Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

November 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

The Importance of Project Based Teaching is from The Buck Institute, and provides a unique historical perspective on Project-Based Learning. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

Wake Your Class Up with Simulations! is from Ingenious Teaching. I’m adding it to The Best Online Learning Simulation Games & Interactives — Help Me Find More.

The Berlin Wall in the cold war and now – interactive is from The Guardian. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Walls That Separate Us.

10 Tips for Delivering Awesome Professional Development is by Elena Aguilar at Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers.

Ask For Evidence is a very interesting new site based in the United Kingdom. Here is how it describes itself:

Ask for Evidence is a public campaign that helps people request for themselves the evidence behind news stories, marketing claims and policies.

We hear daily claims about what is good for our health, bad for the environment, how to improve education, cut crime, treat disease or improve agriculture. Some are based on reliable evidence and scientific rigour. Many are not.

How can we make companies, politicians, commentators and official bodies accountable for the claims they make? If they want us to vote for them, believe them or buy their products, then we should Ask for Evidence.

People come here to share their experiences of asking for evidence and to use the hub of resources and expertise to making sense of the evidence they receive.

It has potential to be an authentic audience for student projects, particularly for IB Theory of Knowledge classes.

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August 24, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

small things: increasing participation in classroom discussions is from Educating Grace.

No Time To Think is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Student & Teacher Reflection.

Free 2 Work is designed to:

Learn how your favorite brands relate to trafficking and other labor abuses. Free2Work provides consumers with information on forced and child labor for the brands and products they love.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Human Trafficking Today.

Google Wants To Improve Its Translations Through Crowdsourcing is from TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Google Translate & Other Forms Of Machine Translation.

Go Wild is an informative site about animals from the World Wildlife Federation (I learned about it via Richard Byrne). I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Animals.

Genius Hour and the 6 Essentials of Personalized Education is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Applying “Fed Ex Days” To Schools.

Researchers Discover “Superdialects” Through Twitter Study is from Read Write. I’m adding it to The Best “Language Maps.”

Smart Homework: How to Manage & Assess It is by Rick Wormeli. Smart Homework: 13 Ways to Make It Meaningful is also by Rick Wormeli. I’m adding them both to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

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August 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation and Growth Mindset in Writing is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students.

Inventing Infographics: Visual Literacy Meets Written Content is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

How to Talk About America’s Newest Arrivals is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

Smart Homework: Can We Get Real? is by Rick Wormeli at Middleweb. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

23 Incredibly Successful People Who Failed At First is from Business Insider. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures.

An Idiot’s Guide to Inequality is by Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.

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April 20, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

10 Reasons You Will Read This Medium Post is from…Medium. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Why We Like Lists.

The Power of Performance Assessments is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Performance Assessment.

What is a foreign language worth? is from The Economist. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning The Advantages To Being Bilingual.

Syria crisis: Uplifting letters of hope is from The BBC. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day.

18 Maps From When the World Thought California Was an Island is from Wired. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Historic Maps.

The What If’s of History is an interesting Storify. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons.

Welcome To Question Day 2014 has a lot of useful resources. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

Thinking Critically is from The University of British Columbia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Teaching & Learning Critical Thinking In The Classroom.

I’m adding these next two links to The Best Sites For Learning About Cesar Chavez:

What the New Cesar Chavez Film Gets Wrong About the Labor Activist is from Smithsonian Magazine.

The New Yorker has another critical take

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March 9, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — March (Part One)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

The Vocabulary of Test Directions is from Vocabulary.com, and provides links to help students learn the academic vocabulary list that Jim Burke has developed. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Lex for EFL has created some interactive academic vocabulary activities that are useful. I’m adding them to the same list.

The World History Project has a nice “What Happened On” site. I’m adding it to The Best “Today In History” Sites.

Can 10,000 hours of practice make you an expert? is from The BBC. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The 10,000 Hour Rule & Deliberate Practice.

Mount Everest security guards to stop fights is from Breaking News English. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Mount Everest.

A Life Well-Lived is a short, and good, video on the first American who reached the Everest summit. I’m adding it to the same list.

I’m adding this video to The Best Resources For Lessons On Trayvon Martin:

Comcast Indefinitely Extends Low-Cost Broadband for Poor Families is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Schools Providing Home Computers & Internet Access To Students.

Unexpected Africa: Investigating New Ways to Think About the Continent is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to A Beginning List Of The Best Geography Sites For Learning About Africa.

Picturing hunger in America is from the PBS News Hour. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About World Food Day.


If You Need More Power, This Backup Battery Can Survive Even When Your Phone Can’t
is from TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas On How To Stay Electronically Connected When The Power’s Out.

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February 9, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — February (Part Two)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

AL NBCT Network 21st Century Homework Success is a PowerPoint presentation by Rick Wormeli. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues.

Here’s a very useful Slideshare Presentation by Donalyn Miller:

5 ways to teach kids about the California drought is from Southern California Public Radio. I’m adding it to A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On California’s Drought.

Shouldn’t Every Day Be ‘Black History Month’? is from The Root. I’m adding it to The Best Websites To Teach & Learn About African-American History.

Don’t Be Boring: A Surefire Approach to Engaging Your Audience — Part 1 is by Nancy Duarte. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Making Good Presentations.

10 Great Lesson Planning Templates and Resources is from The Teaching Channel. I’m adding it to The Best Places On The Web To Write Lesson Plans — Who Have I Missed?

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February 1, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — February (Part One)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet about them.

Here are Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

13 words of the year from other countries is from The Week. I’m adding it to The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2013.

Protest Songs, From Seeger to Sting to Springsteen is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Protests In History.

Workers of the World, Faint! is from The NY Times. I’m adding it to the same list.

Wealth gap: A guide to what it is, why it matters is from The San Francisco Chronicle. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.

10 startling facts about global wealth inequality is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to the same list.

How Americans really feel about the gap between rich and poor is also from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to the list, too.

How Important is Grit in Student Achievement? is from MindShift. It gives a good overview of the research on the topic. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit.”

Stunning Before and After Photos of California’s Lakes Depleted by Extreme Drought is from The Weather Channel. I’m adding it to A Beginning List Of The Best Resources On California’s Drought.

Jim Burke has just unveiled his new, extremely helpful, website.

I’m adding video to The Best Sites For International Day Of The World’s Indigenous People. Thanks to Nancy Flanagan for the tip:

Here’s a useful worksheet and video on Nelson Mandela at Michelle Henry’s site. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Nelson Mandela.

If The World Were … An Infographic is from The ASIDE blog. I’m adding it to The Best Sites That Show Statistics By Reducing The World & The U.S. To 100 People.

Here Are All the Super Bowl Ads You Can See Before Sunday’s Big Game is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where ELL’s Can Learn About The Super Bowl.

The Dust Bowl is a PBS interactive using a “Choose Your Own Adventure” form. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories. Thanks to Richard Byrne for the tip.

National Flags Made From Each Country’s Traditional Foods is from is Marvelous. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

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January 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — January (Part Three)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet them.

Here are Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

8 Essentials for Project-Based Learning is from The Buck Institute. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning is from Teach Thought. I’m adding it to the same list.

Infographic Flipped Classroom is from Education Journey. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea.

What listening to a story does to our brains is from Buffer. I’m adding it to The Best Digital (& Non-Digital) Storytelling Resources.

What’s New on StopBullying.gov: A Redesigned Training Center Plus 11 User Guides is from StopBullying.gov. I’m adding it to A Very, Very Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Bullying.

Sticking With Students: Responding Effectively to Incorrect Answers is from Education Week Teacher.

Six Reasons Educators Say They Are Choosing Chromebooks Over iPads, Netbooks And PCs is from Forbes. It reinforces one of the education predictions I made for 2014.

Skills Practice | Persuading an Audience Using Logos, Pathos and Ethos is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For Helping Students Learn To Write Persuasive Essays.

Qi-Enabled Wireless Charger ARK Lets Mobile Users Cut The Cord is from TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas On How To Stay Electronically Connected When The Power’s Out.

Republican Ideas on Immigration Could Legalize Up to 6.5 Million, Study Says is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About The New Push For Immigration Reform.

The Neuroscience Guide to Negotiations With Iran is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Compromise.

Google+ for Schools is by Eric Curts. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning What Google+ Is All About.

Teachers stepping up when school violence erupts is from USA Today.

The Lure of the Technological Sublime: Morozov and the Makers is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Maker Movement.”

Rick Wormeli has just created a great website full of resources.

15 Technologies That Were Supposed To Change Education Forever is from Gizmodo. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The History Of Technology.

How Do Teachers Want Students to Cope with Boredom? is from ASCD. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On Boredom & How Students & Teachers Can Deal With It.

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January 12, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — January (Part Two)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

The Comcast-Khan Academy Partnership Could Be Trouble is from Slate. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Schools Providing Home Computers & Internet Access To Students.

I’m adding this video to The Best Sites For Learning About Nutrition & Food Safety:

Resolve.To.Improve. is from Burkins and Yaris. I’m adding it to The Best Ways To Help Make Your New Year’s Resolutions Succeed.

DEATH TO POWERPOINT: HOW TO SPEAK LIKE A PRO WITHOUT THE SLIDES is from Fast Company. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Making Good Presentations.

Check out The Museum of Online Museums.

Mophie’s Powerstation XL Packs In The Power For Extended Time Away From Outlets is from TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas On How To Stay Electronically Connected When The Power’s Out.

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January 5, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — January (Part One)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Good Time: 4 Ways to Reawaken Student Engagement is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On Student Engagement.

8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Developing Academic English Skills & Vocabulary.

Teaching with Google+ is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning What Google+ Is All About.

Eric Sheninger hosts a very, very interesting discussion about using Google+ vs. using Twitter. I’m adding it to the same list.

A Question for the New Year: What Do You Want to Be Remembered For? is from TIME. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Doing A “One-Sentence Project.”

“Because” Wins 2013 Word of the Year Vote, Because Awesome is by Ben Zimmer. I’m adding it to The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2013.

Misspelling of the Year 2013 is from Dictionary.com. I’m adding it to the same list.

Economists agree: Raising the minimum wage reduces poverty is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Why Raising The Minimum Wage Is Important.

There’s a new official Bob Marley site. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Bob Marley.

From Flying Boats to Jumbo Jets: 100 Years of Commercial Flight is a Wall Street Journal slideshow. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Flight.

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December 15, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — December (Part Two)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

I’m adding these next two posts/articles to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools:

IPads for L.A. teachers to be postponed under new plan is from The Los Angeles Times.

Miami-Dade Pauses 1-to-1 Computing Initiative, Considers Big Changes is from Education Week.

Skills Practice | Distinguishing Between Fact and Opinion is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Online Resources For Helping Students Learn To Write Persuasive Essays.

Your first year teaching, in one chart is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Advice For New Teachers.

Great Questions is an excellent site from Story Corps. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions — Help Me Find More.

Who’s Biggest? The 100 Most Significant Figures in History is from TIME. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About World History.

I’m adding this New York Times video on earthquakes and fracking to The Best Sites For Learning About Earthquakes:

Google Tips is a new site from Google that provides simple…tips to people about how to use Google tools. Thanks to Richard Byrne for the tip. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Learn Web 2.0 Basics.

Nelson Mandela’s Funeral in Pictures is from TIME. I’m adding it to The Best Resources Honoring Nelson Mandela At His Passing….

Honoring the Virgin of Guadalupe is a photo gallery from The LA Times. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning & Teaching About The Day Of The Virgin Of Guadalupe.

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December 8, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — December (Part One)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

A Mid-Year Reflection for Teachers and Students is by Maurice Elias at Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Student & Teacher Reflection.

‘Vining’ the Bill of Rights: History lesson taps social media is from The PBS News Hour. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video App “Vine.”

A List of Reasons Why Our Brains Love Lists is from The New Yorker. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Why We Like Lists.

Fake and Real Student Voice is a thoughtful post by Dean Shareski.

What gives us a right to deport people? Joseph Carens on the ethics of immigration is a really interesting interview at The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About The New Push For Immigration Reform.

In Olympic Sochi, a Photographic Pregame is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games.

Tips for Bloggers to Remember is by Doug Peterson. I’m adding it to The Best Sources Of Advice For Teachers (And Others!) On How To Be Better Bloggers.

Clarifying Transfer & How It Impacts What We Think Students Understand is by Grant Wiggins. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Concept Of “Transfer” — Help Me Find More.

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November 9, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — November (Part Two)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions.

For Teachers, Wired Classrooms Pose New Management Concerns is from Education Week.

Here’s a Thanksgiving vocabulary quiz from Rene Maufroid. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn & Teach About Thanksgiving.

Skills Practice | Writing Effective Openings is an exceptional lesson plan at The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For K-12 Writing Instruction/Reinforcement.

Increasing Student Engagement By Grading Backwards is from TeachThought. I’m not that thrilled with the idea that it suggests — I think it promotes extrinsic motivation even more than the typical grading system. However, it is an innovative concept. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Grading Practices.

5 Point Free Assessment Strategies is from A Fine Balance. I’m adding it to that same grading practice list.

In Defense of Food Stamps is from, of all places, The Wall Street Journal.

How I Talk to My High-School Students About the Internet is from The Atlantic.

Simple ways to differentiate materials for mixed level classes is an excellent post by Rachael Roberts. It’s focused on language teaching, but the ideas can be applied to any class. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction.

Accurately Defining Formative Assessment is from Teach Learn Grow. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment.

Why teach math? is by David Wees.

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November 1, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — November (Part One)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Flipped Classrooms: A Method For Mastery? appeared in The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea.

Flipping Over “Flipped Classroom” Lit is from All MOOCs, All The Time. I’m adding it to the same list.

Making Robots More Like Us appeared in The NY Times. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Robots.

America does not have equal opportunity, in one chart is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality.

The 50 Greatest Breakthroughs Since the Wheel is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Learn About Inventions.

8 Types Of Infographics & Which One To Use When is a useful series of…infographics. I’m adding them to The Best Resources For Creating Infographics.

What’s In A Name? is a great post over at Nancy Flanagan’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best Places For Students To Learn About…Their Names.

NRA Calls For Teachers To Keep Loaded Gun Pointed At Class For Entire School Day is from The Onion. I’m adding it to The Best Education Articles From “The Onion.”

Here’s a video of Mount Etna erupting. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Volcanoes:




What Cool Looks Like Around the World is from Slate. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

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October 26, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” – October (Part Five)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Turning Down the Volume on Assumptions: Lessons about Close Reading is from Burkins & Yaris. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Close Reading.”

101 Objects That Made America is from The Smithsonian. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About U.S. History.

History of Halloween traditions timeline is very accessible. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Halloween.

Do You Believe In Ghosts? is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to the same list.

Twitter Illiterate? Mastering the @BC’s is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning To Learn What Twitter Is All About.

Gliding High: Designing Paper Airplanes Based on the Physics of Flight is a lesson plan from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Flight.

Airships is a photo gallery from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to the same list.

Newting, Plutoed, and Heaven-O: 20 Years of Dumb New Words is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best “Words Of The Year” Features For 2012.

I’m adding this video to The Best Sites For Learning About “Cool” Cars (& Designing Your Own!):

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October 20, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” – October (Part Four)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 is a photo gallery from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Wildlife Photographs Of The Year.

These images show just how differently cats and humans see the world is from io9. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Walking In Someone Else’s Shoes.

Classroom Guide: Top Ten Tips for Assessing Project-Based Learning (now available in Spanish!) is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Cooperative Learning Ideas.

Breathtaking images of the living bridges of India is from The Mother Nature Network. I’m adding it to The Best Images Of Spectacular Bridges (& How Students Can Make Their Own).

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Ideas To Help Students Become Better Listeners.

Social-Emotional Programs Target Students’ Long-Term Behavior is from Education Week. I’m adding it to
The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

Google’s Ngram Viewer Goes Wild is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Posts To Help Understand Google’s “Books Ngram Viewer.”

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October 17, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” – October (Part Three)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Varsity Tutors has quite an extensive collection of online practice tests. I’m adding it to A Beginning “The Best…” List Of Free & Decent Online Practice Sites For State Tests.

The Historic Scale of Syria’s Refugee Crisis is an impressive interactive from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day.

The Wider Image looks like a great Ipad app for viewing slideshows about current events. You can read more about it at Richard Bryne’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning iPad Users.

What does the US citizenship exam actually test? is from PRI. It shares an interesting perspective, and also includes an interactive quiz. I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Learning About Civic Participation & Citizenship.

Bullying Is Bad, But Do We Know How To Stop It? is by Paul Bruno. I’m adding it to A Very, Very Beginning List Of The Best Resources On Bullying.

Text to Text | ‘Enrique’s Journey’ and ‘In Trek North, First Lure Is Mexico’s Other Line’ is from The New York Times Learning Network. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

Teach With Movies has been a very helpful site for years sharing lesson plans and student hand-outs to use with popular movies. Happily, it is now free to use (it used to cost an annual fee), and I think can be helpful to teachers — especially for substitute teacher plans!

Classic Discovery Videos has a number of good earthquake-related videos. I’m adding the site to The Best Sites For Learning About Earthquakes.

What One of the World’s Great Novelists Learned About Writing from David Ogilvy is from CopyBlogger, and shares some thoughts from Salman Rushdie. I’m adding it to The Best Writing Advice From Famous Authors.

10 reasons for Genius Hour; 10 signs it will fail is by Sylvia Martinez. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Applying “Fed Ex Days” To Schools.

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October 7, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Special Edition Of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” — October (Part Two)

(Usually, I just post a weekly version of this regular feature. However, sometimes I post an extra “Special Edition” when I have more good links than usual)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here is a Special Edition of “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking is from Edutopia. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Teaching & Learning Critical Thinking In The Classroom.

Walk Free has a number of resources about human slavery today, including the video embedded below. I’m adding the link to The Best Resources For Learning About Human Trafficking Today.

I’ve previously posted about Bridge 8′s great critical thinking animations, which I’ve used in IB Theory of Knowledge classes. Now they’ve come out with another series of animations, this time on “This Thing Called Science.” Since we were just discussing empiricism in our class today, tomorrow I’ll be showing this video from this new collection:

I’m a proud public school teacher. Here’s a glimpse at what I do. is a must-read from TeacherBiz (thanks to Dan Willingham for the tip).

8 Condescending Things a Manager Should Avoid Saying to an Employee is from Great Leadership. Just substitute “student” for “employee” and you’ll find it to be a very helpful reminder.

Blogging Resources for Classroom Teachers is from Bill Ferriter. I’m adding it to The Best Sources For Advice On Student Blogging.

The New Yorker has a slideshow of student uniforms from around the world. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

Blobfish voted world’s ugliest animal is from The Guardian. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Animals.

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October 6, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” – October (Part One)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

Homocide Hunter is a very interactive game from The Discovery Channel. It can be played with a webcam or not. It’s a combination of a chatbot and a choose your own adventure game. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories.

Yosemite National Park, Closed on Its 123rd Birthday is a slideshow from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Yosemite & Other U.S. National Parks.

A Map of the Uneven Spread of Happiness in the World is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About…Happiness?

11 fascinating funeral traditions from around the globe is from TED Talks. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

The Museum Of Online Museums collects links to….many online museums.

This is Why No One Follows You On Twitter is from Mashable. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning To Learn What Twitter Is All About.

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September 29, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t” – September (Part Three)

'forged link chain (5)' photo (c) 2009, Kirsten Skiles - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

I have a huge backlog of resources that I’ve been planning to post about in this blog but, just because of time constraints, have not gotten around to doing. Instead of letting that backlog grow bigger, I regularly grab a few and list them here with a minimal description. It forces me to look through these older links, and help me organize them for my own use. I hope others will find them helpful, too. These are resources that I didn’t include in my “Best Tweets” feature because I had planned to post about them, or because I didn’t even get around to sending a tweet sharing them.

Here are This Week’s “Links I Should Have Posted About, But Didn’t”:

‘Growth Mindset’ Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

Climate Change Has Reached Our Shores is by the President Of The Marshall Islands, and appeared in the New York Times. We have a number of Marshallese students at our school, and I have related resources at The Best Sites For Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

For Schools Implementing iPads, the Importance of Being Patient is from Mindshift. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Beginning iPad Users.

And if you want to read about a district that didn’t show any patience — or even common sense — in implementing an iPad program, read about what is happening in Los Angeles.

Grow Your Network: Become a Detective is by Langwitches. I’m adding it to The Best Guides For Helping Teachers Develop Personal Learning Networks.

YouTube’s Cutest Baby Panda Videos is a great collection. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Learn About Pandas.

A Nation Built for Immigrants is from The Wall Street Journal. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

Digital Worksheets is by John Spencer. I’m adding it to The Best Advice On Using Education Technology.

Child labour falls by a third to 168 million, says ILO is from The Guardian. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For The World Day Against Child Labor.

The One Conversational Tool That Will Make You Better At Absolutely Everything is from Fast Company. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions — Help Me Find More.

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