Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

June 25, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Junot Díaz Explains What Often Happens When We Confront Our Fears

The Terror is the headline of a column in today’s New York Times that’s written by author and professor Junot Díaz.

You’ll want to read the whole piece, which is very short.

Here’s an excerpt:

one-day-I-found-myself

I this his entire essay would be a good one for my students to read, followed by this writing prompt:

What is Professor Díaz saying about what fear does to us and how we should deal with it? Do you agree with him? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings.

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction, where you can find other prompts I use.

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June 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: A Corollary To The Best Piece Of Classroom Management Advice I’ve Heard

I’ve mentioned on more than one occasion the best piece of classroom management advice I’ve ever heard. It’s from Marvin Marshall, who wrote:

Will what I am about to do or say bring me closer or will it push me away farther from the person with whom I am communicating?

Here’s a corollary to it that appeared in The New York Times yesterday, and which was highlighted in a tweet by Dan Pink this morning:

In-every-interaction-you

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Classroom Management.

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June 21, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Carol Dweck On “Nagging”

Yesterday, I shared a number of reports about Carol Dweck’s talk over the weekend about the growth mindset concept.

Jill Berry shared an article about it in Schools Week headlined Carol Dweck says mindset is not ‘a tool to make children feel good.’

Here’s an excerpt:

Even-some-teachers-who

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

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June 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Communicate Vision By “Using Image Based Words”

I spend a lot of time working with my IB Theory of Knowledge students on the importance of illustrating each point they make, both in essays and in presentations, with stories. In fact, many highlight that fact in their end-of-year class evaluations as one of the most important things they have learned. You can see many of the resources I use to back-up my hammering on that concept at The Best Digital (& Non-Digital) Storytelling Resources (especially in the bottom-half).

Adam Grant shared an article this morning on Twitter that is a nice addition to that collection. It’s titled People Remember What You Say When You Paint a Picture.

Here’s an excerpt:

Messages-laced-with-data

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June 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Nicholas Kristof On “It’s Not Just About Bad Choices”

Nicholas Kristof has written a useful column in today’s New York Times that reviews some of the research that I’ve previously written about (see The Best Articles About The Study Showing Social Emotional Learning Isn’t Enough) related to poverty’s effect on “cognitive bandwidth.”

Here’s an excerpt:

Research-has-shown-that

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May 27, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Second Quote Of The Day: Why Teachers Stay (& Why They Leave)

Paul Barnwell has written a nice article for The Atlantic titled The Ongoing Struggle of Teacher Retention.

Here’s an excerpt:

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I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About The Importance Of Teacher (& Student) Working Conditions.

You might also be interested in my recent Ed Week Teacher series on the same topic.

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May 27, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: “Do” Is Better Than “Don’t”

I’ve previously written about how I apply research that shows using “positive-framed” messages instead of “loss-framed” ones.

Here’s an excerpt of what I’ve written earlier about researchers learning:

that “loss framed messages” (if you do this, then something bad will happen to you) really don’t have the “persuasive advantage” that they are thought to have. In fact, positive-framed messages (if you do this, all this good stuff will happen to you) are more effective, particularly in changing people’s health behaviors.

Researchers suggest the reason is because people “don’t like to be bullied into changing…behavior.” This is similar to the reason why incentives don’t work to increasing behavior that requires higher-order thinking — people don’t want to feel like mice in a maze (I heard that in a podcast interview with Daniel Pink a few months ago).

It certain reflects my experience with classroom management. I’ve had much better success talking with students about how changing their behavior will help them achieve their goals (passing a class, graduating from high school, going to college, etc.) than with threatening negative consequences (though, admittedly, in a few circumstances, that might work and I’ve used it).

A new study released today reinforced these same findings. Here’s an excerpt:

motivational-quotes_464338-1

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