Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

August 29, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Very Interesting Study: Students Seeing Teachers Drawing Diagrams Is Better Than Showing Pre-Made Ones

A new study found that students (primarily those with lower prior knowledge) learn much more when listening to teachers talk and draw diagrams than when teachers talked and showed pre-made ones.

I’ll reprint the abstract below. I think this is very interesting, and reflects my own experience. I know that writing things out takes extra class time, but it definitely seems to “click” more with students than when I just put something I already made on the overhead.

Here’s the abstract:

In 4 experiments, participants viewed a short video-based lesson about how the Doppler effect works. Some students viewed already-drawn diagrams while listening to a concurrent oral explanation, whereas other students listened to the same explanation while viewing the instructor actually draw the diagrams by hand. All students then completed retention and transfer tests on the material. Experiment 1 indicated that watching the instructor draw diagrams (by viewing the instructor’s full body) resulted in significantly better transfer test performance than viewing already-drawn diagrams for learners with low prior knowledge (d = 0.58), but not for learners with high prior knowledge (d = −0.24). In Experiment 2, participants who watched the instructor draw diagrams (by viewing only the instructor’s hand) significantly outperformed the control group on the transfer test, regardless of prior knowledge (d = 0.35). In Experiment 3, participants who watched diagrams being drawn but without actually viewing the instructor’s hand did not significantly outperform the control group on the transfer test (d = −0.16). Finally, in Experiment 4, participants who observed the instructor draw diagrams with only the instructor’s hand visible marginally outperformed those who observed the instructor draw diagrams with the instructor’s entire body visible (d = 0.36). Overall, this research suggests that observing the instructor draw diagrams promotes learning in part because it takes advantage of basic principles of multimedia learning, and that the presence of the instructor’s hand during drawing may provide an important social cue that motivates learners to make sense of the material. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)

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August 25, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Study Finds Value In Looking At Mistakes As Positive Learning Experiences

I’ve written and shared a lot about the importance of creating a classroom culture that, in the words of Carol Dweck,”celebrates mistakes” (see The Best Posts, Articles & Videos About Learning From Mistakes & Failures).

New research was unveiled today reinforcing the importance of this attitude.

Making a mistake can be rewarding, study finds is a report about it at Science Daily.

Here’s an excerpt:

Scientists-have-long

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August 22, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Research Study On Humility Perfect For Students (& Useful For All Of Us)

Humility Boosts Learning is a short report from The John Templeton Foundation. It describes a study that showed learning about a growth mindset encourages “intellectual humility,” and that increases student intrinsic motivation.

I was particularly struck by how they defined the term “intellectual humility” – basically as recognizing that you probably don’t know everything. It seems to me that this piece might be particularly useful in an IB Theory of Knowledge class when we discuss “knowledge.”

I also thought all of us could benefit from reviewing its short report and findings to reflect on our own attitudes.

Here’s an excerpt:

We-defined-intellectual

Thanks to Brainlogy for the tip.

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

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August 20, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Surprise, Surprise – Punishment May Not Be The Best Parenting (Or Teaching) Strategy

PertsLab shared a report on an interesting study with unsurprising results, Warmth, not punishment, helps middle-school students learn, U-M study says.

Though the study is focused on parenting, it’s easy to substitute the word “teaching.” It’s results are similar to two previous studies I’ve written about, Study: “Authoritative,” Not “Authoritarian,” Classroom Management Works Best For Boys.

Here’s an excerpt from the article about the new research:

Punitive-parenting

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos Explaining Why Punishment Is Often Not The Best Classroom Strategy.

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August 14, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Study: Remember A Couple of Past Instances Of Self-Control To Increase The Odds Of Repeating In Future

Scientists have found a new trick for completing your goals is an article in Quartz discussing a new study on self-control.

The research found having people just remember a couple of prior times they were successful at exhibiting self-control increased the chances of them being able to do so in the future. They found that people would get frustrated if they asked them to remember more than two, and they’d get discouraged if they were asked to remember their past self-control failures.

In the self-control lessons I’ve discussed in my books and here in my blog (see The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control), I always have students share on prior example of success. I also ask them to share one example of failure. I think the benefit of the laughter that comes from students sharing those stories outweighs any potential negative consequences that this study found.

But it is a good reinforcement to periodically invite students to remember a past instance when they were successful.

Here’s an excerpt from the study:

Research-published-in

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August 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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You Don’t Say! Researchers Find That It’s Easier To Learn Something New If You Can Connect It To Something Familiar

Just about every teacher is, or should be, familiar with all the research finding that it’s easier to learn something new when you can connect it to something old. For example, before we learn about Mardi Gras in New Orleans, I might ask students to quickly share about big celebrations they’ve experienced in their home countries.

I’ve written a number of previous posts about helping students connect their prior knowledge to new information.

But, I guess it never hurts to have additional research backing up our instructional strategies.

Eureka Alert brought news today of yet another study finding that this connecting of past to new does, indeed, work.

Here’s an excerpt:

If-everything-is-very

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August 12, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Studies Show, Unsurprisingly, That Stress Reduces Self-Control & Metacognition

In an unsurprising development, on recent study has found that experiencing stress reduces self-control and another research report found that stress has the same effect on metacognition.

These findings reinforce why it’s important to help our students develop strategies to cope with stress (see The Best Resources For Learning About Teens & Stress).

I’m adding this info to:

The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control

The Best Posts On Metacognition

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August 7, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Statistic Of The Day: How Long Does It Take To Learn English?

How Long Does It Take ELLs to Develop English Proficiency? is an Ed Week post about a new study done with ELL elementary schoolchildren in Washington.

Here’s what they found:

On-average-it-took-the

However, the next sentence also adds:

But over the course of the study, almost 20 percent of students did not score high enough on the state exam to be reclassified.

This study’s results seem to confirm other previous research (I wonder why resources have to be spent on something that has already been found to be true already?). Here’s the consensus from the field:

…researchers have developed a range. They estimate that it can take up to three to five years to achieve oral proficiency — the type of language children need to engage in everyday interactions — and four to seven years to be at the same academic level as their native English speaking peers, which includes reading and writing across subject areas.

That same past research suggests that it is easier to learn a new language prior to age nine because of the brain development process. So that provides an explanation for why the Washington study is at the low-end of that range.

I’m adding this post to The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current ELL/ESL/EFL News & Research.

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