Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 7, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Most Popular Digg Stories From Throughout The Year

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today I’d like to share about a new collection and data visualization feature at Digg, the social bookmarking and ranking site. It’s called Digg365, and it allows you to see the top ten stories from each month of the past year.

Thanks to Information Aesthetics for the tip.

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December 5, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“The Top 25 Web Searches of the Decade”

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites, books, or other items that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites or provide intriguing data, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

About.com just completed some research and posted “The Top 25 Web Searches of the Decade.”

Here are their top ten (you can go to their site to learn the rest)

1. Facebook
2. Baidu
3. MySpace
4. World Cup
5. Wikipedia
6. Britney Spears
7. Harry Potter
8. Shakira
9. Lord of the Rings
10. Barack Obama

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November 25, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Most Popular Websites Of All Time (Measured In A Little Different Way)

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

://URLFAN measures the popularity of websites by blog mentions. In fact, you can type in the url address of any website and learn how popular it is using this measurement.

It also has what it calls “All-Time Top 100 Ranked Websites Listing most mentioned websites by bloggers.” Here are it’s top ten:

#1. en.wikipedia.org

#2. youtube.com

#3. flickr.com

#4. twitter.com

#5. google.com

#6. myspace.com

#7. facebook.com

#8. imdb.com

#9. nytimes.com

#10. apple.com

Thanks to Read Write Web for the tip..

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November 3, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Find-Out What “Links” Are Most Popular

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share about two new applications that I’m adding to my post on how to find The Most Popular Links Being “Retweeted” On Twitter.

The first is Topsy, which lets you identify the top 100, top 1000 and the top 5000 links to sites that are being retweeted. Thanks to TechCrunch for the tip.

The other is more expansive than just Twitter but, for lack of a better place to put it, in adding it to the “retweets” list. It’s called Splurb, and it ranks links based on their popularity among several social networks — including Twitter. Thanks to Mashable for the tip.

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September 11, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults”

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites or books that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites or books, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share the American Library Association’s Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults.

They have their lists divided into themes, and there are a lot of them. You can find them all on that main page. Here’s a sampling of just a few of their recent lists:

Death & Dying: Death can be an adventure, but not everyone lives to tell about it.

Fame & Fortune: Stardom! Wealth!  Notoriety! Read all about teens aspiring to make it big.

Journey>Destination: Life is an open road when the journey is greater than the destination.

Spies & Intrigue: Political intrigue, daring deeds, great escapes, and more in this thrilling list of fiction and nonfiction about those who operate within the world of shadow.

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September 3, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Finding The Most Popular “Search” Terms

This may sound like a bit of a strange post for my “most popular” series, but please bear with me for a moment.

Google Insights is a tool that allows you to map how often, and from where, people use specific search terms. TechCrunch has a useful post about it.

When I checked to see users from which countries most searched for the term “ESL,” the top three were South Korea, Cambodia, and Mongolia. When I checked on the term “EFL,” the top three were Oman, South Korea, and Poland. And when I checked “English,” the top three were Cambodia, Mongolia, and Pakistan.

I could see this site having some opportunities to create conversation in the classroom. For example, I think it could initiate an interesting conversation with Hmong students to find that the term “Hmong” was searched for most, by far, in Laos, where some Hmong still live and from where my students’ families fled. Then, when I searched for “General Vang Pao,” the most well-known leader of the Hmong here in the United States and one of several people arrested here in Sacramento last year for allegedly planning a coup in Laos, practically all the searches came from within the United States.

I have to think a little bit more about how this new tool can be used and am interested in hearing other ideas.

In addition, here are a couple of other resources for finding the most popular “search” terms:

What People Search For – Most Popular Keywords is an article that appeared almost three years ago sharing a lot places where people could find this type of info. Surprisingly enough, practically all of the links are still live, accurate, and useful.

Chromomulator is a new site that “takes the top 100 Google searches at the moment (from Google Trends) and scours the web, collecting related news, blog posts, pictures, and videos for each search. If you need to know everything about what’s hot on the net right now, the Chromomulator can tell you. Updated several times daily.”

As I mentioned earlier in this post, I’d be interested in hearing ideas on how to use these sites and their information effectively in the classroom.

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August 31, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

“The 50 most-viewed Wikipedia articles in 2009 and 2008″

The United Kingdom newspaper The Guardian just wrote an article listing “The 50 most-viewed Wikipedia articles in 2009 and 2008.”

The top ten are:

1) Wiki (131,383 page hits per day)

2) The Beatles (111,896)

3) Michael Jackson (79,734)

4) Favicon.ico (78,077)

5) YouTube (72,318)

6) Wikipedia (52,542)

7) Barack Obama (49,401)

8)Deaths in 2009 (48,758)

9) United States (46,545)

10) Facebook (42,679)

You can go to the article to see the rest of the list.

Wikipedia itself has a continually updated list (hourly) of its most popular pages.

Thanks to Read Write Web for the tip.

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

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August 18, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Most Popular Links Being “Retweeted” On Twitter

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites (and books) that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share two tools to use if you want to know which website links are the most popular on Twitter — in other words, what links to sites are being “retweeted” (or forwarded) most often.

There are other similar applications, but these two seem to me to be the best.  I’d be happy to hear if I’m missing something.

One is TweetMeme. It’ll show you lists of the most popular links being retweeted over three periods: “most recent,” 24 hours, and 7 days. You can also view the links by category.

Twitturly is a much more simple application that has fewer categories and only tracks popularly over a 24 hour period of time.

Topsy lets you identify the top 100, top 1000 and the top 5000 links to sites that are being retweeted. Thanks to TechCrunch for the tip.

The other is more expansive than just Twitter but, for lack of a better place to put it, in adding it to the “retweets” list. It’s called Splurb, and it ranks links based on their popularity among several social networks — including Twitter. Thanks to Mashable for the tip.

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August 17, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Buzz Feed

Buzz Feed is another place to find what are supposedly the most popular videos on the Web. The selection appears to include some “raunchier” ones than the other sites I have listed in my post on the best places to find the Most Popular Online Videos, but it does seem to have some other useful funny ones that could be used for activities with English Language Learners. I don’t know how they determine their selection — it’s obviously using a different methodology than the others.

I’m adding the link to that “most popular” post.

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August 12, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Most Popular Search Queries Used By Kids

This is my usual introduction to one of these “most popular” posts:

As regular readers know, I’ve been posting “most popular” lists of websites that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share the most popular search search queries used by kids.  Though I’m not quite sure how they figured them out (Richard Byrne was kind enough to share an explanation in the comments on this post), Online Family Norton has a list of the top 100.

Here are the top 20 on their list (you need to go to their site to get the rest):

# 1. YouTube
# 2. Google
# 3. Facebook
# 4. Sex
# 5. MySpace
# 6. Porn
# 7. Yahoo
# 8. Michael Jackson
# 9. Fred (A popular fictional character whose YouTube channel has become a hit among kids.)
# 10. eBay
# 11. You Tube
# 12. YouTube.com
# 13. Gmail
# 14. Wikipedia
# 15. Miley Cyrus (Singer and star of the Disney Channel’s hit series “Hannah Montana.”)
# 16. Webkinz (Toy stuffed animal that comes with a secret code, allowing kids access to the Webkinz World website.)
# 17. Games
# 18. Miniclip (Website with a variety of free online games.)
# 19. Taylor Swift (Country-pop singer)
# 20. Hotmail

Thanks to Read Write Web for the tip.

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August 6, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Most Popular Animal Videos

This is my usual introduction to one of these “most popular” posts:

As regular readers know, I’ve been posting “most popular” lists of websites that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

I’ve found that short funny animal videos are great to show to English Language Learner students and then — together — we write about what we saw.  In addition, I”ve used an exercise called “back to the screen” (see The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL for more information on how it works) with these types of videos.

Animal Planet is a great source for these kinds of videos.  They have a page where you can see their most-watched videos of “all time.”

You can see videos of “talking birds, water-skiing squirrels, and multi-talented dogs…”

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August 4, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Delicious Adds Features

Delicious, the popular “social bookmarking” tool, has just added some neat features. One is a page where you can see the most popular websites at any given moment.

I’m adding this new “Hot List” page to The Most Popular “Bookmarks” On The Web, which lists other ways to find similar information.

You can read a Tech Crunch post about this change and others on the Delicious site.

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August 4, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Most Popular Online Videos

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share a site called the Viral Video Chart.

It uses a variety of measuring instruments to determine the most popular videos for every 24 hours, 7 days, 30 days, and one year, and they do it in a variety of categories. It looks quite thorough.

Most, though not all, appear to be on YouTube.  You might also want to look at The Best Ways To Access Educational YouTube Videos At School.

Magma is a new site that isn’t open to the public yet, but is worth signing-up for to get an invitation.  Among other things, it shows you a continually updated listing of the most viewed videos on YouTube, Stumbleupon, Twitter, Delicious and a bunch more sites. In addition, you can collect your own lists of the ones you want to save.

Buzz Feed is another place to find what are supposedly the most popular videos on the Web. The selection appears to include some “raunchier” ones than the other sites I have listed in this post, but it does seem to have some other useful funny ones that could be used for activities with English Language Learners. I don’t know how they determine their selection — it’s obviously using a different methodology than the others.

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August 3, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

“Top 15 Most Popular Web 2.0 Websites”

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites or books that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites or books, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today I thought I’d share a list of the Top 15 Most Popular Web 2.0 Websites.

Actually, I’ll only list the top seven here, and suggest you go to the site of the people (eBizMBA) who put it together to see the rest of them (they did the work, after all).  They say they used  “a combination of Inbound Links, Alexa Rank, and U.S. traffic data from Compete and Quantcast” to come-up with the ranking. Here’s the link to the full list.

Here are the top seven:

1 | YouTube.com

2 | Wikipedia.org

3 | craigslist.org

4 | photobucket.com

5 | flickr.com

6 | WordPress.com

7 | twitter

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July 30, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

“Top 25 Most Popular Blogs”

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites or books that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites or books, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I thought I’d share a list of the Top 25 Most Popular Blogs on the Web.

Actually, I’ll only list the top ten here, and suggest you go to the site of the people (eBizMBA) who put it together to see the rest of them (they did the work, after all).  They say they used  “a combination of Inbound Links, Alexa Rank, and U.S. traffic data from Compete and Quantcast” to come-up with the ranking.  Here’s the link to the full list.

I don’t think you’ll see any surprises in this top ten. However, there seems to be some interesting ones between 11 and 15 — at least to me.

Here are the Top Ten:

1 | TMZ.com

2 | Gizmodo.com

3 | PerezHilton.com

4 | engadget.com

5 | boingboing.net

6 | TechCrunch.com

7 | LifeHacker.com

8 | Gawker.com

9 | FanHouse.com

10 | AutoBlog.com

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July 28, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Most Popular Websites For Kids”

I thought people might be interested in seeing a list of the most popular websites for kids:

10 Most Popular Websites for Kids

It comes from something called KIDO’Z, and lists what they claim are “top ten” sites most-visited by kids in English, Spanish, French, and Italian.

Read Write Web has a different list that’s about a year old focusing on the most popular sites for those under 12 in Great Britain.

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

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July 27, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Most Popular Fiction Authors Of All-Time

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites or books that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites or books, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I thought I’d share a list of the most popular fiction authors of all-time.

Wikipedia has an extensive list. You might find it interesting to see everybody they have listed, including the number of books sold and their genres. I thought I’d just list the top eleven here:

1. William Shakespeare

2. Agatha Christie

3. Barbara Cartland

4. Harold Robbins

5. Georges Simenon

6. Enid Blyton

7. Danielle Steel

8. Dr. Seuss

9. Gilbert Patten

10. Leo Tolstoy

11. J. K. Rowling

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July 20, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Most Popular “Bookmarks” Of All Time

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites or books that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

This is a simple, but interesting one.

If you’d like to find which links have been bookmarked on Delicious the most since the service began, go to Popacular and click on “All Time.”

At the time I was writing this post, the top nineteen were:

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July 19, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

The Most Popular Education Books

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites or books that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share two lists.

The first lists the top ten selling books on education, as identified by Amazon.  The list changes every hour, and it actually lists the top one hundred books in that category.  You can check them all out here, but I’ll just list the top ten in this post.

The second list shares my personal choices of the six books out of the one hundred that I’d highly recommend.  Feel free to leave your own picks from Amazon’s list in the comments section.  Or, add a book you’d recommend that isn’t on the list.

Here are Amazon’s top ten selling books — at the time of my writing this post:

1) Secrets of a Buccaneer-Scholar: How Self-Education and the Pursuit of Passion Can Lead to a Lifetime of Success

2) Three Cups of Tea: One Man’s Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time

3) Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know

4) The Secret

5) The Official SAT Study Guide, 2nd edition

6) The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 12th Edition

7) The Daily Five

8. Why Don’t Students Like School?: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom

9) A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose (Oprah’s Book Club, Selection 61)

10) Excuses Begone!: How to Change Lifelong, Self-Defeating Thinking Habits

Now here are my top six choices out of Amazon’s top one hundred (I’m listing them here in Amazon’s order, not in my order of preference):

2) Three Cups of Tea: One Man’s Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time

21) The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher

26) On Writing

41) Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It

68) Strategies That Work: Teaching Comprehension for Understanding and Engagement

72) Civil Disobedience

I’ll look forward to hearing what others have to say!

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July 14, 2009
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Most “Popular” ESL/EFL Sites Around The World

I’ve posted about the web tool highlighted in this post before, but thought I’d write about it again in the context of my “most popular” series.

As I’ve explained in earlier pieces, I periodically post “most popular” lists of websites that I think educators might find useful. Of course, there are a number of ways to gauge “popularity.” I just view these lists as opportunities to check-out some new sites, and find it interesting to see which ones might be particularly “popular.”

Today, I’d like to share a way to find the most “popular” ESL/EFL Sites around the world.

WebListy is a unique search engine. To quote The Make Use Of blog, “Weblisty lets you view the top… most trafficked websites in different countries for any topic.”

You type in your query, select the country, and click search.  The results include a screenshot as well as a text description.

I found it interesting to type in “ESL,” “EFL,” or “learn English” for various countries and see what came up.

You could certainly use it for other topics, too.

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