Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

September 7, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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What’s “Popular” Via The New York Times

'Most popular page is the cafeteria menu' photo (c) 2010, Jacob Bøtter - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I periodically post places to find resources that are supposedly the “most popular” of something or other. I might or might not agree with the criteria used to determine that popularity, but I nevertheless find some useful pieces of information.

You can find a collection of these sites at The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators – 2013 (So Far).

Today, The New York Times published What It Means to Be Popular (When Everything Is Popular), which includes “most popular” lists of a variety of topics, including:

Top Pet Names in the USA
Top Baby Names in NYC
Most-Stolen Author
Top-Rated Shakespeare
Most Pirated Movie

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August 14, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“The Top Twitter Feeds in Education Policy”

I periodically post places to find resources that are supposedly the “most popular” of something or other. I might or might not agree with the criteria used to determine that popularity, but I nevertheless find some useful pieces of information.

You can find a collection of these sites at The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators – 2013 (So Far).

The Top Twitter Feeds in Education Policy is a new “popular” listing that has been created by Mike Petr1lli. It’s worth a look.

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June 20, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators – 2013 (So Far)

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I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

I’ve made quite a few posts that fit into this category, and thought I’d highlight which ones I thought were the best and most useful for educators.

You might also be interested in previous editions:

The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators – 2012 (So Far)

The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators –2011

The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators –2010

The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators –2009

Here are my choices for The Best Places To Find The Most Popular (& Useful) Resources For Educators — 2013 (So Far):

Google has just unveiled “Top Charts,” which show the top things that people are searching for in multiple categories.

Here are a couple of examples:

You can read more about it at TechCrunch.

The YouTube Trends Map shows which videos are popular in different regions of the United States and in many countries of the world, along with further filtering by the age of viewers. Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip.

TED-ED is the K-12 video “arm” for the famous TED Talks, and they’ve recently published a list of their “Top 10 most popular TED-Ed lessons!”

USC Rossier Online, associated with the University of Southern California,  unveiled a rating system for education blogs that they call The Teach 100.

Another organization just published their own updated list of the “top 100 influential education blogs,” ranked by their “Onalytica Influence Index.”

Five years ago, Flickr and the Library Of Congress joined forces to create Flickr Commons — a compilation of public domain photographs. Since that time, other institutions have also joined in. They just released a collection of their most viewed photos during that time, and it’s pretty neat.

Here are various presentations of them that have appeared throughout the Web:

Flickr celebrates Commons’ fifth year and 250k photos with galleries of most viewed pics is from The Next Web.

Flickr Commons’ most-viewed or most-favourited photos of the last five years is a slideshow from The Telegraph.

Flickr Commons marks 5-year anniversary with galleries of most-viewed pics is from DP Review.

The pictures we love best: Flickr celebrates fifth birthday with its most viewed images is from The Mail Online.

Feedback is always welcome.

If you found this post useful, you might want to consider subscribing to this blog for free.

You might also want to explore the 1100 other “The Best…” lists I’ve compiled.

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May 22, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Google’s New “Top Charts” Looks Pretty Interesting

Google has just unveiled “Top Charts,” which show the top things that people are searching for in multiple categories.

Here are a couple of examples:

You can read more about it at TechCrunch.

I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and photos and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new resources, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

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May 7, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

See the most popular videos by city and region (& by age of viewers)

The YouTube Trends Map shows which videos are popular in different regions of the United States and in many countries of the world, along with further filtering by the age of viewers. Thanks to Flowing Data for the tip.

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About The World’s Different Cultures.

I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and photos and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new resources, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

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February 5, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
3 Comments

Another Interesting List Of “Top” Education Blogs

Less than one month after USC Rossier Online, associated with the University of Southern California, unveiled a rating system for education blogs that they call The Teach 100, another organization has come up with their own list The 100 most influential education blogs.

This is how they explain the process they used:

At a basic level the index is built using Onalytica’s sophisticated data analysis tools, which are used by companies like Microsoft, Samsung, SAP and HP.

Based on the number of links that each blog receives, we developed three measures: Influence Index, Popularity and Over-Influence.

The Onalytica Influence Index is the impact factor of a blog, or how much that blog matters.

Popularity represents how popular or well-known the blog is among other education blogs.

Over–Influence seeks to capture how influential a blog is compared to how popular it is. There is a strong correlation between how popular or well-known a blog is and its influence. However some blogs carry more influence than their popularity leads us to believe; this is what we call over-influence.

I don’t really understand what that means. However, these kinds of lists are always interesting to see if there are blogs that I’m missing.

For what it’s worth, they found that my blog was the most popular one, but it was not the most influential one.

Here’s a direct link to their PDF of the list so you can see who was…

Thanks to Sean Banville for the tip.

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January 19, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Most Viewed Flickr Commons Images

Five years ago, Flickr and the Library Of Congress joined forces to create Flickr Commons — a compilation of public domain photographs. Since that time, other institutions have also joined in. They just released a collection of their most viewed photos during that time, and it’s pretty neat.

Here are various presentations of them that have appeared throughout the Web:

Flickr celebrates Commons’ fifth year and 250k photos with galleries of most viewed pics is from The Next Web.

Flickr Commons’ most-viewed or most-favourited photos of the last five years is a slideshow from The Telegraph.

Flickr Commons marks 5-year anniversary with galleries of most-viewed pics is from DP Review.

The pictures we love best: Flickr celebrates fifth birthday with its most viewed images is from The Mail Online.

I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and photos and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

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January 9, 2013
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Is The “Teach 100″ A Worthy Successor To PostRank?

I, and many others, found PostRank to be a very helpful way to evaluate, and learn about, blogs in many areas, including education. However, it joined the ranks of many worthy online tools that were bought by Google and then shut down.

Now, USC Rossier Online, associated with the University of Southern California, has unveiled a rating system for education blogs that they call The Teach 100.

They change the rankings daily, and use this formula to rank engagement:

There are four major components of the Teach100 score, which are aggregated when calculating a blog’s Teach100 ranking. These four components are:

Social (40%) – Engagement as determined through its combined Facebook shares, Tweets and StumbleUpon visits to the blog and its most recent posts. Ranking weighs shares pointing back to the blogs 10 most recent posts as well as for its main domain.

Activity (20%) – The frequency of a blog’s updates. The more frequently a blog is updated, the higher its activity score

Authority (20%) – The overall authority and influence relative to the rest of the web as determined by the number of sites linking to the blog. This methodology is one of the foundations of the Google Search Algorithm and is a commonly used measure of a website’s authority.

Teach Score (20%) – This is the single subjective factor in the evaluation of the Teach100. The Teach Score considers how media is used throughout a blog, how topics in education are discussed, the timeliness of blog content, the capacity to inform, and the overall presentation of the blog.

They presently rank Inside Higher Ed at number one; The New York Times Learning Network at number two, and Edutopia at number three.

This blog is ranked number twelve.

I’m always wary of “engagement” rankings and formulas, but lists like these are always useful for discovering new blogs and resources.

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