Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 18, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: I Think This Is The Best Article Carol Dweck Has Written

The Secret to Raising Smart Kids is an article by Carol Dweck in this month’s Scientific American, and I think it’s the best shorter piece sharing her work and perspective that I’ve seen.

I can’t think of anything better to share with a colleague who may be unfamiliar with her work.

Here’s a short excerpt, though it won’t be new to anyone who knows her writings:

I-developed-a-broader

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students and to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset.”

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January 14, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Study Finds That Bilingualism Supports A Growth Mindset

Bilingualism changes children’s beliefs is the headline of an article in Science Daily about a new study that I think is very, very interesting — and it makes sense.

The study basically found that learning another language promotes the belief that more things can be learned and fewer abilities are innate — a key tenet of a growth mindset.

Here’s an excerpt:

The-study-forthcoming-in

I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Helping Our Students Develop A “Growth Mindset” and to The Best Resources For Learning The Advantages To Being Bilingual Or Multilingual.

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January 13, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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No, The “Cone Of Experience” Is Not “Research-Based” & Yes, Some People Debunking It Have Way Too Much Time On Their Hands

We’ve all heard about or seen the perspective of the so-called “Dale’s Cone of Experience” that says:

“We learn 10% of what we read, 20% of what we hear, 30% of what we see, 50% of what we see and hear, 70% of what we say or write…..[and] 90% of what we teach.”

I had originally heard that it was developed by William Glasser, but then learned from his organization that, though he had described it as an accurate reflection of his own experience and sometimes described it as such, he did not originate it nor would he vouch for specific research backing it up.

A few years ago, while searching online, I discovered that, in fact, there wasn’t research specifically supporting those percentages.

Now, a group of people who have apparently been making a major effort over the years to point this fact out have written four articles documenting how they say it’s been misused over the years.

Yawn

I’m sure they’re right about the inaccuracy of the specific percentages, and I agree we should throw out the Cone. But there is an enormous quantity of research that supports the idea that constructivism is substantially more effective than lecture or direct instruction for student learning. Here are links that research:

The Best Posts Questioning If Direct Instruction Is “Clearly Superior”

The Best Research Demonstrating That Lectures Are Not The Best Instructional Strategy

“What I Cannot Create, I Do Not Understand”

Important Study: “Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall”

So, sure, spend a little time stomping on the Cone if you feel like it. But spend a whole lot more time conveying and acting on its research-supported main message — that “learning by doing” is the way to go…

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January 9, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Video: PBS News Hour Shows A Second Excellent Segment On Self-Control

Marshmallows from Flickr via Wylio

© 2007 rjp, Flickr | CC-BY | via Wylio

Three years ago, the PBS News Hour did an excellent segment on self-control (I originally posted about it at Here’s A Video On Self-Control I’m Showing My Students First Thing Next Week and it’s also the second video embedded in this post).

Last night, the did another very good one, focusing on the Marshmallow Test. It’s the first video embedded in this post, and you can see the transcript here.

My only critique of it is a line that is always infuriating to me when people talk about charter schools. The segment mentions that the KIPP school students are selected by lottery and suggests that makes them comparable to students in other public schools. However, it doesn’t mention the fact that families who are particularly invested in their children’s education are ones who would go through the effort of registering and participating in a lottery, which makes blanket comparisons to students in other schools invalid. Of course, I also have other concerns about KIPP’s “character education” program.

Nevertheless, it’s a very good segment that I’ll be showing in class. I’m adding this post to The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control.

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January 8, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Statistic Of The Day: New Scholastic Study On Reading

Study Finds Reading to Children of All Ages Grooms Them to Read More on Their Own is a New York Times article about a new study from Scholastic that found reading is down among children.

Here’s an excerpt:

There-were-some

I’m adding this post to The Best Resources Documenting The Effectiveness of Free Voluntary Reading.

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January 4, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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New Study Finds Value In Social Emotional Learning

Why Schools Should Pay More Attention To Students’ Grit And Self-Control is the headline of a recent Huffington Post article about a new study released by the National Bureau of Economic Research. It supports Social Emotional Learning (SEL).

Here’s an excerpt:

researchers-noted-that

I’m adding this post to The Best Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Resources.

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January 4, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Study Suggests It’s Time To Put Up Pictures Of Mountains On My Classroom Wall

Keep Impulses in Check By Looking at Nature is the headline of an article in The Scientific American. It reports on a recent study about self-control.

Here’s an excerpt:

Before-and-during-the

The article goes on to explain:

Follow-up experiments revealed that seeing nature makes us think more about the future, says the study’s lead author Meredith S. Berry, a psychologist now at the University of Montana. “When time is expanded, it is easier for people to imagine the future, and this effect appears to lessen the draw of immediate temptations.”

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts About Helping Students Develop Their Capacity For Self-Control.

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December 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: “Temporal Landmarks” & Goal-Setting

How to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions is a useful article over at Bloomberg View about research related to New Year’s resolutions.

Here’s an excerpt:

Dai-and-his-coauthors

Obviously, this can be connected to quarters and semesters in a school year, too.

I’m adding this post to The Best Ways To Help Make Your New Year’s Resolutions Succeed and to The Best Posts On Students Setting Goals.

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