Boards”).  Thanks to Donna Baumbach for the tip.

Sketch Nation lets students easily create online games.

May 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017 – So Far

Time for another mid-year ”The Best…” list.

As usual, In order to make it on this list, games had to:

* be accessible to English Language Learners.

* provide exceptionally engaging content.

* not provide access to other non-educational games on their site.

* be seen by me during the first six months of 2017. So they might have been around prior to this time, but I’m still counting them in this year’s list.

You might also be interested in:

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2016 – So Far

The Best Websites For Creating Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2015 – So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2014

The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2013 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games Of 2012 — So Far

The Best Online Learning Games — 2011

The Best Online Learning Games — 2010

The Best Online Learning Games — 2009

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Online Learning Games Of 2017- So Far (Unlike in previous years, this is a very short list.  I hope the “Part Two” section at the end of this year is a longer one):

Quiznetic is a Kahoot-like tool that lets you create learning games in various racing forms. Students can then “race” each other in answering the questions and see their positions. It appears to be free, and seems simple to use.

Legends of Learning is a new site that provides custom-built games organized by learning objectives. Teachers can create “playlists” they want their students to access and then monitor their progress. They only have science-related games right now, but plan on adding more related to other subjects soon. You can read more about it at USA Today’s article, ‘Spotify for learning games’ coming to classrooms.  It appears the site is free for a month or so after registration (longer if you have fewer students) and then you have to review games, perform other services for the site, or pay per student.

Kupiter lets you easily create Asteroids-like games – without having to register. All you have to do is create some questions. Unfortunately, the answers have to spelled out – so it takes awhile to play.

 

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