Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 22, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far):

Teachers With Student Debt: The Struggle, The Causes And What Comes Next is from NPR.

‘Personalized Learning’ and the Power of the Gates Foundation to Shape Education Policy is from Audrey Watters. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Beyond scraped knees: The implications of a Missouri playground on state voucher programs is from Brookings. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why School Vouchers Are A Bad Idea (& Other Commentaries On “Choice”).

Trump Administration Advances School Vouchers Despite Scant Evidence is from Scientific American. I’m adding it to the same list.

Former L.A. Unified teacher Rafe Esquith can continue with his lawsuit, judge rules is from The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On The Rafe Esquith Controversy.

Chicago Will Hold Diplomas Hostage Unless Teens Can Prove They Have Plans After High School is by Andre Perry.

For School Improvement, Demographics Aren’t Destiny is from Ed Week.

Teacher Tests Test Teachers is from The American Prospect. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation.

July 16, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources On The Idea Of Evaluating Teacher “Input” Instead Of Student “Output”

I’ve shared a lot about teacher evaluations, including:

The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments

The Best Resources For Learning About The “Value-Added” Approach Towards Teacher Evaluation

The Best Resources On Peer Assistance & Review (PAR) Programs

I’ve also shared a few posts on the idea of looking at teacher “input” instead of student “output” when considering what strategies to look at for teacher evaluations, and I thought it would be worth bringing them together in a “Best” list.

The idea is that we teachers may very well have less control over student outcomes that is believed.

Here are the resources worth reviewing on the idea:

This Is One Of The Best Pieces I’ve Read On Teacher Evaluation: “The Problem with Outcome-Oriented Evaluations” is my post about a great piece Ben Spielberg wrote about the topic.

Ben talked more about it in my Education Week Teacher column, Using Teacher Evaluations ‘to Promote Growth.’

Can We Evaluate Teachers Based on Factors Teachers Completely Control? is the title of one of my BAM! Radio Shows. It’s a ten-minute conversation I had with Ben Spielberg and Ted Appel, the principal of the school where I teach. Our talk focuses on the idea of measuring inputs — in other words, identifying what practices we know make up good teaching and evaluating educators on whether they are implementing those practices.

Seven Fallacies about Teaching is by Jack Marwood.

Did The Obama Administration Signal A Major Shift In Teacher Evaluation Policies Today?

Let me know if you have other suggestions for posts to add to this list….

July 15, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far):

Arizona’s Ethnic Studies Ban In Public Schools Goes To Trial is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On The Value Of Ethnic Studies Classes – Help Me Find More.

Author shelves teacher tenure bill; surprise alternative emerges is from Ed Source and is about some interesting stuff going on in the California legislature. You might also be interested in The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Why Teacher Tenure Is Important.

How Does Professional Development Improve Teaching? seems like a pretty important paper. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers — Help Me Find More.

Chicago won’t allow high school students to graduate without a plan for the future is from The Washington Post.

How health care bill could hurt a program beloved in Trump country is from Politico. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How Repeal Of Obamacare Will Affect Students & Schools.

Here’s a new paper that says:

We used regression discontinuity techniques and data on a census of the students, teachers, and schools in a large urban minority-majority school district to show receipt of a financial award did not consistently relate to higher mean student test score gains or teachers’ likelihood of retention.

I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why Teacher Merit Pay Is A Bad Idea.

July 10, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

Chart: It Doesn’t Look Like Teachers’ Jobs Are At Risk Of Being Automated

Bloomberg has just published an intriguing interactive chart showing the risks of different jobs being automated in the coming decades.

It can’t get much lower-risk than for high school teachers – you can see their report on the screenshot at the top of this post.

However, elementary teachers are even less at risk:

So even though a few extreme ed tech enthusiasts might be thinking that we can be replaced by robots, it looks like they should be betting on it happening….

July 9, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far):

18 States Sue Betsy DeVos And Education Dept. Over Delay Of Borrower Defense Rule is from NPR.

Reform Lessons from Skeptical But Not Cynical Veterans is by Larry Cuban. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On Building Influence & Creating Change.

DeVos’s Hard Line on New Education Law Surprises States is from The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Our New U.S. Secretary of Education.

Teacher Coaching: What We Know is from The World Bank. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On “Instructional Coaching”

Some KIPP Houston schools charged unallowable fees, agency finds is from The Houston Chronicle. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

Medicaid’s vital role for children in Trump country is from The L.A. Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How Repeal Of Obamacare Will Affect Students & Schools.

July 3, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Wrong-Headed Criticism Of Medicaid Mirrors Wrong-Headed Criticism Of Schools

Critics of Medicaid, including, incredibly, the head of the agency that administers it, say that studies show that people with Medicaid fare no better than being uninsured. Therefore, there will be few problems with reducing access to it.

Today, The New York Times published an excellent critique of that thinking, Medicaid Worsens Your Health? That’s a Classic Misinterpretation of Research.

I’ll publish a few short excerpts. While you’re reading it, I think it’s easy to find some parallels with critiques that are sometimes made of many of our schools:

Our examination of research in this field suggests this kind of thinking is based on a classic misunderstanding: confusing correlation for causation. It’s relatively easy to conduct and publish research that shows that Medicaid enrollees have worse health care outcomes than those with private coverage or even with no coverage…..

…But that is not a proper interpretation of such studies. There are many other, more plausible explanations for the findings. Medicaid enrollees are of lower socioeconomic status — even lower than the uninsured as a group — and so may have fewer community and family resources that promote good health. They also tend to be sicker than other patients. In fact, some health care providers help the sickest and the neediest to enroll in Medicaid when they have no other option for coverage. Because people can sign up for Medicaid retroactively, becoming ill often leads to Medicaid enrollment, not the opposite.

 

You might also be interested in:

The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research

The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher (& Outside Factors) Have On Student Achievement

The Best Online Resources For Teaching The Difference Between Correlation & Causation

The Best Resources For Learning How Repeal Of Obamacare Will Affect Students & Schools

The Best Articles Highlighting Parallel Critiques Of Increasing School & Health Care “Efficiency”

July 1, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far):

Can a Tech Start-Up Successfully Educate Children in the Developing World? is the “must-read” article of the week, appearing in The New York Times. It’s a deep dive into a for-profit effort to create schools in Africa.

Springtime for Union Busting? is from The Nation. I’m adding it to The Best Resources On The Awful Friedrichs Case.

Chan-Zuckerberg to Push Ambitious New Vision for Personalized Learning is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Is Big Philanthropy Compatible With Democracy? is from The Atlantic. I’m adding it to the same list.

GOP health-care bill could cut funds schools use to help special-ed students is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How Repeal Of Obamacare Will Affect Students & Schools.

Supreme Court Rules Religious School Can Use Taxpayer Funds For Playground is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why School Vouchers Are A Bad Idea (& Other Commentaries On “Choice”).

Okay, this next item I’m going to share could be weird, great or something in the middle.

I’ve got some mixed feelings about Laurene Powell Jobs’ initiative to “reinvent” high schools (see The Best Articles For Learning About Laurene Powell Jobs’ Project To Redesign High Schools), but I’m trying to keep an open mind.  Here’s their next project:

On Friday, September 8th at 8/7 pm central, all four broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, FOX & NBC) – as part of a partnership between XQ and the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF) – will dedicate an hour of programming to EIF Presents: XQ Super School Live, a major national television event.  The broadcast is designed to inspire and equip everyone in the country to join us in reshaping high school – so it prepares every American student to thrive in the 21st century.  The show will feature some of the biggest names in entertainment, music, and sports along with students, educators, parents and more.

June 25, 2017
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues (You might also be interested in The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2017 – So Far):

Inside Connecticut’s Education-Funding Turmoil is from The Atlantic. Here is how it ends:

“My classrooms are full of wonderful people, who are the equal of anybody anywhere. We should invest in them,” he said. “Not investing in them doesn’t just diminish them, it diminishes us.”

Here is more information about what is going on in Connecticut.

Growth plus proficiency? Why states are turning to a hybrid strategy for judging schools (and why some experts say they shouldn’t) is from Chalkbeat.

GOP Health Care Proposals: What Educators Should Know is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning How Repeal Of Obamacare Will Affect Students & Schools.

As Government Retrenches, Philanthropy Booms appeared in The New York Times. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Oakland charters more likely to enroll higher-performing students than district schools is from Ed Source. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

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