Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

July 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

Here are some useful posts and articles on educational policy issues:

‘Innovation’ Schools Get a Chance to Shake Up the Rules is from WNYC in New York City.

Departure of Official Is Sought by Teachers is from The New York Times.

A Draft Bill of Research Rights for Educators is by Daniel Willingham. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research.

Which Education Research Is Worth the Hype? is from The Education Writers Association. I’m adding it to the same list.

Gates’ Excuse for Poor Results of Educational Technology: “Unmotivated Students” and A Question for Bill Gates: How Can We Motivate Students When Their Futures Are Bleak? are both by Anthony Cody at Ed Week. I’m adding them to The Best Posts & Articles On “Motivating” Students.

A Return to ‘Balanced Literacy’? is from Education Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Balanced Literacy & The “Reading Wars.”

Connecting school spending and student achievement is an article in The Washington Post about a really weird “return on investment” ranking of most school districts in the U.S.

Here are several additions to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault, where I’ve been collecting commentaries on the Vergara court decision:

Grounding Vergara In The Realities of Teaching in California is from Ed Week.

For Vergara Ruling on Teachers, Big Questions Loom is also from Ed Week.

Guest Post: In Defense of “Last-In, First-Out” is from on labor.

Print Friendly

July 9, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Resources For Learning About Balanced Literacy & The “Reading Wars”

The so-called “reading wars” on how best to teach literacy are back in the news with the recent announcement that “balanced literacy” is back on the approved list for New York City schools to use.

It should come as no surprise to readers that I’m a big supporter of Lucy Calkins and the balanced literacy approach, as my recent tweet demonstrates:

Here are some more useful resources on the topic. Let me know what else I should add to the list:

New York Schools Chief Advocates More ‘Balanced Literacy’ is from The New York Times.

The Reading Wars Again (or Still) is by Marc Tucker at Ed Week.

How Lucy Calkins, literacy guru and Fariña ally, is fighting to define Common Core teaching is from Chalkbeat.

Balanced Literacy Is One Effective Approach is by Lucy Calkins and is one of several columns on the topic published by The New York Times as part of their “Room For Debate” series.

Here’s a Prezi that might be worth a look:

A Return to ‘Balanced Literacy’? is from Education Week.

In Defense Of Balanced Literacy is from KinderConfidential.

Again, please send me more suggestions of resources to add to this list….

Print Friendly

July 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Our National Union Has A New President!

We-know-what-is-at-stake

Lily Eskelsen García was just elected President of the National Education Association.

You can read more about her at:

Eskelsen García: We Are Fearless and We Will Not Be Silent at NEA Today.

Doug Robinson: Former lunch lady Lily Garcia goes to Washington to run for the NEA from Deseret News.

Check out her blog, Lily’s Blackboard.

Next NEA leader’s first task: Win back public is from Politico and includes this video interview:

Print Friendly

July 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Three Good Resources On Understanding Education Research

Here are new additions to The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education Research:

The Problem with Research Evidence in Education is from Hunting English.

The U.S. Department of Education has published a glossary of education research terms.

If the Research is Not Used, Does it Exist? is from The Teachers College Record.

Print Friendly

July 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

Here are some recent useful resources on educational policy issues:

Ten Reform Claims That Teachers Should Know How to Challenge is by Jack Schneider at Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Providing An “Overall” Perspective On Education Policy.

Teachers And Education Reform, On A Need To Know Basis is from The Shanker Blog. I’m adding it to the same list.


Why many Democrats have turned against teachers unions
is by Jeff Bryant, and appeared in The Washington Post.

Gay Marriage and Vergara is by Rick Hess at Ed Week. I’m adding it to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault.

Harris v. Quinn ruling: Unions hit, but not fatally, by SCOTUS is from Politico.

The Dirty, Little Secret in America’s Education Wars? Money Matters is by Jeff Bryant. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning That Money Does Matter For Schools.

LAUSD board agrees on testing alternative laptops is from The LA Times. I’m adding it to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

New Twist In Common Core Wars is from Politico. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

The History of “Personalization” and Teaching Machines is by Audrey Watters. I’m adding it to both The Best Posts & Articles Highlighting Why We Need To Be Very Careful Around Ed Tech and to The Best Resources On “Race To The Top” (& On “Personalized Learning”).

OPINION: A Distemperate Response to Silicon Valley’s ‘Edtech Revolution’ is from Ed Surge.

Print Friendly

July 5, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Quote Of The Day: “The Secret of Effective Motivation”

The Secret of Effective Motivation is a column in today’s New York Times that’s written by Amy Wrzesniewski and Barry Schwartz.

They focus on recent research they’ve done on the difference between “internal” and “instrumental” motives. In a lot of ways, I think it’s similar to the idea of learning and performance goals, about which I’ve written a lot.

Here’s the part of the column that caught by attention:

There is a temptation among educators and instructors to use whatever motivational tools are available to recruit participants or improve performance. If the desire for military excellence and service to country fails to attract all the recruits that the Army needs, then perhaps appeals to “money for college,” “career training” or “seeing the world” will do the job. While this strategy may lure more recruits, it may also yield worse soldiers. Similarly, for students uninterested in learning, financial incentives for good attendance or pizza parties for high performance may prompt them to participate, but it may result in less well-educated students.

The same goes for motivating teachers themselves. We wring our hands when they “teach to the test” because we fear that it detracts from actual educating. It is possible that teachers do this because of an overreliance on accountability that transforms the instrumental consequences of good teaching (things like salary bonuses) into instrumental motives. Accountability is important, but structured crudely, it can create the very behavior (such as poor teaching) that it is designed to prevent.

Accountability-is

Print Friendly

July 3, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Posts & Articles About OECD’s Survey Of Teacher Working Conditions

The OECD’s 2013 Teaching and Learning International Survey was recently released, and I thought I’d bring together a few good commentaries on it.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts & Articles About The Importance Of Teacher (& Student) Working Conditions, since those working conditions are the focus of the OECD survey.

Let me know if you have suggestions for other articles I should include:

U.S. teachers have harder job than counterparts in industrialized world — survey is by Linda Darling-Hammond and appeared in The Washington Post.

Creating the conditions for teachers to be effective is by Barnett Berry.

Survey: Teachers Worldwide Seek More Opportunities for Collaboration is from Ed Week.

Three Stories Hidden in OECD Survey of U.S. Teachers by Emily Richmond is another story on the same survey.

Print Friendly

June 30, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

I’m behind on posting since I went to Washington, D.C. for a meeting with Education Week writers, but I’m frantically trying to catch-up.

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on education policy issues:

Common Core’s testing framework is crumbling is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

Is this really how we should test reading development in kids? is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

Michelle Rhee and Jack Schneider have had a ten week dialogue over at Education Week, and their discussion has come to an end. However, Rhee finished with quite a doozy, saying that she thinks Kevin Johnson (her husband and mayor of our fair city) — of all people — should be the next U.S. Secretary of Education.

Survey: Teachers Worldwide Seek More Opportunities for Collaboration is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles About The Importance Of Teacher (& Student) Working Conditions.

Three Stories Hidden in OECD Survey of U.S. Teachers by Emily Richmond is another story on the same survey. I’m adding it to that list, as well.

Ten Reform Claims That Teachers Should Know How to Challenge is by Jack Schneider at Ed Week.

New York Schools Chief Advocates More ‘Balanced Literacy’ is from The New York Times.

Debate Intensifies over Value-Added Research is from The National Education Policy Center and provides a good critique of the infamous Chetty study on VAM. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On The NY Times-Featured Teacher Effectiveness Study, where you can many other commentaries on the same research.

Opinion: Blaming Tenure May Be Free But it’s a Cheap Shot is a very good piece in SchoolBook. I’m adding it to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault, which is where I’ve collected other reactions to the Vergara verdict.

Here are two important stories on the well-publicized move by Starbucks to provide college classes to their employees:

Starbucks baristudents should beware the green mermaid bearing gifts is from The Guardian.

Beware of Frappucino U is from The EduOptimists.

Print Friendly

June 25, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Good Posts & Articles On Education Policy

'Occupy the Schools Feb 1, 2012' photo (c) 2012, Michael Fleshman - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues:

Aren’t California tenure policies in fact unreasonable? Plus 4 more Vergara questions asked and answered is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault, which is where I’ve collected a number of thoughtful reactions to a terrible decision.

I’m also adding these three posts to the same list:

Vergara: The silver bullet that wasn’t is by Barnett Berry.

Even in Winning, Vergara Is Still a Loser is from Ed Week.

Is This The End of Teachers Unions is from Ebony.

Pedro Noguera Defends Teacher Tenure in Wall Street Journal is from Diane Ravitch’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Why Teacher Tenure Is Important.

How many bad teachers are there? is from The Hechinger Report. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

There Is Probably No “Crisis” In American Education is by Paul Bruno. I’m adding it to The Best Articles Pointing Out That Our Schools Are Not Failing.

Print Friendly

June 22, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best and Worst Education News of 2014 — So Far

'Good News and Bad News' photo (c) 2009, Mike Licht - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

I always do a year-end “Best & Worst” round-up of ed news, and I also often do a preliminary mid-year summary.

June is a good time for it, and here it is — not ranking in any order….

I hope readers will let me know if they agree or disagree, and also share what they think I missed.

You might also be interested in lists from previous years:

Best and worst education news of 2013

The best — and worst — education news of 2012

The Best (and Worst) Education News of 2011

The Best (and Worst) Education News of 2010

The Best Education News Of 2014 — So Far:

* A new study from well-respected researchers Morgan S. Polikoff and Andrew C. Porter came out raising serious questions about the validity of using Value-Added Measures for teacher evaluation, and received extensive media attention. One can only hope that not too many more nails are now needed to permanently shut VAM’s coffin.

* Ras Baraka was elected mayor of Newark, New Jersey, with opposition to the state’s “One Newark” reform plan for that city’s schools. That particular over-reach by reformers was highlighted in a devastating New Yorker piece titled “Cory Booker, Chris Christie, and Mark Zuckerberg had a plan to reform Newark’s schools. They got an education.”

* A school district in Kentucky received national attention for its development of performance-based assessments as alternatives to standardized tests.

* inBloom, the Gates Foundation-funded student data collection and storage system, closed up shop in the face of overwhelming opposition from parents and other privacy advocates. In a final unsurprising act of hubris, they blamed everybody but themselves and their funders for their failure.

* Strong advocates of teacher leadership and vehement opponents of many elements of school reformers’ agenda were elected Presidents of the Los Angeles and Massachusetts teachers unions.

* The Sacramento City School District became the first district to jump off the sinking ship of the unwise waiver given to eight California districts from No Child Left Behind. Shortly after its departure, the U.S. Department of Education issued a scathing report on the work of the multi-district consortium. Perhaps Secretary Duncan might learn its best to leave us alone out here in California.

* The teachers union in St. Paul, Minnesota continued to demonstrate a national model of family engagement as they garnered a new contract with tremendous support from parents.

* Teachers in Tennessee were successful in getting a state law revoked that said lack of growth in student test scores could be a reason to take away a teacher’s license.

* The Gates Foundation might — just might — be signaling that it’s re-evaluating support for some of their most destructive education policies. They have urged a two-year delay in using standardized test results in teacher evaluations and have been making some thoughtful decisions as they renew their involvement in California. Reactions to their moves ranges from support, to suspicion, to somwhere in-between.

* The courts have ruled that the Los Angeles school district does not have to release teachers’ names with performance rankings, which was a nice rebuke to the newspaper that began the destructive trend of publishing those kinds of results.

* The millions of students who had great learning experiences in their schools this year.

The Worst Education News Of 2014 — So Far:

* Learning about the Vergara court decision in California was a bad way to end the school year for teachers as the judge decided that tenure and due process for us was the cause of school woes, not poverty, lack of resources for schools in underserved communities, or professional support.

* Social Emotional Learning threatens to become just another in a long line of good ideas manipulated and used by school reformers in harmful ways. More and more, it’s being used as a substitute to providing adequate resources and even being used to evaluate prospective teachers.

* The state of Florida became the poster-child for how to do teacher evaluations in most inaccurate and destructive way.

* President Obama announced he wants to start ranking colleges and doing other things he’s been doing to K-12 schools for years. It’s all very bad stuff, though it would have been nice to hear the outrage now being voiced by college presidents said by them when we were being attacked.

* A kindergarten play in New York was canceled by the school because it wouldn’t help make the students “college and career” ready.

* A video from a Chicago professional development session showed why teachers are going out of their minds.

* The North Carolina state legislature continues to lead the way in identifying new ways to make teachers want to leave the state. Other states take advantage of the opportunity to hold job fairs in North Carolina.

* The millions of students who are not getting the education they deserve.

The Most Important “In-Between” Education News Of 2014 — So Far:

There have been two big education news events this year that I don’t think fit into either the “best” or the “worst” categories, but still need to be noted:

* The Common Core Standards continue to be under attack, with a few states withdrawing their support. In the long run, I don’t think the Standards themselves or state opposition is going to make that big of a difference in what we do in our classrooms. However, I am appreciative that it’s bringing additional light to the role of unaccountable private foundations in shaping education policies.

* A major new redesign of the SAT was announced. Again, I’m not sure how big of a difference that’s going to make to us or to our students…

Okay, that’s my list — it’s time to share your reactions….

Print Friendly

June 19, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

What Can School Districts (& School Reformers) Learn From Pixar?

'Pixar Animation Studio' photo (c) 2010, Tyler - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

I haven’t been a big fan of schools being run like businesses (see The Best Posts & Articles Explaining Why Schools Should Not Be Run Like Businesses).

However, here’s one thing school districts and “school reformers” can learn from Pixar Animation studies:

Speaking of Pixar, here’s an infographic from Pixar about one more thing we can learn from them:

Print Friendly

June 18, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

'rally1' photo (c) 2006, Michael McCauslin - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Here are some recent good posts and articles on educational policy issues (you might also be interested in The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far):

Efficiency-Minded Reformers Today Draw from Efficiency-Minded Reformers of a Century Ago is by Larry Cuban.

Philanthropic Advocacy for School Reforms is by Larry Cuban. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

The Vergara Decision is from K-12 Schools: Beyond the Rhetoric at Ed Week. I’m adding it to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault, which is where I’ve collected reactions to the court case.

Weaker Teachers Leaving Schools Under N.Y.C.’s Tenure Changes is from Ed Week. It’s particularly interesting and timely because it points to the fact that administrators can do their job of identifying good teachers before they obtain tenure — in other words, it weakens the rationale for the Vergara decision.

LAUSD reappoints member of bond oversight panel after uproar is from The LA Times. I’m adding it to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

Eliminating teacher tenure won’t improve education is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Both Why Teacher Tenure Is Important & The Reasons Behind Seniority-Based Layoffs.

11 facts about US teachers and schools that put the education reform debate in context is from Vox. It has some good information in it, but also a couple of misleading charts, including assuming that every certificated teacher is actually teaching in the classroom (in their chart on class size) and recognizing the discredited infamous Chetty study.

Flunk the robo-graders is from The Boston Globe. I’m adding it to The Best Posts On Computer-Graded Essays.

Here’s a new meta-analysis on class size studies. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About How Class Size Does Matter

Without Jobs, School Is a Waste of Time is from Recess. Despite its exaggerated headline, I’m adding it to The Best Resources On Why Improving Education Is Not THE Answer To Poverty & Inequality.

Print Friendly

June 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles on Education Policy

'UTLA Protest Against Principal' photo (c) 2014, Clotee Allochuku - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Here are some recent important posts and articles on educational policy issues:

Of course, the big news this week was the awful Vergara decision. Here are some good pieces that have come out and that I’m adding to California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault, which is where I’ve been collecting post-court-decision analyses. You can also find a lot of background info at The Best Resources On California Court Case Attacking Teacher’s Rights (I used the photo to illustrate this post because of LA Supt Deasy’s public support of the ruling):

AFT’s Weingarten smacks Arne Duncan about his praise for Vergara decision is from The Washington Post.
Tenure Is Not the Problem is by Richard Kahlenberg.

Taking On Teacher Tenure Backfires is by Jesse Rothstein and appeared in The New York Times.

Fuzzy Math: The guesstimate that struck down California’s teacher tenure laws. is from Slate.

“Strict scrutiny” of Vergara ruling a setback for California teachers is by David B. Cohen.

A silver lining in the Vergara decision? is from The Washington Post.

Why that ruling against teacher tenure won’t help your schoolchildren appeared in The LA Times.

Here’s a great video response from National Education Association President Dennis Van Roekel:

Here are posts on other policy topics:

Is Teacher Attrition Actually Increasing? is from The Shanker Blog.

Unions and the Concept of ‘Adult Interests’ is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning Why Teachers Unions Are Important.

The VA and VAM is by Gene Glass.

Morality, Validity, and the Design of Instructionally Sensitive Tests is by David Berliner and appeared in Ed Week. Here’s an excerpt:

A consensus is that outside of school factors account for about 60% of the variance in student test scores, while schools account for about 20% of that variance (Haertel, 2013; Borman and Dowling, 2012; Coleman et al., 1966). Further, about half of the variance accounted for by schools is attributed to teachers. So, on tests that may be insensitive to instruction, teachers appear to account for about 10% of the variance we see in student achievement test scores (American Statistical Association, 2014). Thus outside-of-school factors appear 6 times more powerful than teachers in effecting student achievement.

I’m adding it to The Best Places To Learn What Impact A Teacher & Outside Factors Have On Student Achievement.

Gates Foundation urges delay in using tests for teacher evaluation
is from The Washington Post.

Print Friendly

June 11, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Day After The “Vergara” Decision: Here Are More Thoughtful Reflections From Around The Web

June 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
1 Comment

California Court Rules It’s All The Teachers’ Fault

'Tel Aviv - It's all your fault' photo (c) 2011, Yaffa Phillips - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

In an awful ruling for teachers, students and their families, a California court “struck down teacher tenure and seniority protections embedded in California law.”

You can read a lot more about it at:

The Best Resources On California Court Case Attacking Teacher’s Rights

You might also be interested in I Am Tired Of “School Reformers” Using The Civil Rights Movement Legacy To Support Their Agenda

The Best Articles For Helping To Understand Both Why Teacher Tenure Is Important & The Reasons Behind Seniority-Based Layoffs

Here are some reactions:

This is the best analysis of the decision that I’ve seen so far:

And follow-up to that post:

And here’s another very intriguing analysis:

This is a good one, too:

 

 

 

 

And here’s a very interesting “quick reaction” to the verdict people will want to read.

Here’s an article from The NY Times.

Informed Student Advocates Pursue Reforms that, Unlike Vergara v. California, Actually Address Inequity is by Ben Spielberg.

Making it easier to fire teachers won’t get you better ones is by Jack Schneider.

Last Dance of the Lemons
is by EduShyster.

“Strict scrutiny” of Vergara ruling a setback for California teachers is by David B. Cohen.

Job Protections Do Not Hurt Students is by Brian Jones.

Will California’s Ruling Against Teacher Tenure Change Schools?
is by Dana Goldstein.

AFT’s Weingarten smacks Arne Duncan about his praise for Vergara decision is from The Washington Post.

Taking On Teacher Tenure Backfires is by Jesse Rothstein and appeared in The New York Times.

Fuzzy Math: The guesstimate that struck down California’s teacher tenure laws. is from Slate.

“Strict scrutiny” of Vergara ruling a setback for California teachers is by David B. Cohen.

A silver lining in the Vergara decision? is from The Washington Post.

Why that ruling against teacher tenure won’t help your schoolchildren appeared in The LA Times.

Tenure Is Not the Problem is by Richard Kahlenberg.

Here’s a great video response from National Education Association President Dennis Van Roekel:

The Vergara Decision is from K-12 Schools: Beyond the Rhetoric at Ed Week.

Aren’t California tenure policies in fact unreasonable? Plus 4 more Vergara questions asked and answered is from The Washington Post.

Vergara: The silver bullet that wasn’t is by Barnett Berry.

Even in Winning, Vergara Is Still a Loser is from Ed Week.

Is This The End of Teachers Unions is from Ebony.

Opinion: Blaming Tenure May Be Free But it’s a Cheap Shot is a very good piece in SchoolBook.

Gay Marriage and Vergara is by Rick Hess at Ed Week.

Grounding Vergara In The Realities of Teaching in California is from Ed Week.

For Vergara Ruling on Teachers, Big Questions Loom is also from Ed Week.

Guest Post: In Defense of “Last-In, First-Out” is from on labor.

Print Friendly

June 8, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy Issues

'IMG_4039' photo (c) 2010, alyssalaurel - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Here are some recent posts and articles on educational policy issues:

How Bill Gates pulled off the swift Common Core revolution is from The Washington Post. It’s long and important, and I’m adding it to A Collection Of My “Best” Lists On The Common Core.

New teachers union chief is unapologetically adversarial is from The Boston Globe. It looks like some interesting stuff is going to be happening in Massachusetts.

Correcting a Harmful Misuse of Students’ Test Scores is by W. James Popham, and appeared in Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Effective Student & Teacher Assessments.

Zuckerberg schools donation is a gift but at what price? appeared in The San Francisco Chronicle. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

Less Than Half of U.S. Students Slated to Take PARCC, Smarter Balanced Tests is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About The “Next Generation” Of State Testing.

Print Friendly

June 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Far

767574201224216_a-70206605_F0SSUw_pm

It’s time for another of my mid-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,300 “The Best…” lists here).

You might also be interested in:

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2013 — Part Two

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) On Education Policy In One Place

All My 2012 “The Best…” Lists On Education Policy In One Place

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part Two

The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2012 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy In 2011 — Part Two

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Polcy In 2011 — Part One

The Best Articles & Posts On Education Policy — 2010

The “Best” Articles (And Blog Posts) About Education Policy — 2009

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2008

The “Best” Articles About Education — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Articles, Videos & Posts On Education Policy In 2014 – So Fa (not in order of preference):

Thanks to Jack Schneider, I learned about a post by Ben Spielberg titled The Problem with Outcome-Oriented Evaluations. It’s a great piece on teacher evaluation, and reflects important points that are seldom raised in discussions on the topic. He described the value of evaluating inputs, as opposed to outputs. In other words, most teacher evaluation discussion is focused on measuring student outcomes. But, as Ben points out, we often have far less control over those outcomes than is believed.

What If Teacher Evaluation Isn’t Actually Broken After All? by Paul Bruno is a really excellent post.

Paul wrote another great piece titled Why Education Reform is Probably Not The Best Way to Fight Poverty.

Schooled: Cory Booker, Chris Christie, and Mark Zuckerberg had a plan to reform Newark’s schools. They got an education. appeared in The New Yorker.

The American Statistical Association issued a report  containing many criticisms of how Value-Added Measurement is used in teacher evaluations today. It’s not that lengthy, but you can read a summary at Education Week.

Why most professional development for teachers is useless is an excellent piece by Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post.

The Washington Post has republished a post I wrote last month on SEL. Here on my blog, I had titled it Let Them Eat Character. Their title is “The manipulation of Social Emotional Learning.”

Marc Tucker wrote a series on assessments over at Education Week:

The Failure of Test-Based Accountability

Accountability and Motivation

The Story Behind the SAT Overhaul is a very interesting piece in this week’s New York Times Magazine.

The False Markets of Market Based Reforms is by Bruce Baker.

The Case Against Tenure Seems Weak is by Paul Bruno.

Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post has published a piece by Sarah Blaine that I’m sure went “viral” among educators. It’s titled You think you know what teachers do. Right? Wrong.

Why False Compromises Won’t Resolve The Education Debate is by Jeff Bryant. He doesn’t use these exact words, but does a good job distinguishing the difference between a “half a loaf” and “half a baby.” Those are the terms we use in community organizing when describing the differences between a genuine compromise and one which is harmful.

TV Shows: Thinking “West Wing” In A “House Of Cards” World is by Alexander Russo. The Melian Dialogue is a classic tool used by community organizers to illustrate the importance of living in the world “as it is” instead of “as we’d like it to be,” and Alexander effectively uses the contrast in the two TV shows to demonstrate the same lesson about making political change.

I’ve previously connected Pope Francis’ views to education issues. Ed Fuller has written a really interesting post about the Pope’s comments on the education going on in seminaries and making connections to what’s going on in our own classrooms.

This Time It’s Personal and Dangerous is by Barbara Bray.

There’s a great interview with Linda Darling-Hammond on NPR . It’s headlined School Testing Systems Should Be Examined In 2014.

How hard is teaching? is by Valerie Strauss at The Washington Post.

I’ve written a lot about the importance of trust in education. In fact, I have a list titled The Best Posts About Trust & Education. Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz puts that issue in a broader context in New York Times, while at the same time making the connection to education. In No One We Trust is a must-read.

Our Kids — Coddled or Confident? is an excellent post by John Kuhn, and appeared in Anthony Cody’s Education Week Teacher blog.

Let me know what posts and articles you think I’m missing.

You might also be interested in the ed policy “Best” lists I’ve published so far this year:

The Best Articles Showing Why Education Reform Is NOT The Best Way To Fight Poverty

I Am Tired Of “School Reformers” Using The Civil Rights Movement Legacy To Support Their Agenda

The Best Posts & Articles On The Florida Teacher Evaluation Fiasco

The Best Resources On Professional Development For Teachers — Help Me Find More

The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On “Teacher Leadership” — Contribute More!

“The Best Posts On The inBloom Data Fiasco”

The Best Resources On California Court Case Attacking Teacher’s Rights

The Best Posts On Study Finding That Standardized Tests Don’t Measure Cognitive Ability

The Best Posts & Articles On 2012 PISA Test Results

An important new report was published raising major questions about the usefulness of Value-Added Measurement as a teacher evaluation tool.

Read about it at The Washington Post’s article, Good teaching, poor test scores: Doubt cast on grading teachers by student performance, and at Education Week’s piece, Studies Highlight Complexities of Using Value-Added Measures.

 

 

 

Print Friendly

May 31, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Education Policy

'CTU Strike: 'Public $ for Public Schools' Sign' photo (c) 2012, firedoglakedotcom - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Here are some recent useful posts and articles on educational policy issues:

Mark Zuckerberg has contributed a new bunch of money to schools — this time in California — but who knows if he has learned anything from his Newark debacle (see The Best Posts & Articles For Learning About Newark’s $100 Million From Facebook ). Here are some posts/articles on his recent contribution:

Zuckerberg’s philanthropy proves school solutions aren’t easy is from The San Francisco Chronicle.

Mark Zuckerberg is giving $120 million to Bay Area schools (after his last education reform effort didn’t go so well) is from The Washington Post.

Zuckerberg, Wife Gift $120M to CA Schools is from The Associated Press.

John Thompson offers some wise advice to him.

I’m adding all the above links and info to The Best Resources For Learning About The Role Of Private Foundations In Education Policy.

The Common Core FAQ is from NPR. I’m adding it to The Most Useful Resources For Implementing Common Core.

L.A. Unified board refuses to reappoint member of oversight panel is from The LA Times. I’m adding it to A Very Beginning List Of The Best Articles On The iPad Debacle In Los Angeles Schools.

Academics call for pause in PISA tests is from The Washington Post. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On 2012 PISA Test Results.


California’s CORE Districts Faltering On Key Tenets of Waiver, Ed. Dept. Says
is from Education Week. Thankfully, our Sacramento District recently got off that sinking ship. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles On The NCLB Waiver Given To Eight California School Districts.

School Spending Increases Linked to Better Outcomes for Poor Students is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Sites For Learning That Money Does Matter For Schools.

Holding Kids Back Doesn’t Help Them is from Ed Week. I’m adding it to The Best Resources For Learning About Grade Retention, Social Promotion & Alternatives To Both.

The consequences of silence is a great piece by Wendy Lecker, who shares many the thoughts I had when I read about the outrage from college presidents about the Obama Administrations proposed rating systems for higher ed. It would have been nice to hear a little from them when the same thing was being done to K-12.

Misusing Test Data is from Renee Moore’s blog. I’m adding it to The Best Resources Showing Why We Need To Be “Data-Informed” & Not “Data-Driven.”

Everything You Need To Know About Charter Schools is from Vox. I’m adding it to The Best Posts & Articles Analyzing Charter Schools.

Print Friendly