Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

December 21, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On Education Policy In 2014 – Part Two):

Are you a truly bad teacher? Here’s how to tell. appeared in The Washington Post.

When Charter Schools Are Non-Profit in Name Only is from The Pacific Standard. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

Restoring Shanker’s Vision for Charter Schools is from The American Educator. I’m adding it to the same list.

Why Teacher Voice Matters is from The American Educator. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About The Importance Of Teacher (& Student) Working Conditions.

Want to Close the Achievement Gap? Close The Teaching Gap is by Linda Darling-Hammond. I’m adding it to the same list.

New York City Teachers Score Highly Under New Evaluation System is from The New York Times. School reformers, though, don’t want to be confused by the facts, as you can read at John Thompson’s Reject Cuomo’s Common Core Duplicity.

The Obama Administration brings their obsessive mantra of accountability to colleges: read The Fate Of The Administration’s College Ratings from NPR ; Critics say college graduation rates don’t tell the whole story from The Los Angeles Times; and College ratings draft light on details from Politico.

A tremendous number of school children in America still live in poverty is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher (& Outside Factors) Have On Student Achievement.

Teacher Team Offers New Vision of Responsibility is from Living In Dialogue. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

Does Money Matter? Is School Funding Fair? is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning That Money Does Matter For Schools.

In How Congress can address over-testing without overreaching, Michael Petrilli suggests that schools continue to use standardized tests — at a reduced level, but just not use them for teacher evaluation. Instead:

use everything but test scores, such as principal or peer or expert observations, parent surveys, and maybe even kid surveys.

I’m not a big fan of standardized tests (see My Best Posts On How To Prepare For Standardized Tests (And Why They’re Bad) ) and I think there are better alternatives (The Best Articles Describing Alternatives To High-Stakes Testing — Help Me Find More) . But I’m also a realist, and I think his proposal would be a decent deal.

Bridging the Naughty-Nice Divide in Education Debates is a very thoughtful post by Marilyn Anderson Rhames. Her advice on respectful participation in the school reform rhetorical wars make a lot of sense, and it would be good if many writers/bloggers heeded it. However, those who are actively involved “on the ground” in organizing campaigns probably want to not follow it to the letter. I explain why in other posts at The Best Posts & Articles On Building Influence & Creating Change.

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December 17, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Great News! Only 2 Of Top 308 New Economists Want To Study Schools

I’ve written a fair amount about the damage some economists have wrought on schools (see The Best Posts & Articles About The Role Of Economists In Education).

Five Thirty Eight just wrote a post
finding that out of 308 new economists graduating from the “top” fifteen economics schools, only two are planning to study education. That’s the least amount out of any other field. I’ve embedded the chart below.

It seems to me that can only be good news for us teachers, our students, and their families.

What do you think?

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December 16, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Education “Year-In-Review” Round-Ups For 2014

In what has become a tradition, my “Best and Worst Education News” of the year will be appearing soon in The Washington Post (you can see my mid-year edition here, and previous year’s round-ups here).

I’m putting the finishing touches on my piece, so let me know if you think there’s a big story that might not be on my radar.

But I’m not the only doing these kinds of education “year-in-review” posts.

Here are a few others, and I hope readers will share more in the comments section:

2014’s Best and Worst Players in Public Education is from NEA Today.

Five big education stories in 2014 is from Scholastic.

Top Ed-Tech Trends 2014 is by Audrey Watters.

The 5 Biggest Education Stories of 2014 is from NEA Today.

I’m adding this post to All My 2014 “Best” Lists — So Far — In One Place.

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December 14, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Articles, Posts & Videos On Education Policy In 2014 – Part Two

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It’s time for another of my annual end-of-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,400 “The Best…” lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far


The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) On Education Policy In One Place

All My 2012 “The Best…” Lists On Education Policy In One Place

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Polcy In 2011 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – Part Two (let me know what you think I’m missing):

The Los Angeles Times just published a great article headlined, Can collaboration between schools, unions fix failing campuses?

I Used to Think … That Experts Understood the World is by Rick Hess at Ed Week and he followed that post up with Wait A Minute...

Returns to Teacher Experience: Student Achievement and Motivation in Middle School is the title of a new study at The National Center For Analysis Of Longitudinal Data In Education Research.

How to reframe the education reform debate appeared in The Washington Post.

Teachers Are Not Superhuman is by Walt Gardner at Ed Week.

Gates Scholar, Tom Kane, Continues the Fight to Prove He Is Right is by John Thompson.

Teacher Evaluations Need to ‘Support, Not Sort’ was one of my posts at Education Week Teacher.  In Part One of a three-part series, American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, California Teachers Association President Dean Vogel, and 2012 National Teacher Of The Year Rebecca Mieliwocki shared their thoughts on teacher evaluations.

What Education “Reformers” Do Not Understand About Teaching and Learning is by Daniel Katz.

Here’s an excellent video of Dana Goldstein discussing “As if teachers’ jobs aren’t hard enough, they’re asked to fix poverty, too”:

‘The Teacher Wars’: An Interview With Dana Goldstein is another one of my posts at Education Week Teacher.

The Original Charter School Vision is an excellent Op-Ed in The New York Times, written by Richard D. Kahlenberg and Halley Potter.

Education Is Not ‘Moneyball’: Why Teachers Can’t Trust Value-Added Evaluations Yet is an excellent Ed Week piece by William Eger.

For Reformers: An Important Paper on Worker Compensation and Incentives is by Paul Bruno, and is a very important piece.

The Teach Like a Champion Paradigm is a very interesting post about Doug Lemov’s methods. It’s by Ben Spielberg.

Seven things teachers are sick of hearing from school reformers appeared in the Washington Post.

Teaching Is Not a Business is the title of David Kirp’s op-ed in The New York Times .

Educational Movements, Not Market Moments is an important post by Mike Rose.

Gary Ravani has written a great post that appeared in The Washington Post titled School reforms that actually work.

“Stupid, absurd, non-defensible”: New NEA president Lily Eskelsen García on the problem with Arne Duncan, standardized tests and the war on teachers is from Salon.

The New York Times published a column that highlights all of what is wrong about merit pay. However, they talk about it in the context of doctors and the medical profession and not teachers. It’s titled The Problem With ‘Pay for Performance’ in Medicine.

Do Students Learn More When Their Teachers Work Together? is an excellent post by Esther Quintero at The Shanker Blog.

The New Yorker, two months after publishing an excellent article on the school reform fiasco in Newark which made The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far list)  published an extraordinary feature on the Atlanta testing scandal — Wrong Answer: In an era of high-stakes testing, a struggling school made a shocking choice — by Rachel Aviv.

Lily Eskelen Garcia, the National Education Association President spoke at the American Federation Of Teachers Convention.

It’s definitely worth watching:

Donna Brazile announced the formation of Democrats For Public Education at the American Federation of Teachers Convention in Los Angeles. It’s designed to support effective and teacher-supported education efforts.

You’ve got to watch this video of her speech at the Convention:

The Best Resources For Understanding “Personalized Learning”

Gates’ Excuse for Poor Results of Educational Technology: “Unmotivated Students” and A Question for Bill Gates: How Can We Motivate Students When Their Futures Are Bleak? are both by Anthony Cody at Ed Week.

We Need Teachers of Color is from Education Week.

The Best Resources For Learning About Balanced Literacy & The “Reading Wars”

Ten Reform Claims That Teachers Should Know How to Challenge is by Jack Schneider at Ed Week.

America’s Unspoken Education Issue: Black Kids Need Black Teachers is by Melinda Anderson.

When Educators Understand Race and Racism is by Melinda D. Anderson.

Accountability vs. What We Want for Our Children is an excellent post at Education Week. It’s written by Marc Tucker at his Top Performers blog.

Pedro Noguera Defends Teacher Tenure in Wall Street Journal is from Diane Ravitch’s blog.

There Is Probably No “Crisis” In American Education is by Paul Bruno.

How Bill Gates pulled off the swift Common Core revolution is from The Washington Post.

The Best Posts & Articles About OECD’s Survey Of Teacher Working Conditions

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December 14, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy

Here are some recent posts and articles on education policy issues that I thought were worth sharing:

Charter Schools’ Arbitrary Rules Can Have Dire Consequences is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

If teachers know best about professional learning… let’s follow their lead. is by Barnett Berry. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers.

Charts: Common Core Implementation By The Numbers is from This Week In Education. I’m adding it to A Collection Of My “Best” Lists On The Common Core.

How L.A. Unified got its iPad contract is from The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

What Students Do (And Don’t Do) In Khan Academy is by Dan Meyer. I’m adding it to The Best Posts About The Khan Academy.

Big Drop In Students Being Held Back, But Why? is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Grade Retention, Social Promotion & Alternatives To Both.

Burdensome, restrictive, flawed: Why proposed federal regulations for teacher preparation programs are a cause for concern is from The Hechinger Report.

Obama’s Race to the Top loses all funding in 2015 omnibus spending bill is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Race To The Top.”

F.C.C. Increases Money for E-Rate Program for Internet in Schools and Libraries is from The NY Times.

Did Rudy Giuliani just link Eric Garner’s death to teachers’ unions? is from The Washington Post.

Another Educated Guess about Philanthropy and School Reform is by Larry Cuban. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

An Educated Guess about Donor-Driven School Reform is also by Larry Cuban. I’m adding to the same list.

Teacher Pay Is Poorly Understood is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About The Importance Of Teacher (& Student) Working Conditions.

Is Teaching More Like Baseball Or Basketball? is from The Shanker Blog.

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December 8, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Wash Post: “single most important factor in helping children learn is the quality of their teachers” – WRONG!

The Washington Post began an editorial yesterday supporting the Obama Administration’s misguided attempt to “reform” teacher prep programs with a blatantly false statement:

“RESEARCH HAS shown that the single most important factor in helping children learn is the quality of their teachers.”

Actually, all research has shown that factors outside a teacher’s control influence between two-thirds and ninety percent of a student’s academic performance.

You can read about that research at The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher & Outside Factors Have On Student Achievement.

The editorial is just another of what I described in yesterday’s post on Scapegoating Teachers.

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December 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Scapegoating Teachers

As most educators know, a fair amount of media and many “school reformers” often try to use teachers as scapegoats for challenges facing our schools and students — instead of focusing on providing adequate funding (The Best Sites For Learning That Money Does Matter For Schools
)and dealing with the many outside school influences that affect academic performance (The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher (& Outside Factors) Have On Student Achievement).

The infamous recent TIME cover is just one of the latest examples of blaming teachers.

However, state after state that has been implementing teacher evaluation changes have been finding that only three percent of their educators have been “ineffective.” Florida is the latest, and it follows Rhode Island, Maryland and others.

The question is — will school reformers continue to have an attitude of “don’t confuse me with the facts” or will they begin to focus on the major problems facing schools, our students and their families?

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December 5, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

Here are some recent important posts and articles on educational policy issues:

Teach For America At 25: With Maturity, New Pressure To Change is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Raising Concerns About Teach For America.

High School Graduation Rates Are at an All-Time High, Especially for Latino Students is from The National Journal. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Pointing Out That Our Schools Are Not Failing.

How can we improve the way we assess teachers? is from The Guardian. I believe this is the report it discusses. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

Principals reject ‘value-added’ assessment that links test scores to educators’ jobs is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation.

A System Entirely Composed of Charters? is from Ed Week, as is If Charters Work, What Is the Reason? I’m adding them both to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

Responding to the Federal Department of Education’s Proposal to Rank Teacher Education Programs: “Thoughts on Educating Teachers When Teacher Education Is Under Attack” is from Mike Rose.

5 surprising things everyone should know about standardized tests is from Vox. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On How To Prepare For Standardized Tests (And Why They’re Bad).

Lessons of nope: Joel Klein fails to educate us on how to fix our schools is from The Hechinger Report.

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December 4, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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My New BAM! Radio Show Features An Innovative Strategy For Teacher Evaluation

teacherevaluation

Can We Evaluate Teachers Based on Factors Teachers Completely Control? is the title of my latest BAM! Radio Show.

It’s a ten-minute conversation I had with Ben Spielberg and Ted Appel, the principal of the school where I teach. Our talk focuses on the idea of measuring inputs — in other words, identifying what practices we know make up good teaching and evaluating educators on whether they are implementing those practices.

This show is a follow-up to my Education Week Teacher post, Using Teacher Evaluations ‘to Promote Growth.’

You can read more about this idea here and here.

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December 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Wow! The Evaluation Plan For New York’s Universal Pre-K Program Sounds Impressive

Readers might be familiar with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s efforts to create a universal pre-k program in that city.

Five Thirty-Eight has now published a fascinating piece describing the process that will be used to evaluate it and, boy, does it sound thoughtful and impressive. I know words are cheap, and who knows if it will happen the way it’s described, but it will be interesting to see.

Now, why can’t districts use a similarly thorough and reflective process for schools and teachers instead of something as ridiculous as Value Added Measurements?

You might also be interested in The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

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December 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
2 Comments

Two Interesting PBS Videos On Innovation In Philadelphia Schools

(I’ve now added some comments from Chris Lehman, the principal of the Science Leadership Academy)

The PBS News Hour has aired two interesting segments on innovative schools in Philadelphia.

A few intriguing takeaways:

* It sounds like some great teaching and learning is going on in the two schools featured.

* I was surprised to learn that the Science Leadership Academy “rejects nine out of every ten applicants.” Along with exceptional administrators and teachers there — who I respect a lot — that kind of exclusivity does create a lot of possibilities that might not be as readily available in other schools.

* The second segment discusses an admissions policy in another school that it says is open to everyone. I’d be interested in hearing from people more familiar with the situation there to see how open it actually is — in other words, might there be other barriers to any student attending there, like its distance away from certain neighborhoods.

These comments are not meant to take away from any of the exceptional work going on at those schools. I just wondered if the segments might have downplayed some of the challenges of doing those creative projects in challenging environments found at many schools that do indeed take-in any and all students. I’d also be interested in hearing if those two schools receive additional resources — public or private — that are not available to other schools.

Please let me know what you think and what you know — I’d love to hear other views and learn from them! I’m very open to publishing responses from Philadelphia educators in a follow-up post.

Here are comments that Chris Lehman, the founding principal of the Science Leadership Academy, has now contributed (if I had been a little more  patient, I would have waited for his responses before publishing this post):

It’s why we started a second school… because we did not want to be built on exclusivity – and before we started SLA@Beeber, it was getting far too hard to get into SLA.

We did 1100 interviews last year for 250 seats for two campuses. We made around 400-450 offers (I don’t remember exactly off-hand) for those 250 seats, which makes us far less exclusive than the report suggested.

No extra money from SDP. We hustle and raise money with things like EduCon and our Dell partnership, but actually, SLA receives less per pupil than neighborhood schools because of Title I, etc…

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December 2, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Other Shoe Drops: FBI Seizes Documents Related To L.A. Schools iPad Fiasco

It looks like former Superintendent of Los Angeles schools John Deasy might have some explaining to do…to the FBI and to a federal Grand Jury.

Less than two months after his abrupt resignation (see LA Superintendent Expected To Resign On Thursday — And Does!), the FBI has seized twenty boxes of documents related to his iPad fiasco and a federal grand jury has begun investigating it.

You can read about it at these articles that appeared earlier today:

Federal grand jury subpoenaed documents from L.A. Unified is from the Los Angeles Times.

LAUSD iPads: Federal grand jury probes after FBI seizes documents is from Public Radio.

Federal probe into LA Unified procurement a first, says lawyer is from LA School Report.

You might also be interested in A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

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November 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Very Interesting Feature At USA Today On School Diversity

diversity

Greg Toppo at USA Today has published a very interesting feature at USA Today titled Diversity In The Classroom.

Most of the narrative focuses on schools in Minnesota, but it also includes a great deal of information on schools nationwide. In particular, it has an interactive tool where you can track the diversity of any give school in the United States over a twenty year period. The image at the top of this post shows the data from the school where I teach.

The article uses something called the “Diversity Index,” which measures:

….on a scale of 0 to 100, the chance that two randomly chosen students come from the same racial group. In the 2011 school year, it ranged from 74 for public students in Hawaii (very diverse) to 15 in Maine and Vermont.

I’m adding this to A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism.

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November 29, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy

Here are a few recent useful posts and articles on education policy issues. It’s a shorter list than usual since many took part of this Thanksgiving week off and wrote less:

How principals can avoid ‘administrator-itis’ is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Being A Teacherpreneur.

A dozen questions for school reformers who say one thing and do another is by Anthony Cody.

I Used to Think … That Experts Understood the World is by Rick Hess at Ed Week and he followed that post up with Wait A Minute...

Missouri tries alternatives to repeating grades is from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Grade Retention, Social Promotion & Alternatives To Both.

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November 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Quote Of The Day: Teacher Experience Matters

Returns to Teacher Experience: Student Achievement and Motivation in Middle School is the title of a new study at The National Center For Analysis Of Longitudinal Data In Education Research.

Here’s an excerpt:

We-find-clear-returns-to

I’m adding this info to The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Both Why Teacher Tenure Is Important & The Reasons Behind Seniority-Based Layoffs.

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November 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles About Ed Policy

Here are some recent useful articles and posts about education policy issues:

Poor youths found to get less learning time in school than rich is from The San Francisco Chronicle.

Under half of students projected to test well is from Ed Source. Here’s how it begins:

Between a third and 44 percent of students in California and 16 other states taking the same test next spring on the Common Core standards are expected to score at grade level in math and reading, according to projections released Monday by the creator of the states’ tests.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

Cutoff Scores Set for Common-Core Tests is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to the same list.

How to reframe the education reform debate appeared in The Washington Post.

Teachers Are Not Superhuman is by Walt Gardner at Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

New York Chancellor Is Criticized for Remarks on Charters is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to the same list.

The painful backlash against ‘no-excuses’ school discipline is from The Hechinger Report. It’s going on the same list, too.

Guess the percentage of cable news education guests who are actually educators is from The Washington Post. Here’s how it begins:

Can you guess the percent of evening cable news guests who are brought on camera to discuss education issues who are actually educators? Well, someone did the math and came up with this: Nine percent. Yes, 9 percent.

Pearson Foundation closing (after paying big fines for helping corporate parent) is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

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November 15, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Useful Posts & Articles About Ed Policy

Here are a few recent useful posts and articles about education policy issues:

The Two Biggest Mistakes in the Common Core Standards is by Grant Wiggins. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Sharing Concerns About Common Core Standards.

Punitive Schooling is a pretty interesting piece that appeared in Jacobin.

Even though I thought, and had hopes, earlier this week that the Obama Administration might be having second thoughts about its approach to teacher evaluations (see Did The Obama Administration Signal A Major Shift In Teacher Evaluation Policies Today?), its renewal guidance to states for No Child Left Behind waivers does not seem to continue that change.

In Defense Of Calling It “Corporate Reform” by John Thompson is an excellent post.

A Botched Study Raises Bigger Questions is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation.

Gates Scholar, Tom Kane, Continues the Fight to Prove He Is Right is by John Thompson. I’m adding it to the same list.

A Surge in U.S. High School Graduation Rates is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Pointing Out That Our Schools Are Not Failing.

Demystifying the MOOC is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On MOOC’s.

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November 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
4 Comments

Did The Obama Administration Signal A Major Shift In Teacher Evaluation Policies Today?

Today, the Obama Administration issued new requirements pushing for an equal distribution of “excellent” teachers across all schools in all districts. How did they define an “excellent” teacher? They left a lot of room for states to make that determination, but did say what an excellent teacher is not:

Department officials also indicated what is not “excellent,” including educators in their first year of teaching, those without certification or licensure and those who are absent from class more than 10 days in a school year.

In other words, as Education Week put it:

the Obama administration directs states to focus their plans mainly on “inputs”—such as how many years of experience a teacher has—rather than “outputs,” or how effective teachers actually are at moving the needle on student achievement.

This issue of “input” versus “output” is a topic that the principal of our school, Ted Appel, and I have been discussing for quite awhile. And Ben Spielberg wrote what I think is one of the best pieces on teacher evaluation that anyone has written precisely about it (see This Is One Of The Best Pieces I’ve Read On Teacher Evaluation: “The Problem with Outcome-Oriented Evaluations”).

He described the value of evaluating inputs, as opposed to outputs. In other words, most teacher evaluation discussion is focused on measuring student outcomes. But, as Ben points out, we often have far less control over those outcomes than is believed.

I’m wondering if these new guidelines from the Administration might signal a first move towards recognizing this reality and away from blind adherence to the use of harmful methods like Value-Added Measures?

What do you think? Am I reading too much into today’s announcement?

By the way, if you’d like to read more about what Ben and others have to say about teacher evaluations, I’ve just posted the third post in my Ed Week series on the topic.

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November 9, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles on Ed Policy