Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 19, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two Impressive Interactives: “The Language of the State of the Union” & “Mapping The State Of The Union”

sotu

The Atlantic has published two impressive interactives: one is called The Language of the State of the Union and the other titled Mapping the State of the Union.

They describe the first as “An interactive chart reveals how the words presidents use reflect the twists and turns of American history” and the second as “An interactive graphic shows the 1,410 different spots on the globe presidents have referenced in 224 speeches.”

I’m adding both to The Best (& Most Intriguing) Resources For Learning About The State Of The Union Message.

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January 18, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Second Quote Of The Day: “What, To the Black American, Is Martin Luther King Jr. Day?”

What, To the Black American, Is Martin Luther King Jr. Day? is a powerful op-ed piece in The New York Times by Chris Lebron.

Here’s an excerpt:

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has written a shorter piece with a similar message for TIME, Why I Have Mixed Feelings About MLK Day. This one is probably a little more accessible to younger students.

I’m adding both to The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King.

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January 18, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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More Useful Martin Luther King, Jr. Resources

January 17, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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With The Appropriate Background Knowledge, This Could Be A Good MLK Writing Prompt

 

Vox has just published a short and useful critique of this week’s New Yorker cover suggesting that it communicates that Martin Luther King, Jr.’s main message was reconciliation when, in fact, it was confrontation to achieve justice.

If students had sufficient background knowledge (which, if truth be told, we should all have talked about in our classes already) — Ferguson, Eric Garner, the shooting of the two New York City police officers, Trayvon Martin (you can also find good related teaching materials at A Collection Of Useful Posts, Articles & Videos On Race & Racism) — they could read Vox’s short post, view the New Yorker cover, and respond to a writing prompt like this:

The author writes that Martin Luther King’s main message was that confrontational protest was necessary to achieve justice. To what extent do you agree that often it takes conflict to overcome unfairness and inequality? To support your opinion, be sure to include specific examples drawn from your own experience, your observations of others, or any of your readings (including this article).

I have also previously shared two writing prompts on similar topics:

John Lewis: “You Must Find A Way To Get In Trouble”

Quote Of The Day: “We Must Always Take Sides”

I’m adding this post to The Best Posts On Writing Instruction (where I collect all my writing prompts) and to The Best Websites For Learning About Martin Luther King.

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January 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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The State Of The Union Address Takes Place Next Tuesday – Here Are Related Resources

President Obama will deliver the annual State Of The Union address next Tuesday.

You might find The Best (& Most Intriguing) Resources For Learning About The State Of The Union Message useful.

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January 16, 2015
by Larry Ferlazzo
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Two New Useful Videos On Justice, Race & Cultural Identity

Here are two (really, three) videos from this week that could be very useful in the classroom.

First off, here’s Gina Rodriguez’ acceptance speech at The Golden Globes Awards. You can find the transcript at BuzzFeed, and here’s an excerpt:

For the stories that Americans have, I feel like there’s a perception that people have about Latinos in America specifically — somebody growing up in Chicago, English being my first language, Spanish being my second — that we are perceived a very certain way.

Our stories have been told, and they’re not unmoralistic, you know, being a maid is fantastic. You know, I have many family members that have fed many of their families on doing that job, but there are other stories that need to be told.

You may also be aware that the song, Glory, from the Selma movie also won a Golden Globe.

Here are the lyrics, the first music video (which is particularly accessible to English Language Learners because it displays the lyrics) and then a second one that was just released a couple of days ago.

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