Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 20, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Use This Interactive To Find Immigration’s Impact On The U.S. Economy

ProPublica has used a recent study on immigration and created a a very useful interactive called The Immigration Effect. With it, you can modify immigration policy and see it’s impact on the U.S. economy.

Here’s an excerpt from their article about the study:

I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning About Immigration In The United States.

July 18, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

The Best Resources On Developing A Sense Of Community In The Classroom

Several studies have been published over the past month related to the idea of how individual members of a group (co-workers, students) can do better cooperating in a supportive atmosphere than if everybody is working on their own.

I’ve published several posts about them and, as I’ve said in those posts, they go along with a push I made late in the last school year on “Everybody Is A Teacher.”

Here are links to those posts, along with some other related resources (I’ll be putting them all together into a lesson that I’ll share at a later date):

Bingo! There Are Issues With This Study On Grit & ELLs, But I Am Sure Going To Use It With My Students

“Everyone Is A Teacher” Is A New Engagement Strategy I’m Using & It Seems To Be Working

Intriguing Research On How To Increase Intrinsic Motivation

Focusing On The Impact Classroom Disruptions Have On Others, Not On The Students Doing The Disrupting

Here is an article I wrote for Education Week (which was later reprinted in The Washington Post) that includes an activity I do at the beginning of each school year to help students decide if they want to be a “classroom of students” or a “community of learners.”

Another related resource is The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The “Helper’s High.”

You might also be interested in The Best Resources On Students Having A “Purpose For Learning”

Feel free to make other suggestions….

July 17, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Bingo! There Are Issues With This Study On Grit & ELLs, But I Am Sure Going To Use It With My Students

Learning The Language over at Education Week has just posted about a new study on grit and English Language Learners.

Here’s an excerpt from their summary of the research:

The study itself, Individual Versus Peer Grit: Influence on Later Individual Literacy Achievement of Dual Language Learners, is NOT behind a paywall.

I have several concerns about the research, including issues about accurately measuring peer behavior on individual students (see the Brookings Report The problem with measuring effects of delinquent peers in education—and how to get around it and the fact that this study uses student self-report to make its determinations (see Brookings Report The Limitations of Self-Report Measures of Non-cognitive Skills).

Nevertheless, I will certainly be telling my English Language Learner students about the results of this study (along with saying, as I do most of the time that I share research summaries, that there’s not a guarantee of accuracy). Basically, it seems to me to mean that if everybody in the class works hard, then individual achievement increases more for everybody. Even people who would ordinarily work hard learn more if everybody else works hard, too.

Its conclusions support the big push I started late last year about how everyone’s actions not only affect themselves, but others (see “Everyone Is A Teacher” Is A New Engagement Strategy I’m Using & It Seems To Be Working).

In June, a study was published finding that thinking of our impact on others can have a major impact on strengthening our motivation to complete a task (see Intriguing Research On How To Increase Intrinsic Motivation).  That finding reinforces that effort, which I began in April.

And, just last week another study came out with the same theme related to classroom management (see Focusing On The Impact Classroom Disruptions Have On Others, Not On The Students Doing The Disrupting).

This new grit study is “icing on the cake.” I’m looking forward to putting it all together in one lesson for the fall. Of course, I will share what I do and its results in a future post.

I’m going to add this info to The Best Resources For Learning About The Importance Of “Grit”

July 14, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Focusing On The Impact Classroom Disruptions Have On Others, Not On The Students Doing The Disrupting

As many teachers already know, one of the most effective responses we can make to classroom management problems is by saying:

“I’m not feeling respected right now.”

Assuming you have good relationships with your students, I’m not really sure if there’s anything better we can say in the moment.

Of course, it’s also important for us to follow-up later with the main student or students who appeared to instigate the problem.

But what do we say to them?

The often-used phrase “Be curious, not furious” is a good guideline – asking the student(s) if they are doing okay, if anything is bothering them, that we’re surprised that they would do what they did, it didn’t make us feel respected, etc.

Today, I read about another idea to add into the mix.

When Kids Break Rules, Emphasize the Consequences for Others appeared in LifeHacker, and talks about research suggesting that instead of us telling students the consequences they might receive because of their behavior is much less effective than making them aware of the consequences their actions are having on others. As a headline in The Science of Us article summarizing the LifeHacker article says “Kids Listen Better When You Appeal to Their Sense of Morality.”

Here’s how the LifeHacker article puts it:

So, when I’m having that conversation with a student who had been disruptive, I should also add a comment like, “I’m sorry you’re having a hard day. Keep in mind, though, that when you act like that, you take away time from some of the other students who are interested in what we’re talking about. I wonder how fair that is to them.”

Just one more good piece of classroom management advice to keep in mind. You might also be interested in The Best Piece Of Classroom Management Advice I Ever Read.

This reminds me of some other recent research finding that thinking of our impact on others can have a major impact on strengthening our motivation to complete a task (see Intriguing Research On How To Increase Intrinsic Motivation).

I’m adding this info to Best Posts On Classroom Management and The Best Resources For Learning About Restorative Practices – Help Me Find More.

July 12, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Study Finds That Social Emotional Learning Has Long-Lasting Effects

A new meta-analysis has been released showing that student benefits from Social Emotional Learning can be long-lasting in several areas, including academic improvement.

You can access the entire study here (it’s not behind a paywall).

Here’s an excerpt from Education Week’s summary of the research:

Programs that teach emotional intelligence in schools have lasting impact is the headline of another report on the study.

I’m adding this info to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

July 11, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Study Finds Students Less Motivated In School The More They Think Wealth & Income Inequality Is Stacked Against Them

Academic motivation suffers when economic mobility seems out of reach is the headline of a Eureka Alert report.

Here’s an excerpt:

A draft of the study is not behind a paywall and can be accessed. It’s titled Perceptions of Socioeconomic Mobility Influence AcademicPersistence among Low Socioeconomic Status Students.

Unfortunately, the authors don’t really provide any viable suggestions on what educators can do about this challenge.

Here are my ideas:

One, of course, is for teachers to work politically to reduce some of these inequality barriers (see The Best Resources About Wealth & Income Inequality and A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More) and help our students develop the skills they need to effectively participate in public life (see The Best Websites For Learning About Civic Participation & Citizenship and The Best Posts & Articles On Building Influence & Creating Change).

Another thing we can do in the classroom is to create opportunities within our classroom to help students build a sense of agency (see The Best Resources On Student Agency & How To Encourage It).

Lastly, I’ve previously share this in The Best Resources For Showing Students Why They Should Continue Their Academic Career:

The Boston Globe has published a short report on a to-be-published study. The study found that:

Students whose career goals did not require education (e.g., sports star, movie star) spent less time on homework and got lower grades. The good news is that the researchers found it was easy to make education more salient, and thereby motivate kids. When students were shown a graph depicting the link between education and earnings, they were much more likely to hand in an extra-credit homework assignment the next day than if they were shown a graph depicting the earnings of superstars.

Here’s more information about that study.

July 7, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

New Study Finds That Punishment May Encourage The Behavior Being Targeted

In no surprise to teachers and parents everywhere, a new study finds that punishing someone for their behavior may actually result in an increase in the behavior that’s being targeted.

Science Daily published a summary of the study under the headline Motivation through punishment may not work.

Here’s an excerpt:

The experiment itself was a series of experiments where participants would get electric shocks by pressing on a particular key on a keyboard. The explanation is long and complicated. The paper is behind a paywall. I bought it, read it, and still don’t understand it.

I’m adding this info to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos Explaining Why Punishment Is Often Not The Best Classroom Strategy.

July 6, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Change “Employees” To “Students” & This Article Has Good Research & Advice On Building Trust

Want Your Employees to Trust You? Show You Trust Them is the headline of a new article in the Harvard Business Review.

Change the word “employees” to “students” and you’ll find a lot of good research about why trust is important in the classroom and good advice on how to build it.

Here’s an excerpt:

 

The article also includes seven good questions that teachers can ask themselves (again, just change “employees” to “students”:

Do I show my employees that I feel confident in their skills?

Do I show my employees that I care about their welfare?

Do I show my employees that I think they are capable of performing their jobs?

Do I give my employees influence over the things that affect them most on the job?

Do I give my employees the opportunity to take part in making job-related decisions that affect them?

Do I encourage my employees to take risks?

Do my words and deeds convey how much I trust my employees?

 

I’m adding this info to The Best Posts About Trust & Education.

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