Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 20, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources & Ideas For Using Sound Effects In ELL Lessons

I sometimes use sound effects with my English Language Learner classes as a game (playing sounds, let’s say, of animals and having groups having to identify its name) or as story-writing prompts (play some sounds in sequence and have students write parts of a related story).

Generally, I find Free Sound as the easiest place to find them, but I have lots of others sites at The Best Places To Get Royalty-Free Music & Sound Effects.

Here are some posts other ELL (and non-ELL) teachers have written about how they’ve used sound effects with their students:

Teaching With Sound Effects by Hall Houston.

The Sound Book by Mike Harrison.

Using sound in the classroom is from Learn NC.

ESL Halloween Lesson Plan – Scary video and sounds

Here’s an animal sound quiz.

July 16, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Apollo 11 Launched On This Day In 1969 – Here Are Related Resources

Apollo 11 launched on this day in 1969.

You might be interested in:

The Best Sites To Learn About The Apollo 11 Moon Landing

The Best Resources For Learning About Neil Armstrong

July 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Ed Tech Digest

Three years ago, in another somewhat futile attempt to reduce the backlog of resources I want to share, I began this occasional “Ed Tech Digest” post where I share three or four links I think are particularly useful and related to…ed tech:

Why Do Students in Personalized Learning Programs Feel Less Positive About School? is from Ed Tech Strategies. This is why I think “personalized learning” needs to include tech AND non-tech components. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding “Personalized Learning”

Personalized Learning: Modest Gains, Big Challenges, RAND Study Finds is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to the same list.

I thought this was an interesting concept: “Highbrow is an email subscription service that brings bite-sized courses straight to your inbox every morning. All courses are 10 days long (so you don’t get bored) and are broken down into 5-minute lessons to make sure you can read them with your morning coffee.”

Google launches a new Backup & Sync desktop app for uploading files and photos to the cloud is a TechCrunch post. I had no idea that Google offered this kind of service that would back up your files to Google Docs. I’ve been using Dropbox (and Mozy) for years. What advantages or disadvantages do you see to using Google’s service? I’m adding this info to The Best Ways To Back-Up Your Computer & Online Work.

Free Wi-Fi Doesn’t Mean Safe Wi-Fi, And Neither Does Having the Password is from NBC News. I’m adding it to The Best Advice On Protecting Our Digital Info.

July 2, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Ed Tech Digest

Three years ago, in another somewhat futile attempt to reduce the backlog of resources I want to share, I began this occasional “Ed Tech Digest” post where I share three or four links I think are particularly useful and related to…ed tech:

Instant Virtual Field Trips is from Ditch That Textbook. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Finding And Creating Virtual Field Trips (which I just revised and updated).

Two Programs Providing Internet Access to Low-income Homes is from Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Schools Providing Home Computers & Internet Access To Students.

How Silicon Valley Pushed Coding Into American Classrooms is from The New York Times.

Google Earth comes to the classroom with new educational tours and lesson plans comes from TechCrunch. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Google Earth Beginners Like Me.

Ten Ways to Use Google Earth In Your Classroom – Handout is from Richard Byrne. I’m adding it to the same list.

30 Hands Learning is yet another site that lets you create virtual classrooms and monitor the progress students are making in creating projects. I’m adding it to The Best Sites Where Students Can Work Independently & Let Teachers Check On Progress.  By the way, that list is now getting so lengthy that I think it will be the next topic of an “All-Time Best” list where I can narrow it down a bit.

ClassCraft also lets you create virtual classroom and supposedly turn learning into some sort of adventure game. I’m adding it to the same list.

June 30, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Yosemite Became A Protected Area On This Day In 1864 – Here Are Related Resources


On this day in 1864:

President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill establishing Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove as protected wilderness areas. It was the first time in U.S. history that land was designated for public use and preservation, and is viewed by many as the birth of the national parks system.

You can see the actual bill here.

I’ve just updated and revised The Best Sites For Learning About Yosemite & Other U.S. National Parks.

June 27, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two New & Intriguing Articles About Geography

Here are two new and intriguing articles that I’m adding to The Best Websites For Learning & Teaching Geography.

Neither are accessible to most English Language Learners, but portions could easily be modified by teachers.

From Ptolemy to GPS, the Brief History of Maps is from Smithsonian Magazine.

Persuasive Cartography: How Maps are Used to Shape Our Beliefs is from Geo Lounge (thanks to Rick Wormeli).

June 25, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Four years ago I began this regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention.

You might also be interested in The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2016 – Part Two and The Best Resources, Articles & Blog Posts For Teachers Of ELLs In 2017 – So Far.

By the way, today is the day Katie Hull and I officially began writing our next book on teaching ELLs.  It’s going to be a crazy summer, so I’ll probably be posting less than I have in the past….

Here are this week’s choices:

Drawception is an online site where users play a weird but fun combination of Pictionary and the Telephone game. It’s been around for awhile, but they now finally added the ability to create private virtual rooms so that you can control who you get to play with – a must if teachers are going to use it with students. I’ve added it to The Best Online Games Students Can Play In Private Virtual “Rooms” and just updated the entire list.

In reviewing some of my older posts, I rediscovered The British Game from the British Council. It has a lot of nice videos, but its key quality is having many follow-up interactives for each one. I’ll definitely have my Intermediate students try it out next year.

Another site I revisited is Scott Thornbury’s index at his blog, An A-Z of ELT. Check it out!

Eight Characteristics of Effective (& Awesome) ESL Teachers is from Valentina Gonzalez.

Netflix has begun creating online video “Choose Your Own Adventure” stories. Unfortunately, they only work on a touch screen for now, not within the browser of a computer. These kinds of stories are great for ELLs, though, and I’m adding the info to The Best Places To Read & Write “Choose Your Own Adventure” Stories.

Google has allowed Voice Dictation for awhile on Google Docs (see Google Docs Expands Voice-Typing Ability Expanding Language-Learning Possibilities). Microsoft is now late to the party and offers an extension to do something similar for Word.

Too Few ELL Students Land in Gifted Classes is from Ed Week.

LingoKids is a new online English program for younger children. They have a supposedly free program for teachers, but you can’t try it out without giving your contact information and then have a representative contact you. You can read more the company at TechCrunch.

North Jersey teen, among first Syrian refugees in U.S., graduates near top of class is from a New Jersey newspaper. Thanks to Alexander Russo for the tip.

Four Teacher Collaboration FAQs is from Tan Huynh.

I recently posted What’s Your Best Lesson For Beginning Or Intermediate English Language Learners? and the two first responses I received were from great teachers:

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words…But How Do We Get Those Words Out? is from Valentina Gonzalez.

Summer Vacation! is from David Deubelbeiss.

Here’s a video from Carol Salva:

June 24, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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July 1st Is Canada Day – Here Are Related Resources

July 1st is Canada Day:

On July 1, 1867, the nation was officially born when the Constitution Act joined three provinces into one country: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Canada province, which then split into Ontario and Quebec.

You might be interested in The Best Sites To Learn About Canada.

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