Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

…For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL

January 18, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

The Best Ideas About How To Use Classroom Walls – Please Recommend More Resources

This is definitely not a comprehensive list of ideas and resources – yet.

I hope readers will make more suggestions.

You might also be interested in The Best Posts On The Study Suggesting That Bare Classroom Walls Are Best For Learning.

Here’s what I have so far:

Treating Your Classroom Like “Prime Real Estate” is by Regie Routman at Middleweb.

Is Your Word Wall Really Supporting The Learners In Your Classroom? is by Valentina Gonzalez.

Here’s a tweet from Valentina:

Using Classroom Walls to Create a Thinking-Rich Environment is by Eoin Lenihan.

Teach From the Walls is a video at The Teaching Channel.

January 17, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Statistic Of The Day: The Number Of ELLs Is Growing

The Learning The Language blog at Ed Week reports on recent research about the number of English Language Learners in the United States.

Here’s an excerpt from their article, Rising Number of ESL Students Poses Challenges for U.S. Schools:

 

I’m adding this info to The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current ELL/ESL/EFL News & Research.

January 15, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Suggestions For Assisting Students To Develop Intrinsic Motivation To Learn

 

 

I’ve done “Twitter Chats” for most of my books where I’ve shared short excerpts from them.

I’ve archived them using Storify. However, Storify is going off-line and deleting all content. So, over the next week, I’ll be converting them into a Tweetdeck Collection. I began by bringing together tweets about my book, Self-Driven Learning.

Next, I collected tweets from the last two books on teaching ELLs which I co-authored with Katie Hull.

Here are tweets from my third book on student motivation, Building A Community Of Self-Motivated Learners.  I’m now working on the fourth volume in the series. You can find free resources from all my books here.

January 14, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Lots Of Good Tidbits On Teaching English Language Learners

I’ve done “Twitter Chats” for most of my books where I’ve shared short excerpts from them.

I’ve archived them using Storify. However, Storify is going off-line and deleting all content. So, over the next week, I’ll be converting them into a Tweetdeck Collection. I began by bringing together tweets about my book, Self-Driven Learning.

I thought readers might, or might not, find it useful if I shared them again. I’ll also be including a link to this post in the area where I also have many other free resources for each book.

Here are tweets about the first two books that Katie Hull and I have co-authored about teaching ELLs (we have a third one coming out this April). You can find free resources from all my books here.

January 14, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Here’s How I’m Trying To Incorporate More Retrieval Practice In Class – Let Me Know How I Can Improve

 

I’ve been spending some time learning about “retrieval practice” (see The Best Resources For Learning About Retrieval Practice) and thinking about how to incorporate it more into my classes.

Then, yesterday, I read a very interesting piece by Jen McCabe about how she was doing it, and it gave me some ideas.

In my ELL History classes, we often have open-book tests.  These next two Read Alouds and writing prompts that I plan on sharing with students explain what I’m going to be doing (you can download them here).  Check them out and please give me advice on how I can improve them and the plan they are introducing:

READ ALOUD ONE

KNOWLEDGE READ ALOUD

As we have been learning about the past, we have also been learning about how it is connected to today and in the future.

For example, when we talked about how the National Anthem was created, we also talked about the protests begun by Colin Kaepernick. We learned a little bit about the real story of the Mexican-American War and its impact on us today.  When learning about Harriet Tubman, we learned about the controversy related to putting her image on the twenty-dollar bill. 

It is important to have knowledge, and to remember it, so we can think about how yesterday helps shape today and tomorrow.  This knowledge will help us participate in making decisions about what happens in our country.

We are learning many things this year in U.S. History.   In fact, you might be learning more in this class than in any other U.S. History class in this school since this is the first time you are studying it.  Most other students who have been in this country longer than you have spent many years learning about our country’s history.

And at the same time you are learning about history, you are learning a new language.

It’s a lot to learn. 

And a lot to remember.

 

Writing Prompt:

Please write a one-or-two sentence summary – in your own words – of this Read Aloud.  Do you agree with what it says?  Why or why not?

 

READ ALOUD TWO

MEMORY READ ALOUD

Our first read aloud talked about the importance of knowledge and memory.

There are two main types of memory: short-term memory and long-term memory.

In our short-term memory, we remember things for a short time before we forget them, or until we transfer that knowledge to long-term memory.

We keep things in our long-term memory that we are going to remember for a longer time.

Scientists have found that one of the best ways to help move knowledge into our long-term memory is through “retrieval practice.”  It’s basically forcing ourselves to remember things.

We are going to start doing this through two ways:

One, some of the warm-ups will ask you to write down answers to questions about things we’ve learned before.  You will not be graded on it.  But we hope that it might encourage you to focus more on what we study in class so you will remember more.  The more you remember, the more you will be able to be an active citizen in today’s world and apply what you know to what’s going on today. We all know that we have many challenges right now in our world.

Secondly, when we do the unit tests, you will first try answering them without looking at the book.  Then, after you have tried answering them without the book, you will have a chance to review and change your answers with the book.  You will be graded only on your final answers.

When you take each test, though, we’ll ask you to write down in your notebook how many questions you answered on the test correctly without looking at your book.  The teachers won’t look at what you wrote, but you will know how much each time you really learned and will remember.   Like the warm-ups, we hope that this process will also encourage you to focus more on what we study in class so you will remember more.

 

Writing Prompt:

Please write a one-or-two sentence summary – in your own words – of this Read Aloud.   Do you think the two changes are worth trying?  Why or why not?

 

 

What do you think?

January 14, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

There Are 8 Ways You Can Subscribe To This Blog For Free

Over fifteen thousand people subscribe to this blog for free through RSS Reader or email so they can read the posts daily without having to actually visit the blog (another four-or-five thousand visit each day).

In addition, three thousand readers subscribe to a free monthly email newsletter where I share my “Best” lists and my other picks of the best posts of the month.

Here are details about how you can easily subscribe to receiving daily posts:

I’ve created a Flipboard Magazine for this blog, so that’s a newer way way to read my posts. The posts seem to sometimes be delayed by a few hours but, other than that, it seems to work fine. You can read Sue Waters post to learn about other ways Flipboard can be used.

Subscribe by a RSS Reader. One popular RSS Readers is Feedly (though there are many others). You can read about Feedly in this New York Times guide.

Subscribe to email updates through Feedblitz.

Follow me on Twitter, where I share my posts and many other resources.

Follow me on Pinterest, where I share posts and other resources.

“Friend” or “Follow” me on Facebook, where I also share my posts.

Add me to one of your Google+ Circles.

And, again, if you don’t want to receive daily updates, you can also subscribe to a monthly email newsletter where I share my “Best” lists and my other picks of the best posts of the month.

Hope you find this list of choices helpful!

January 13, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Here’s What I’ll Be Doing Over The Next Six Months

In case any reader is interesting, and I’ll certainly understand if you’re not, here’s a post giving folks a heads-up on what I’ll be doing over the next few months (besides teaching second semester in my high school, playing basketball for the last-place team in our league, blogging here and at Ed Week, and hosting my BAM! Radio Shows):

* The biggest news will be that the third book Katie Hull and I have written, The ELL Teacher’s Toolbox, will be published by Jossey-Bass in early April. You can pre-order it on Amazon. Early excerpts will be published by The Washington Post, Middleweb, Education Week, MindShift and possibly Edutopia. We’ll probably do a Facebook Live feature with Ed Week, too. In the meantime, you can find tons of free resources from all nine of my books here.

* Look for a post next month at The New York Times Learning on Interactive Listening with English Language Learners (you can see all my past Times posts here).

* The American Educator, the American Federation of Teachers journal, will be publishing an article Katie and I are writing on the challenges ELL teachers face and how to respond to them. Look for that in their April issue.

* ASCD Educational Leadership will be publishing a piece I’ve written on micro-writing (or “quick writes”). You can see my last piece for them here: Student Engagement: Key to Personalized Learning

* I’ll be working with Ed Week on a series of videos similar to the one we did on Transfer of Learning last year.

* I’ll be continuing to plan for a pilot class I’ll be teaching next year at our school to support Long-Term English Language Learners (see Here’s My Tentative Plan For A Support Class For Long-Term English Language Learners – Tell Me How I Can Make It Better).

* And I’ll begin writing the fourth book in my student motivation series for Routledge. You can find free resources from the previous ones here.

Who knows what else will come up?

I’ll keep you posted!

January 13, 2018
by Larry Ferlazzo
0 comments

Lots Of Good Tidbits On Helping Students Motivate Themselves

 

I’ve done “Twitter Chats” for most of my books where I’ve shared short excerpts from them.

I’ve archived them using Storify.  However, Storify is going off-line and deleting all content.  So, over the next week, I’ll be converting them into a Tweetdeck Collection.

I thought readers might, or might not, find it useful if I shared them again.  I’ll also be including a link to this post in the area where I also have many other free resources for each book.

I’m starting off with the Twitter Chat on the second book in my student motivating series, Self-Driven Learning.  You can find other free resources from the book here.

Skip to toolbar