Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

June 18, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Honoring Fred Ross Sr.: With Cesar Chavez, he formed the UFW”

I wrote This Is Great — Legendary Organizer Fred Ross, Sr. Selected For California Hall Of Fame a couple of days ago, and now Peter Dreier and Manuel Pastor, two more former colleagues from my organizing career, have just published an op-ed in The San Jose Mercury News about Fred’s selection.

It’s headlined Honoring Fred Ross Sr.: With Cesar Chavez, he formed the UFW.

Fred-Ross-Sr-once-said-A

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June 18, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Wednesday’s New World Cup Resources

'Brasil Correio - World Cup 1970' photo (c) 2013, footysphere - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Here are the latest additions to The Best Sites For Learning About The 2014 World Cup In Brazil:

Stop the Ball is a fun interactive from The New York Times.

Al Jazeera has a great site with all their World Cup coverage, which includes neat projects like the World Cup of Food.

World Cup Infographics is a site that’s collecting tons of infographics about…the World Cup.

15 Amazing Things You Didn
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Hottest Talk of the Town- FIFA World Cup 2014 Brazil
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

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June 17, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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“Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans”

invasion

Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans is the headline of a useful article in Slate that gives details about the impressive interactive called The Invasion of America: How the United States Took Over an Eighth of the World.

It’s a “must-see” and “must-use” site when teaching U.S. History, and is an excellent illustration of our country’s avarice.

I’m adding it to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About U.S. History.

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June 16, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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This Is Great — Legendary Organizer Fred Ross, Sr. Selected For California Hall Of Fame

'UFW at gerawan farming picketing against union labor.' photo (c) 2013, goldstardeputy - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The California Hall Of Fame has just announced that legendary community organizer Fred Ross, Sr. will “will join 81 Californians previously inducted for exemplifying California’s spirit of innovation.”

Ross, longtime mentor to Cesar Chavez and a legend in the community organizing community, certainly deserves the honor. He’s inspired countless organizers over the years, and my “holiday gift” to readers of this blog each year is a copy of his “Axioms For Organizers.”

I hope this recognition will bring more attention to his work and the work of organizing everywhere.

I learned about his selection today from his son, Fred Ross, Jr., a former organizer colleague of mine when we both were with the Industrial Areas Foundation.

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June 16, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Monday’s New Resources On The World Cup

'Joseph Blatter' photo (c) 2014, Global Panorama - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Here are today’s additions to The Best Sites For Learning About The 2014 World Cup In Brazil:

Why do some people call it soccer? is from the History Channel.

HOW WE PLAY THE GAME is a NY Times interactive.

2014 Brazil World Cup – Round-up 1 is an ELL lesson from Breaking News English.

Slate has compiled a fun video collection of goal celebrations from The Cup.

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June 15, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Sunday’s World Cup Resources

June 15, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Resources For Learning About Freedom Summer

'Foner (Thomas) Freedom Summer papers.' photo (c) 2012, Mississippi Department of Archives and History - license: https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

It’s the fiftieth anniversary of Freedom Summer:

Freedom Summer was a 1964 voter registration project in Mississippi, part of a larger effort by civil rights groups such as the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to expand black voting in the South. The Mississippi project was run by the local Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), an association of civil rights groups in which sncc was the most active member. About a hundred white college students had helped cofo register voters in November 1963, and several hundred more students were invited in 1964 for Freedom Summer, a much-expanded voter registration project.

On June 15, 1964, the first three hundred arrived. The next day, two of the white students, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman, both from New York, and a local Afro-American, James Chaney, disappeared. Although their badly beaten bodies were not discovered for six weeks, certainty that they had been murdered swept the country and helped precipitate the passage of a long-pending civil rights bill in Congress

You might also be interested in:

The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King

The Best Resources To Remember Dr. Martin Luther King’s Death (& Life)

The Best Sites For Learning About The Martin Luther King Memorial

The Best Sites To Teach About African-American History

The Best Sites To Learn About The Greensboro Sit-Ins (It’s The Fiftieth Anniversary)

The Best Places To Learn About President Obama’s Life

The Best Resources For Learning About The “Freedom Riders”

The Best Resources About The March On Washington

A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism – Help Me Find More

The Best Resources For Learning About The Birmingham Church Bombing

The Best Posts, Articles & Lesson Plans On The Jordan Davis Tragedy & Verdict: Our “Classrooms Are Full Of Him”

The Best Resources For Lessons On Trayvon Martin

The Best Commentaries On The 60th Anniversary Of Brown vs. Board Of Education

I Am Tired Of “School Reformers” Using The Civil Rights Movement Legacy To Support Their Agenda

Here are my choices for The Best Resources For Learning About Freedom Summer (and I’m sure I’ll be adding more during the next couple of months):

Freedom Summer is from the History Channel.

50 Years Ago, Freedom Summer Began By Training For Battle is from NPR.

50 years ago, ‘Freedom Summer’ changed South, US is from the Associated Press.

PBS will be showing a movie titled “Freedom Summer” later this month. The movie’s site has lots of resources.

Here are related teacher resources from the Smithsonian.

Here’s the Freedom Summer segment from “Eyes on the Prize.”

Still Learning From The ‘Pearl Harbor’ Of The Civil Rights Movement is from NPR.

In anniversary ceremony, historic church is center for Freedom Summer lessons is from The Hechinger Report.

People came together 50 summers ago to transform education’s trajectory – let’s finish the job is also from The Hechinger Report.

The Tragic Success of Freedom Summer is from Politico.

You might be interested in my 1,300 other Best lists….

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June 14, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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John Lewis: “You Must Find A Way To Get In Trouble”

Congressman and Civil Rights leader John Lewis gave the commencement address at Emory University last month.

Here’s an excerpt, followed by a video of the entire speech.

I’m also going to use the excerpt with a writing prompt next year in my U.S. History class. The prompt will be:

What does John Lewis mean when he says it’s important to get into trouble? To what extent do you agree (or disagree) with what he is saying? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings.

I’m adding this post both to The Best Commencement Speeches and to My Best Posts On Writing Instruction (which is way I collect my writing prompts).

I-saw-those-signs-that

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June 14, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Good Articles On Race

June 13, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Today’s World Cup Resources

'Copa Cocacola 2014/ Puntacana' photo (c) 2014, Pedrito Guzman - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Here are the latest additions to The Best Sites For Learning About The 2014 World Cup In Brazil:

Football and motivation is a World Cup lesson for English Language Learners.

The World Cup In The Classroom – Visualizations Of FIFA 2014 As Teaching Tools is from the ASIDE blog.

The Common Craft #SoccerGuide comes from…Common Craft. Thanks to Richard Byrne for the tip.

Here’s a YouTube playlist of World-Cup related ads.

FIFA World Cup 2014 starts in Brazil is a Boston Globe photo gallery.


Everything You Need to Know About the World Cup – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Football Comes Home: Soccer as Religion in Brazil is a photo gallery from TIME.

The World’s Love Affair With Soccer: A History in Photos is also from TIME.

The World’s Ball is a NY Times interactive on the history of the soccer ball.

The World Cup of Everything Else is from The Wall Street Journal, and may be the most fun and the most useful interactive for the classroom out there.

This chart shows how much more popular the World Cup is than the Super Bowl is from The Washington Post.

World Cup City Guide is from the BBC.

Photos: The World’s Game is from the NY Times.

World Cup Venues is an Associated Press interactive.

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June 10, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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A Zillion New World Cup Resources

Here are new additions to The Best Sites For Learning About The 2014 World Cup In Brazil:

Here’s a great interactive from The NY Times on some star players.

Brazil Prepares for the World Cup is a photo gallery from The Atlantic.

The Best Players at the World Cup, in GIFs is from The Atlantic.

Football to Football Translator is a fun Chrome extension.

The pick of the World Cup songs is from The BBC.

A look at World Cup jerseys since 1930 is from The Washington Post.

Here’s a different kind of video about the World Cup from Amnesty International:

World Cup History
by gobieta.
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

FIFA World Cup - Hosts, Logos, Winners, and Balls
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

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June 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Oops, I Missed Posting About World Environment Day Last Thursday

'Happy World Environment Day' photo (c) 2011, Nisa yeh - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

“World Environment Day (‘WED’) is celebrated every year on 5th june to raise global awareness of the need to take positive environmental action. It is run by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).”

You might be interested in The Best Resources For World Environment Day.

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June 7, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Videos, Interactives & More On The World Cup

'Commemorative coins' photo (c) 2014, Ulrich Peters - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

My The Best Sites For Learning About The 2014 World Cup In Brazil list is getting pretty massive. Here are even more additions:


World Cup dream team: Pick your all-time XI
is from The Guardian.

A 2014 World Cup Special is from The New York Times.

The Goal of Life is an interactive from The Associated Press.

Here’s another AP interactive.

Most Brazilians think the World Cup is a waste of money. They’re probably right. is from Vox.

FIFA World Cup 2014 Brazil is from English Club.

World Cup players must sing national anthem is from Breaking News English.

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June 6, 2014
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — So Far

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Here’s one more in my series of mid-year “Best” lists (you can see all 1,300 of the lists here).

You might also be interested in these previous posts:

The “All-Time” Best Social Studies Sites

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2013 – So Far

All My 2013 “The Best…” Lists (So Far) Related To Social Studies In One Place

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part Two

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2012 — Part One

The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2011

The Best “The Best…” Lists Related To Social Studies — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2010

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2009

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2008

The Best Social Studies Websites — 2007

Here are my choices for The Best Social Studies Sites Of 2014 — So Far:

The Best Places For Students To Learn About…Their Names one of my fairly popular lists — learning about one’s name is a high-interest topic for students. Some relatively new and cool interactive sites have recently come online…

One is Zato Novo Baby Names, which gives you a time lapse of the popularity of names in the United States over the years.

The Name Navigator seems to be a similar tool.

Watch European colonialism rise and fall in seconds in this GIF. Thanks to Vox for the tip, which has also written an accompanying text:

 

The Smithsonian has a series of one-minute “Ask Smithsonian” videos that answer questions on a variety of topics.

There are a number of sites out there that let you click on a location in Google Street View and then show you historical images of that same site going back many, many years. And you can access the best of them at The Best Historical Photo + Video Map-Based Sites. Google has announced their own somewhat similar (though far more limited) “Go Back In Time” feature – they’ve put photos from when they began taking them back in 2007 online so, at least in many places:

If you see a clock icon in the upper left-hand portion of a Street View image, click on it and move the slider through time and select a thumbnail to see that same place in previous years or seasons.

For this next one, I’m just going to begin with a quote from Open Culture:

British Pathé was one of the leading producers of newsreels and documentaries during the 20th Century. This week, the company, now an archive, is turning over its entire collection — over 85,000 historical films – to YouTube.

The archive — which spans from 1896 to 1976 – is a goldmine of footage, containing movies of some of the most important moments of the last 100 years.

It’s an amazing collection that will be gold mine to U.S. and World History teachers everywhere. And, in a bonus to teachers of English Language Learners, many appear to be close-captioned (not using YouTube’s error-plagued automatic system).

I’m adding this amazing video to The Best Websites For Teaching & Learning About World History:

Watch as 1000 years of European borders change (timelapse map) from Nick Mironenko on Vimeo.

Regular readers know I’m a big fan of using “What If?” history in the classroom — see The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons.

It looks like NPR has become a fan of the idea, too. They invited  readers to share their visions of what the world would have looked like if World War One hadn’t happened. See their article, A World Without World War I, Featuring Health-Nut Hitler.

Here’s a well-done interactive:


Produced By Online Accounting Degrees

Big Facts On Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security is an extremely impressive new interactive site on the effects of climate change. It shows its effect in a variety of ways on every region on the earth.

Here’s how it describes itself:

Big Facts is a resource of the most up-to-date and robust facts relevant to the nexus of climate change, agriculture and food security. It is intended to provide a credible and reliable platform for fact checking amid the range of claims that appear in reports, advocacy materials and other sources. Full sources are supplied for all facts and figures and all content has gone through a process of peer review.

Big Facts is also an open-access resource. We encourage everyone to download, use and share the facts and graphic images. We believe that by sharing knowledge we can aid the type of interdisciplinary understanding and collaboration necessary for meeting the challenges posed to agriculture and food security in the face of climate change.

The Big Facts project is led by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). CCAFS is a strategic partnership of CGIAR and Future Earth, led by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). CCAFS brings together the world’s best researchers in agricultural science, development research, climate science and Earth System science, to identify and address the most important interactions, synergies and tradeoffs between climate change, agriculture and food security.

There are quite a few online geography games out there, and you can see them at The Best Online Geography Games. Many of them are pretty hard, and can be frustrating to students.

Spacehopper is a new online game that isn’t easy but, after showing you a Google Street View image of a location, provides clues that make it less difficult. You’re shown a map with various dots on it, as well as the map outline of the country. After three guesses, you’re given the answer along with information on the location.

The Washington Post keeps on coming up with excellent collections of maps and charts.

Last year they published 40 maps that explain the world. It linked to another site called 40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School that also has a number of other good maps. However, that second site also includes a few maps with topics and language that wouldn’t be appropriate for the classroom.

Then, The Post published a sequel: 40 more maps that explain the world.

I added both to The Best Websites For Learning & Teaching Geography.

The Post hasn’t stopped there. They’ve also published 40 charts that explain the world, which I added to The Best Multimedia Resources For Introducing Students To The Advantages Of Charts, Graphs & Infographics.

They’ve recently published yet another exceptional collection titled 25 maps and charts that explain America today.

The BBC has launched an exhaustive interactive site on World  War One, which they call the first in a new way they say they plan to rebrand all their content. The new brand is called iWonder, and their World War One iWonder Guide has just about anything you want to know and is presented in an interactive and accessible format. It even appears that all the video can be seen by viewers in the U.S., which is a surprise since often BBC video is blocked here.

Dan Pink shared this cool translator map on Twitter. It uses Google Translate to translate English into any major European language and then shows the word on the geographical location where the language is primarily spoken. You can read more about it at Business Insider.

Median Income Across the US is a nice interactive map from WNYC that shows the income levels of all the census tracts in the United States.

Here’s another pretty amazing video:

Each year for the past two years I’ve posted about a new online “choose your own adventure” U.S. History game created by Mission US, which is funded by the Corporation For Public Broadcasting and the National Endowment For The Humanities.

First, there was one on the American Revolution, then on slavery.

They’ve unveiled a third one in the series, this one focusing on Native Americans, and it looks great.

You can play A Cheyenne Odyssey here, and all the games here. You can read more about the new game here.

Records of Rights is a new interactive site from the National Archives. It highlights First Amendment rights, Native American rights, workplace rights, equal rights, rights to privacy and sexuality, and more.

Here are the Social Studies related “Best” lists I’ve posted this year:

The Best Sites For Learning About South Africa

The Best Resources On The Protests In Ukraine

The Best Posts, Articles & Lesson Plans On The Jordan Davis Tragedy & Verdict: Our “Classrooms Are Full Of Him”

The Best Resources For Learning About Mudslides

The Best Sites For Learning About Japan

The Best Sites For Learning About India

The Best Sites For Learning About The 2014 World Cup In Brazil

The Best Resources On The Missing Malaysia Airlines Plane

The Best Commentaries On The 60th Anniversary Of Brown vs. Board Of Education

The Best Resources On The Kidnapped School Girls In Nigeria – Help Me Find More

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